Windsor (UK Parliament constituency)

Windsor /ˈwɪnzə/ is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2005 by Adam Afriyie of the Conservative Party.[n 2]

Windsor
County constituency
for the House of Commons
Boundary of Windsor in Berkshire
Location of Berkshire within England
CountyBerkshire
Electorate73,136 (2018)[1]
Current constituency
Created1997
Member of ParliamentAdam Afriyie (Conservative)
Number of membersOne
Created fromWindsor & Maidenhead
19181974 (1974)
Number of membersOne
Type of constituencyCounty constituency
Replaced byWindsor & Maidenhead
1424–1918
Number of membersTwo until 1868, then one
Type of constituencyBorough constituency
Overlaps
European Parliament constituencySouth East England

Constituency profile

The re-created constituency, from 1997, has continued a trend of large Conservative Party majorities. In local elections the major opposition party has been the Liberal Democrats, who have had councillors particularly in the town of Windsor itself. Affluent villages and small towns along the River Thames and around the Great Park have continued to contribute to large Conservative majorities, from Wraysbury to Ascot. The only ward with any substantial Labour support is in Colnbrook with Poyle, based in Slough.

Containing one of the least social welfare-dependent demographics and among the highest property prices, the seat has the third highest Conservative share of the vote in the country. At the 2010 election, only two areas voted more strongly towards the Conservative Party: Richmond (Yorks) foremost followed by Beaconsfield in Buckinghamshire.[2]

History

Windsor has had parliamentary representation for centuries, first sending a member in 1301, and continuously from 1424. It elected two members of parliament until 1868, when the constituency was reformed and its representation reduced to one MP. In 1974, the constituency was abolished and a similar one, Windsor and Maidenhead was created. However, in 1997 the constituency was recreated.

The early political history of the area was strongly influenced by the monarch and members of his or her family. Windsor Castle has been an important royal residence throughout the history of the constituency.

17th Century

The pre-1832 franchise of the borough was held by inhabitants paying scot and lot (a local tax). On 2 May 1689 the House of Commons had decided that the electorate should be limited to the members of Windsor Corporation. This was disputed after the next election, in 1690, when the Mayor submitted two returns of different members. The House of Commons reversed the decision of the previous Parliament and confirmed the scot and lot franchise.

18th Century

There were 278 electors in 1712. Namier and Brooke estimated that, in 1754–1790, there were about 300 electors.

During part of the 18th century the Duke of Cumberland (son of King George II) and the Beauclerk family (descended from King Charles II) had political interests in the borough.

King George III became personally involved in the hotly contested 1780 general election. George encouraged local landowner Peniston Portlock Powney to stand by paying him £2,500 from the King's personal account. The King wished to defeat Admiral Keppel (later Viscount Keppel), an incumbent. The monarch went so far as to canvass tradesmen who dealt with the royal household. After this royal interference in the election, Keppel lost by a narrow 16 votes. Namier and Brooke suggest the Windsor electorate had an independent streak and were difficult to manage.

19th Century

In 1832 a new property based franchise replaced the scot and lot qualification. Under the new system, there were 507 registered electors in 1832. The borough representatives before the Reform Act 1832 included soldiers and people connected with the Royal Household, such as Sir Richard Hussey Vivian (MP 1826–1831) and Sir Herbert Taylor (MP 1820–1823). The constituency also returned politicians prominent in national politics, like the Duke of Wellington's elder brother the Earl of Mornington in the 1780s and 1790s or the future Prime Minister Edward Stanley (subsequently the Earl of Derby) in the early 1830s).

The Ramsbottom family filled one seat from 1806 until 1845. The borough had been loyal to the King's Pittite/Tory ministers in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, but became more favourable to the Whig interest after John Ramsbottom (MP 1810–1845) was elected.

By the 1860s the monarch had ceased to interfere in local affairs. The borough fell under the patronage of Colonel R. Richardson-Gardner. Richardson-Gardner was a local landowner, who caused some animosity when following the 1868 general election he evicted tenants who did not support him at the polls. This was the last Parliamentary election the Conservatives lost in Windsor.

Despite (or perhaps because of) his methods, Richardson-Gardner was elected to Parliament in 1874.

20th Century

Successive Conservative MPs, before the First World War, had considerable influence in the constituency; especially when they subscribed generously to local institutions such as a hospital.

