Windsor Castle (1783 ship)

Windsor Castle was launched at Whitby. Initially she was primarily a West Indiaman. Then from 1797 she made five voyages as a slave ship and foundered off Bermuda in 1803 after having disembarked her slaves.

History
Great Britain
Name: Windsor Castle
Namesake: Windsor Castle
Builder: Whitby[Note 1]
Launched: 1783[2]
Captured: Foundered 1803
General characteristics
Tons burthen: 300,[2] or 305,[3] or 316[4] (bm)
Propulsion: Sail
Complement:
Armament:
  • 1797:14 × 3&6&9-pounder guns[4]
  • 1801:12 × 9-pounder guns[4]

Career

Windsor Castle first appeared in Lloyd's Register (LR) in 1803 with G. Young, master, G. Tarbut, owner, and trade London–Jamaica.[2]

Year Master Owner Trade Source & notes
1786 G. Young G. Tarbutt London–Jamaica LR
1790 Blackburn G.Tarbutt London–Jamaica LR; small repairs 1789
1796 Crawford Crawford London transport LR; repairs 1789 & good repair 1795
1798 T. Jones Case & Co. Liverpool–Africa LR; repairs 1789, good repair 1795, and new deck & repairs 1798[3]

From 1797 on Windsor Castle made five voyages as a slave ship based out of Liverpool.

Slave voyage #1 (1797–1798): Captain Thomas Jones acquired a letter of marque on 13 March 1797.[4] He sailed from Liverpool on 10 April, bound for West Africa. Windsor Castle gathered her slaves first at New Calabar and then at Bonny. She arrived at Kingston Jamaica on 18 December. There she disembarked 435 slaves. She sailed from Kingston on 18 February 1798 and arrived back at Liverpool on 19 April. She had left with 39 crew members and had 11 crew deaths on the voyage.[5]

Slave voyage #2 (1798–1799): Captain Jones sailed from Liverpool on 15 August 1798, bound for West Africa. Windsor Castle gathered her slaves at Calabar and Bonny, and arrived at Kingston on 72 May 1799. There she landed 420 slaves. She sailed form Kingston on 15 July and arrived back at Liverpool on 3 October. She had left with 50 crew members and had 18 crew deaths on the voyage.[5]

Slave voyage #3 (1800–1801): Captain Jones sailed from Liverpool on 7 May 1800, bound for West Africa. Windsor Castle gathered her slaves at Calabar and delivered them to Suriname on 2 December. She sailed from Suriname on 1 February 1801 and arrived back at Liverpool on 20 April. She had left with 48 crew members and had nine crew deaths on the voyage.[5]

Slave voyage #4 (1801–1802): Captain Gilbert Curry acquired a letter of marque on 8 July 1801.[4] He sailed from Liverpool on 1 July 1801, bound for West Africa. Windsor Castle gathered her slaves at Calabar and delivered them to Trinidad, where she arrived on 10 February 1802. There she landed 280 slaves. She arrived back at Liverpool on 2 May 1802. She had left with 48 crew members and had four crew deaths on the voyage.[5]

Slave voyage #5 (1802–1803): Captain John Bean sailed from Liverpool on 13 October 1802. Because he left during the Peace of Amiens, he did not acquire a letter of marque. It is not clear where Windsor Castle gathered her slaves, but she delivered them to Antigua and St Thomas. She arrived at St Thomas on 23 May 1803, and landed some 289 slaves. She had left Liverpool with 34 crew members and had nine crew deaths on the voyage.[5]

Loss

Lloyd's List reported on 15 November 1803 that Windsor Castle, which had been sailing from St Thomas to Liverpool, had foundered off Bermuda. Eliza, Moon, master, had rescued the crew and taken them to Lancaster. Eliza arrived at Lancaster on 13 November.[6][Note 2]

Notes, citations, and references

Notes

  1. Unfortunately, Windsor Castle is not listed in Weatherill.[1]
  2. Eliza, of 223 tons (bm) had been launched at Lancaster in 1803. LR reported her master as J. Moon, her owner as Worswick, and her trade as Lancaster–Dominica.[7]

Citations

References

  • Weatherill, Richard (1908) The ancient port of Whitby and its shipping. (Whitby: Horne and Son)
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