Yahiko Line

The Yahiko Line (弥彦線, Yahiko-sen) is a Japanese railway line operated by East Japan Railway Company (JR East) which connects Yahiko Station in the village of Yahiko and Higashi-Sanjō Station in the city of Sanjo, both in Niigata Prefecture. The line shares its name with both Yahiko Village and nearby Mt. Yahiko.

Yahiko Line
Overview
Native name弥彦線
TypeRegional rail
LocaleNiigata Prefecture
TerminiHigashi-Sanjō
Yahiko
Stations8
Operation
Opened1916
OwnerJR East
Rolling stock115 series/E127 series/E129 series
Technical
Line length17.5 km (10.9 mi)
Track gauge1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in)
Electrification1,500 V DC overhead catenary
Operating speed85 km/h (55 mph)
Route map

Stations

Name Japanese Distance
(km)
Transfers   Location
Yahiko 弥彦 0.0   Yahiko Niigata Prefecture
Yahagi 矢作 2.3  
Yoshida 吉田 4.9 Echigo Line Tsubame
Nishi-Tsubame 西燕 8.0  
Tsubame 10.3  
Tsubame-Sanjō 燕三条 12.9 Joetsu Shinkansen Sanjō
Kita-Sanjō 北三条 15.4  
Higashi-Sanjō 東三条 17.4 Shinetsu Main Line
Echigo-Ōsaki 越後大崎 - Closed 1985
Ōura 大浦 - Closed 1985
Echigo-Nagasawa 越後長沢 - Closed 1985

Symbols:

  • | - Single-track
  • ◇ - Single-track; station where trains can pass

Rolling stock

New E129 series EMUs were introduced on local services on the line from fiscal 2014.[1]

Former

  • 115-500 series 2 car EMUs (until March 2015)

History

The Echigo Railway opened the Yahiko to Yoshida section in 1916 and extended the line to Higashi-Sanjo in 1926. The company was nationalised in 1927.

Freight services ceased in 1960, and the line was electrified in 1984.

Former connecting lines

  • Tsubame Station: The Niigata Kotsu opened a 34 km line electrified at 1,500 V DC to Sekiya on the Echigo Line in 1933. Freight services ceased in 1982, and the line closed between 1993 and 1999.
  • Higashi-Sanjo station: An 8 km line to Echigo Nagasawa operated between 1927 and 1985.

References

This article incorporates material from the corresponding article in the Japanese Wikipedia.

  1. 通勤形車両の新造計画について [New commuter train manufacture plans] (PDF) (in Japanese). East Japan Railway Company. 2 July 2013. Retrieved 2 July 2013.
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