The county division created in 1918 combined the town of Windsor, with territory to its west, south and east which had formerly been in the Wokingham division. The incumbent MP for Wokingham up to 1918, Ernest Gardner, was the first representative of the expanded Windsor constituency. The Conservative Party retained the seat continuously, until 1974 when a Windsor constituency temporarily disappeared from the House of Commons.

Boundaries and boundary changes

The constituency covers the town of Windsor and various portions of the surrounding area, in Berkshire.[n 3]

Before 1868: The parliamentary borough of New Windsor[n 4] was based upon the easternmost town in Berkshire in South East England, which grew up around Windsor Castle and the narrowly defined electorate could also vote for the county representatives. The north boundary of the constituency was on the River Thames, which was then the border between Buckinghamshire which had a seat of the same name and Berkshire, likewise the rest of the borough adjoined the Berkshire county constituency.

1868–1918: The boundaries of the parliamentary borough were extended by the Parliamentary Boundaries Act 1868 (31 & 32 Vict., c. 46)[3] to include the villages of Clewer and Eton (the latter being in Buckinghamshire, north of the Thames).[4] Between 1885–1918 the seat to the north of the Thames was the Wycombe division of Buckinghamshire and the other neighbouring constituency was the Wokingham division of Berkshire.

1918–1950: The parliamentary borough was abolished by the Representation of the People Act 1918 and replaced by a county division named Windsor. The local government areas (as they existed in 1918) which comprised the constituency were the Municipal Boroughs of New Windsor and Maidenhead, with the Rural Districts of Cookham, Easthampstead, Windsor and a part of Wokingham.[5]

The new constituency comprised the bulk of the abolished Wokingham division, including Maidenhead and rural areas surrounding Windsor and Maidenhead, but excluding the Municipal Borough of Wokingham itself, and incorporating the abolished Borough, with the exception of Eton, which was added to the Wycombe division of Buckinghamshire.

1950–1974: The constituency was reduced in size by the Representation of the People Act 1948, comprising the Municipal Boroughs of New Windsor and Maidenhead, with the Rural Districts of Cookham and Windsor.[5] Rural areas, including the Rural District of Easthampstead (which incorporated Bracknell) were transferred to the re-established County Constituency of Wokingham.

For the February 1974 general election, the constituency was abolished and renamed Windsor and Maidenhead, with no changes to its boundaries; this area plus Eton, which was transferred from Buckinghamshire, became the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead established under the Local Government Act 1972.

1997–2010: For the 1997 general election, in order to effect an increase in Berkshire's representation from 7 to 8 MPs in accordance with the Fourth Periodic Review of Westminster Constituencies, the Windsor and Maidenhead constituency was abolished and two separate constituencies of Maidenhead and Windsor were created. The majority of the electorate in the abolished constituency was included in Maidenhead, whilst Windsor was joined by Eton and Bray. It also included a ward of Slough Borough Council north of the Thames, which was transferred from the Borough Constituency of Slough, and was extended southwards to include a part of the abolished constituency of East Berkshire, including Ascot and Sunningdale.

The composition of the new constituency was:-

  • The Borough of Bracknell Forest wards of Ascot, Cranbourne and St Mary's;
  • The Borough of Slough Foxborough ward; and
  • The Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead wards of Ascot & Sunninghill, Clewer & Dedworth East, Clewer & Dedworth West, Clewer East, Datchet, Horton & Wraysbury, Eton & Castle, Old Windsor and Sunningdale & Cheapside.[6]

In 1998 there was a small re-alignment of county boundaries in the north east corner of Berkshire. This transferred to the Borough of Slough a small polling district from Surrey and another from Buckinghamshire to form Colnbrook and Poyle[7] This new ward (since renamed Colnbrook with Poyle) was selected for the Windsor constituency, though involved two polling districts (the typically three-four subdivisions of wards).

2010–present: Further to the Fifth Periodic Review, the composition of the constituency is:-

The constituency gained the northern part of the County Constituency of Bracknell, including Binfield. Bray was transferred to Maidenhead and the Foxborough ward of the Borough of Slough returned to the Borough Constituency thereof.

Changes proposed by Boundary Commission

The Boundary Commission for England submitted their final proposals in respect of the Sixth Periodic Review of Westminster Constituencies (the 2018 review) in September 2018 which would reduce the total number of MPs from 650 to 600. Although the proposals were immediately laid before Parliament they were not brought forward by the Government for approval. Accordingly, they will not come into effect for the 2019 election due to take place on 12 December 2019, which will be contested using the constituency boundaries in place since 2010.

