Yottabyte

The yottabyte is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information. The prefix yotta indicates multiplication by the eighth power of 1000 or 1024 in the International System of Units (SI), and therefore one yottabyte is one septillion (one long scale quadrillion) bytes. The unit symbol for the yottabyte is YB.

1 YB = 10008bytes = 1024bytes = 1000000000000000000000000bytes = 1000zettabytes = 1trillionterabytes
Multiples of bytes
Decimal
Value Metric
1000 kBkilobyte
10002 MBmegabyte
10003 GBgigabyte
10004 TBterabyte
10005 PBpetabyte
10006 EBexabyte
10007 ZBzettabyte
10008 YByottabyte
Binary
Value IEC JEDEC
1024 KiBkibibyte KBkilobyte
10242 MiBmebibyte MBmegabyte
10243 GiBgibibyte GBgigabyte
10244 TiBtebibyte
10245 PiBpebibyte
10246 EiBexbibyte
10247 ZiBzebibyte
10248 YiByobibyte

A related unit, the yobibyte (YiB), using a binary prefix, is equal to 10248bytes (approximately 1.209 YB).

Examples

In 2010, it was estimated that storing a yottabyte on terabyte-size disk drives would require one million city block-size data-centers, as big as the states of Delaware and Rhode Island combined.[1] By late 2016 memory density had increased to the point where a yottabyte could be stored on SD cards occupying roughly twice the size of the Hindenburg[2] (around 400 thousand cubic metres).

The total amount of data that could be stored in the observable universe using each of the 1078 to 1082 atoms as single bits of information (using their spin for example) is between 1.25×1053 to 1.25×1057 yottabytes.[3]

Beyond yottabyte

Kilobyte, all the way to yottabyte, are units of the International System of Quantities. So far, yottabyte, adopted in 1991, is the largest. Further terms beyond yottabyte have been suggested by some but not adopted. Until larger scales are officially adopted, yottabyte remains the largest.

See also

References

  1. Diaz, Jesus (7 Jun 2010). "The One Hundred Trillion Dollars Hard Drive". Gizmodo. Retrieved 7 March 2013.
  2. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2017-02-02. Retrieved 2017-01-20.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. Villanueva, John Carl (2009-07-30). "How Many Atoms Are There in the Universe?". Universe Today. Retrieved 2019-03-12.
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