The Commission proposed that the Borough of Surrey Heath ward of Windlesham be transferred from the constituency of Surrey Heath.[9]

Members of Parliament

Burgesses in the English Parliament 1510–1707

As there were sometimes significant gaps between Parliaments held in this period, the dates of first assembly and dissolution are given. Where the name of the member has not yet been ascertained or (in the 16th century) is not recorded in a surviving document, the entry unknown is entered in the table.

The Roman numerals after some names are those used in The House of Commons 1509–1558 and The House of Commons 1558–1603 to distinguish a member from another politician of the same name.

ElectedAssembledDissolvedFirst memberSecond member
151021 January 151023 February 1510John WellesWilliam Pury
15124 February 15124 March 1514John WellesThomas Rider
15155 February 151522 December 1515John WellesThomas Rider
152315 April 152313 August 1523unknownunknown
15293 November 152914 April 1536Thomas WardeWilliam Simonds
15368 June 153618 July 1536unknownunknown
153928 April 153924 July 1540unknownunknown
154216 January 154228 March 1544Richard WardeWilliam Simonds
154523 November 154531 January 1547Thomas Legh[10]unknown
15474 November 154715 April 1552Richard WardeEdward Weldon[11]
By January 1552Thomas Little
15531 March 155331 March 1553Richard WardeRichard Amyce
15535 October 15535 December 1553Richard WardeThomas Good
15542 April 15543 May 1554Richard WardeThomas Butler II
155412 November 155416 January 1555Richard WardeWilliam Norreys
155521 October 15559 December 1555Richard WardeWilliam Norreys
14 January 155820 January 155817 November 1558William HanleyWilliam Norreys
5 January 155923 January 15598 May 1559Thomas WeldonRoger Amyce
1562 or 156311 January 15632 January 1567Richard GallysJohn Gresham
15712 April 157129 May 1571John ThomsonHumphrey Michell
12 April 15728 May 157219 April 1583Edmund DockwraRichard Gallys[11]
1576Humphrey Michell
16 November 158423 November 158414 September 1585Henry NevilleJohn Croke III
28 September 158613 October 158623 March 1587Henry NevilleGeorge Woodward
10 October 15884 February 158929 March 1589Henry Neville[12]Edward Hake
26 October 1588Edward Neville I
159318 February 159310 April 1593Henry NevilleEdward Neville II
16 October 159724 October 15979 February 1598Julius CaesarJohn Norreys
1 October 160127 October 160119 December 1601Julius Caesar(Sir) John Norreys
160419 March 16049 February 1611Samuel BackhouseThomas Durdent died and
replaced by
Sir Francis Howard
16145 April 16147 June 1614Sir Richard LovelaceThomas Woodward
162116 January 16218 February 1622Sir Charles HowardSir Robert Bennet
162412 February 162427 March 1625Edmund SawyerThomas Woodward died and
replaced by
Sir William Hewitt
162517 May 162512 August 1625William RussellHumphrey Newbury
16266 February 162615 June 1626William RussellHumphrey Newbury
162817 March 162810 March 1629William BeecherThomas Hewett
No parliament held
164013 April 16405 May 1640Sir Arthur IngramSir Richard Harrison
16403 November 16405 December 1648Cornelius HollandWilliam Taylor
Richard Winwood (1641)
6 December 1648[n 5]20 April 1653 [n 6]
1653 [n 7]4 July 165312 December 1653unrepresentedunrepresented
1654 [n 8]3 September 165422 January 1655unrepresentedunrepresented
1656 [n 9]17 September 16564 February 1658unrepresentedunrepresented
165927 January 165922 April 1659George StarkeyChristopher Whichcote
N/A [n 10]7 May 165920 February 1660unknownunknown
21 February 166016 March 1660
3 April 166025 April 166029 December 1660Alexander BakerRoger Palmer
9 April 16618 May 166124 January 1679Sir Richard Braham[13]Thomas Higgons
19 February 1677Sir Francis Winnington
27 February 16796 March 167912 July 1679Sir John ErnleJohn Powney
5 April 1679Richard WinwoodSamuel Starkey
29 August 167921 October 168018 January 1681John PowneyJohn Carey
4 November 1680Samuel StarkeyRichard Winwood
168121 March 168128 March 1681Samuel StarkeyRichard Winwood
28 March 168519 May 16852 June 1687William ChiffinchRichard Graham
11 January 168922 January 16896 February 1690Henry PowleSir Christopher Wren
23 May 1689Sir Algernon May
6 March 169020 March 169011 October 1695Sir Christopher WrenBaptist May
17 May 1690Sir Charles PorterWilliam Adderley[14]
20 November 1693Sir William Scawen
23 October 169522 November 16956 July 1698Sir William ScawenThe 4th Viscount Fitzhardinge
21 August 169824 August 169819 December 1700The 4th Viscount FitzhardingeRichard Topham
3 January 17016 February 170111 November 1701The 4th Viscount FitzhardingeRichard Topham
21 November 170130 December 17012 July 1702The 4th Viscount FitzhardingeRichard Topham
16 August 170220 August 17025 April 1705The 4th Viscount FitzhardingeRichard Topham
8 May 170514 June 17051707 [n 11]The 4th Viscount FitzhardingeRichard Topham

MPs 1707–1868

YearFirst member[15]First partySecond member[15]Second party
1707 John, Viscount Fitzhardinge Richard Topham
1710 William Paul[n 12]
1711 Samuel Masham[n 13]
1712 Charles Aldworth
1713 Christopher Wren[n 14]
Jan. 1715 Robert Gayer[n 14]
Apr. 1715 Sir Henry Ashurst, Bt Samuel Travers
1722 Charles, Earl of Burford[n 15] William, Earl of Inchiquin
1726 Lord Vere Beauclerk
1727 George, Viscount Malpas[n 16]
1733 Lord Sidney Beauclerk[n 17]
1741 Henry Fox
1744 Lord George Beauclerk
1754 Hon. John Fitzwilliam
1761 Hon. Augustus Keppel
Mar. 1768 Lord George Beauclerk[n 18]
May. 1768 Richard Tonson[n 19]
1772 Hon. John Hussey-Montagu Tory[16]
1780 Peniston Portlock Powney[n 20] Tory[16]
1787 The Earl of Mornington[n 21]
1794 William GrantTory[16]
1796 Henry Isherwood[n 22]Tory[16] Hon. Robert Fulke GrevilleTory[16]
1797 Sir William Johnston, BtTory[16]
1802 John Williams[n 23]Tory[16]
1804 Arthur VansittartTory[16]
1806 Edward Disbrowe[n 24]Tory[16] Richard Ramsbottom[n 25]Tory[16]
1810 John Ramsbottom, juniorNon Partisan
1812 Whig[16]
1819 The Lord Graves[n 21]Tory[16]
1820 Sir Herbert Taylor[n 26]Tory[16]
1823 Edward Cromwell DisbroweNon Partisan
1826 Sir Hussey Vivian[n 27]Non Partisan
1830 Whig[16]
1831 Rt Hon. Edward StanleyWhig[16]
1832 Sir Samuel Pechell, BtWhig[16] Radical[16]
1835 Sir John Edmund de Beauvoir[n 28]Radical[16]
1835 Sir John Elley[n 29]Conservative[16]
1837 Robert GordonWhig[16][17]
1841 Ralph NevilleConservative[16]
1845 George Alexander Reid[n 30]Conservative
1847 Lord John Hay[n 31]Whig[18][19]
1850 John HatchellWhig[20]
1852 Charles GrenfellWhig[21][22][23]
1852 Lord Charles Wellesley[n 32]Conservative
1855 Samson RicardoWhig[24]
1857 William Vansittart[n 33]Conservative
1859 George William Hope[n 34]Conservative
1863 Richard Howard-VyseConservative
1865 Sir Henry Hoare, Bt[n 35]Liberal Henry Labouchere[n 35]Liberal
1866 Charles EdwardsLiberal Roger EykynLiberal

MPs 1868–1974

ElectionMember[15]Party
1868 reduced to one member
1868 Roger Eykyn Liberal
1874 Robert Richardson-Gardner Conservative
1890 by-election Sir Francis Barry, Bt Conservative
1906 James Mason Conservative
1918 Ernest Gardner Coalition Conservative
1922 Sir Annesley Somerville Conservative
1942 by-election Sir Charles Mott-Radclyffe Conservative
1970 Alan Glyn Conservative
Feb 1974 constituency abolished: see Windsor & Maidenhead

MPs 1997–present

ElectionMember[15]Party
1997 Michael Trend Conservative
2005 Adam Afriyie Conservative

Elections

General election 2019: Windsor[25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Adam Afriyie 31,501 58.6 -5.8
Liberal Democrats Julian Tisi 11,422 21.3 +11.2
Labour Peter Shearman 8,147 15.2 -7.7
Green Fintan McKeown 1,796 3.3 +0.7
Independent David Buckley 508 0.9 +0.9
Independent Wisdom Da Costa 376 0.7 +0.7
Majority 20,079 37.3 -4.2
Turnout 53,750 71.6 -1.6
Conservative hold Swing -4.2

Elections 1997–2017

General election 2017: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Adam Afriyie 34,718 64.4 +1.0
Labour Peter Shearman 12,334 22.9 +9.5
Liberal Democrats Julian Tisi 5,434 10.1 +1.5
Green Fintan McKeown 1,435 2.6 -1.0
Majority 22,384 41.5 -8.5
Turnout 53,921 73.3 +3.2
Conservative hold Swing
Election Political result Candidate Party Votes % ±%
General Election 2015 [26][27]
Electorate: 71,554
Turnout: 50,160 (70.1%) -1.2
Conservative hold
Majority: 25,083 (50.0%) +11.6
Adam AfriyieConservative31,79763.4+2.6
Fiona Dent Labour6,71413.4+3.5
Tariq Malik UKIP4,99210.0+7.7
George Fussey Liberal Democrats4,3238.6-13.8
Derek Wall Green1,8343.7+2.4
Wisdom Da Costa Independent5001.0N/A
General Election 2010 [28]
Turnout: 49,588 (71.3%) +7.2
Conservative hold
Majority: 19,054 (38.4%) +16.1
Swing: 8.1% from Lib Dem to Con
Adam AfriyieConservative30,17260.8+11.4
Julian Tisi Liberal Democrats11,11822.4−4.7
Amanjit Jhund Labour4,9109.9−8.0
John-Paul Rye UKIP1,6123.3+0.6
Peter Phillips BNP9501.9N/A
Derek Wall Green6281.3−1.1
Peter Hooper Independent1980.4N/A
General Election 2005 [29][30]
Turnout: 43,691 (65.4%) +8.4
Conservative hold
Majority: 10,292 (23.6%) +2.5
Swing: 1.2% from Lib Dem to Con
Adam AfriyieConservative21,64649.5+2.2
Antony Wood Liberal Democrats11,35426.0−0.1
Mark Muller Labour8,33919.1−5.0
David Black UKIP1,0982.5+0.0
Derek Wall Green1,0742.5N/A
Peter Hooper Independent1820.4N/A
General Election 2001 [31][32]
Turnout: 42,096 (57.0%) −16.5
Conservative hold
Majority: 8,889 (21.1%) +1.6
Swing: 0.8% from Lib Dem to Con
Michael TrendConservative19,90047.3−0.9
Nick Pinfield Liberal Democrats11,01126.1−2.6
Mark Muller Labour10,13724.1+5.8
John Fagan UKIP1,0622.5+1.9
General Election 1997 [33][34][35][36]
Electorate: 69,132
Turnout: 50,781 (73.5%) N/A
Conservative win
Majority: 9,917 (19.5%) −7.7
Swing: 3.9% from Con to Lib Dem
Michael TrendConservative24,47648.2−8.1
Chris Fox Liberal Democrats14,55928.7−0.4
Amanda Williams Labour9,28718.3+5.9
James McDermott Referendum1,6763.3N/A
Paul Bradshaw Liberal3880.8N/A
E. Bigg UKIP3020.6N/A
Ronald Parr Dynamic930.2N/A

Elections 1950-73

Elections in the 1970s

General election 1970: Windsor[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Alan Glyn 32,264 58.9 +9.3
Labour Timothy D. Sullivan 16,214 29.6 -3.9
Liberal Robin J. Trevallion 6,343 11.6 -5.3
Majority 16,050 29.3 +13.2
Turnout 54,821 70.5 -5.8
Conservative hold Swing +6.6

Elections in the 1960s

General election 1966: Windsor[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Mott-Radclyffe 25,630 49.6 -0.7
Labour Roger R. Brown 17,300 33.5 +6.4
Liberal Stephen Ronald Jakobi 8,744 16.9 -5.7
Majority 8,330 16.1 -7.1
Turnout 51,674 76.3 -0.1
Conservative hold Swing -3.5
General election 1964: Windsor[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Mott-Radclyffe 25,274 50.3 -15.1
Labour Peter A. Fletcher 13,652 27.1 -7.5
Liberal Peter G.N. Badge 11,336 22.6 N/A
Majority 11,642 23.2 -7.5
Turnout 50,242 76.4 +0.9
Conservative hold Swing -3.8

Elections in the 1950s

General election 1959: Windsor[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Mott-Radclyffe 29,942 65.4 +2.0
Labour William E. Robinson 15,864 34.6 -2.0
Majority 14,078 30.7 +4.0
Turnout 50,242 76.4 +0.9
Conservative hold Swing +2.0
General election 1955: Windsor[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Mott-Radclyffe 25,390 63.4 +1.8
Labour William O.J. Robinson 14,666 36.6 -1.8
Majority 10,724 26.8 +3.6
Turnout 40,056 73.3 -5.7
Conservative hold Swing +1.8
General election 1951: Windsor[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Mott-Radclyffe 25,612 61.6 +6.0
Labour Marjorie Nicholson 15,977 38.4 +4.6
Majority 9,635 23.2 +1.4
Turnout 9,635 79.0 -3.0
Conservative hold Swing +0.7
General election 1950: Windsor[37][38]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Mott-Radclyffe 23,512 55.6 +1.4
Labour Marjorie Nicholson 14,300 33.8 +0.7
Liberal Alastair Mars 4,495 10.6 -2.1
Majority 9,212 21.8 +0.7
Turnout 42,307 82.0 +14.1
Conservative hold Swing +0.3

Elections 1910-1945

Elections in the 1940s

General election 1945: Windsor[39]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Mott-Radclyffe 26,901 54.2 -4.2
Labour Marjorie Nicholson 16,420 33.1 N/A
Liberal Neville Tufnell 6,331 12.8 N/A
Majority 10,481 21.1 +4.4
Turnout 49,652 67.9 +40.0
Conservative hold Swing N/A
1942 Windsor by-election
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Mott-Radclyffe 9,557 58.4 N/A
Independent Progressive William Douglas-Home 6,817 41.6 N/A
Majority 2,740 16.8 N/A
Turnout 16,374 27.9 N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1930s

General Election 1939/40

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1940. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the Autumn of 1939, the following candidates had been selected;

General election 1935: Windsor[39]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Annesley Somerville Unopposed N/A N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General election 1931: Windsor[39]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Annesley Somerville Unopposed N/A N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1920s

General election 1929: Windsor[39]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Unionist Annesley Somerville 20,564 57.2 -21.5
Liberal Ernest Haylor 11,314 31.5 N/A
Labour Alfred Hugh Chilton 4,049 11.3 -10.0
Majority 9,250 25.8 -31.6
Turnout 35,927 67.6 +1.0
Unionist hold Swing
General election 1924: Windsor[39]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Unionist Annesley Somerville 20,370 78.7 +20.3
Labour C.N.B. Crisp 5,514 21.3 n/a
Majority 14,856 57.4 +40.7
Turnout 25,884 66.6 +9.5
Unionist hold Swing
General election 1923: Windsor[39]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Unionist Annesley Somerville 12,648 58.4 -12.8
Liberal Charles Benjamin Crisp 9,023 41.6 +12.8
Majority 3,625 16.7 -25.6
Turnout 21,671 57.1 -8.6
Unionist hold Swing +12.8
General election 1922: Windsor[39]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Unionist Annesley Somerville 17,504 71.2 +1.8
Liberal Charles Benjamin Crisp 7,087 28.8 N/A
Majority 10,417 42.4 +3.6
Turnout 24,591 65.7 +22.2
Unionist hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1910s

General election 1918: Windsor[39]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
C Unionist Ernest Gardner 10,073 69.4 +6.6
Independent Labour Charles Samuel Edgerley 4,448 30.6 N/A
Majority 5,625 38.8 +13.3
Turnout 14,521 43.5 -44.8
Unionist hold Swing N/A
C indicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.

General Election 1914/15

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

  • Unionist: James Francis Mason
  • Liberal: James Alexander Browning
General election December 1910: Windsor[40][41]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative James Francis Mason 1,779 62.7 +1.6
Liberal Geoffrey Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes 1,057 37.3 -1.6
Majority 722 25.4 +3.2
Turnout 2,836 88.4 -5.4
Conservative hold Swing +1.6
General election January 1910: Windsor[40][41]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative James Francis Mason 1,838 61.1 +8.9
Liberal Heber Hart 1,170 38.9 -8.9
Majority 668 22.2 +17.8
Turnout 3,008 93.7 +4.0
Conservative hold Swing +8.9

Elections 1885-1909

Elections in the 1900s

General election 1906: Windsor[40][42]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative James Francis Mason 1,504 52.2 N/A
Liberal Clive Bigham 1,376 47.8 N/A
Majority 128 4.4 N/A
Turnout 2,880 89.7 N/A
Registered electors 3,210
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General election 1900: Windsor[40][42][43]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Francis Barry Unopposed
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1890s

General election 1895: Windsor[40][42][43]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Francis Barry Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1892: Windsor[40][42]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Francis Barry Unopposed
Conservative hold
By-election, 2 Apr 1890: Windsor[40][42]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Francis Barry 1,522 61.0 N/A
Liberal William Grenfell 972 39.0 N/A
Majority 550 22.0 N/A
Turnout 2,494 90.5 N/A
Registered electors 2,755
Conservative hold Swing N/A
  • Caused by Richardson-Gardner's resignation.

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1886: Windsor[40][42]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Robert Richardson-Gardner Unopposed
Conservative hold
General election 1885: Windsor[40][42][44]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Robert Richardson-Gardner 1,431 59.7 +5.0
Liberal Henry Butler 966 40.3 -5.0
Majority 465 19.4 +10.0
Turnout 2,397 91.8 +6.1
Registered electors 2,612
Conservative hold Swing +5.0

Elections 1868–1880

The bloc vote electoral system was used in two seat elections and first past the post for single member by-elections and general elections from 1868. Each voter had up to as many votes as there were seats to be filled. Votes had to be cast by a spoken declaration, in public, at the hustings (until the secret ballot was introduced in 1872).

General election 1880: Windsor[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Robert Richardson-Gardner 995 54.7 -8.6
Liberal Victor William Bates Van de Weyer[46] 824 45.3 +8.6
Majority 171 9.4 -17.1
Turnout 1,819 85.7 -0.5
Registered electors 2,122
Conservative hold Swing -8.6
General election 1874: Windsor[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Robert Richardson-Gardner 1,064 63.3 +13.5
Liberal Roger Eykyn[47] 618 36.7 -13.5
Majority 446 26.5 N/A
Turnout 1,682 86.2 -3.7
Registered electors 1,951
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +13.5
General election 1868: Windsor[48][45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Roger Eykyn 803 50.3 28.6
Conservative Robert Richardson-Gardner 795 49.7 +28.6
Majority 8 0.5 2.2
Turnout 1,598 89.9 1.4
Registered electors 1,777
Liberal hold Swing 28.6

Elections 1690–1866

Note on percentage change calculations: Where there was only one candidate of a party in successive elections, for the same number of seats, change is calculated on the party percentage vote. Where there was more than one candidate, in one or both successive elections for the same number of seats, then change is calculated on the individual percentage vote.

Note on sources: The information for the election results given below is taken from Cruickshanks et al. 1690–1715, Sedgwick 1715–1754, Namier and Brooke 1754–1790, Stooks Smith 1790–1832 and from Craig thereafter. Where Stooks Smith gives additional information or differs from the other sources this is indicated in a note after the result. When a candidate is described as Non Partisan for an election this means that the sources used do not give a party label. This does not necessarily mean that the candidate did not regard himself as a member of a party or acted as such in Parliament. Craig's party labels have been varied to take account of the development of parties. Tory candidates are classified as Conservative from the 1835 United Kingdom general election. Whig and Radical candidates are classified separately until the formal establishment of the Liberal Party shortly after the 1859 United Kingdom general election.

1690s1700s1710s1720s1730s1740s1750s1760s1770s1780s1790s1800s1810s1820s1830s1840s1850s1860s

Elections in the 1860s

By-Election 9 May 1866: Windsor (2 seats)[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Charles Edwards Unopposed
Liberal Roger Eykyn Unopposed
Liberal hold
Liberal hold
  • Caused by the previous election being declared void on petition after both Hoare and Labouchere were found guilty of bribery via their agents.[49]
General election 1865: Windsor (2 seats)[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Henry Hoare 324 27.2 N/A
Liberal Henry Labouchere 323 27.2 N/A
Liberal William Vansittart 291 24.5 N/A
Conservative Richard Howard-Vyse 251 21.1 49.6
Majority 32 2.7 N/A
Turnout 595 (est) 91.3 (est) +22.3
Registered electors 651
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing N/A
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing N/A
  • Note (1865): Turnout is estimated, in the same way as for 1857. This election was declared void on petition.
By-Election 4 November 1863: Windsor[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Richard Howard-Vyse 287 54.9 15.8
Liberal Arthur Hayter 236 45.1 +15.8
Majority 51 9.8 +7.1
Turnout 523 84.5 +15.5
Registered electors 619
Conservative hold Swing 15.8
  • Caused by Hope's death.

Elections in the 1850s

General election 1859: Windsor (2 seats)[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative William Vansittart 325 38.7 +20.6
Conservative George William Hope 269 32.0 +13.9
Liberal Charles Grenfell 246 29.3 34.6
Majority 23 2.7 1.3
Turnout 420 (est) 69.0 (est) 1.1
Registered electors 609
Conservative hold Swing +19.0
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +15.6
  • Note (1859): Turnout estimated as in 1857. A petition was presented after this election, but it was withdrawn before a formal decision was made upon it.
General election 1857: Windsor (2 seats)[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative William Vansittart 325 36.1 8.4
Whig Charles Grenfell 289 32.1 +3.5
Whig Samson Ricardo 286 31.8 +4.9
Majority 36 4.0 +1.8
Turnout 450 (est) 70.1 (est) +15.2
Registered electors 642
Conservative hold Swing 8.4
Whig hold Swing +3.9
  • Note (1857): As the number of electors who voted is unascertained, the minimum turnout is calculated by dividing the number of votes by two. To the extent that voters did not use both their votes the turnout figure will be an underestimate.
By-election, 14 February 1855: Windsor[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Samson Ricardo Unopposed
Whig gain from Conservative
  • Resignation of Wellesley
General election 1852: Windsor (2 seats)[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Charles Wellesley 241 30.8 N/A
Whig Charles Grenfell 224 28.6 N/A
Whig Samson Ricardo 210 26.9 N/A
Conservative Thomas Bulkeley 107 13.7 N/A
Turnout 391 (est) 54.9 (est) N/A
Registered electors 712
Majority 17 2.2 N/A
Conservative hold Swing N/A
Majority 14 1.8 N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
  • Note (1852): A petition was presented against Wellesley only, but it was dismissed.
By-election, 22 May 1852: Windsor[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Charles Grenfell 330 58.9 N/A
Conservative Arthur Vansittart[50] 230 41.1 N/A
Majority 100 17.9 N/A
Turnout 560 78.7 N/A
Registered electors 712
Whig gain from Conservative Swing N/A
  • Seat vacated on Reid's death
By-election, 10 February 1851: Windsor[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Hatchell Unopposed
Whig hold
By-election, 6 February 1850: Windsor[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Hatchell Unopposed
Whig hold
  • Hay's resignation

Elections in the 1840s

General election 1847: Windsor (2 seats)[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Hay Unopposed
Conservative George Alexander Reid Unopposed
Registered electors 728
Whig gain from Radical
Conservative hold
  • Note (1847): Stooks Smith has the registered electorate as 720.
By-election, 14 March 1846: Windsor[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Ralph Neville Unopposed
Conservative hold
By-election, 8 November 1845: Windsor[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative George Alexander Reid Unopposed
Conservative gain from Radical
  • Caused by Ramsbottom's death
General election 1841: Windsor (2 seats)[45][16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical John Ramsbottom 316 30.9
Conservative Ralph Neville 311 30.4
Whig William Frederick Ferguson[51] 265 25.9
Radical John Edmund de Beauvoir 130 12.7
Turnout 555 86.4
Registered electors 642
Majority 5 0.5
Radical hold Swing
Majority 46 4.5 N/A
Conservative gain from Whig Swing
  • Note (1841): Later in his career Ralph Neville became known as Ralph Neville Grenville. A petition was presented challenging this election, but it was withdrawn before a decision was obtained.

Elections in the 1830s

General election 1837: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Ramsbottom 326 34.68 -8.21
Whig Robert Gordon 292 31.06 N/A
Radical John de Beauvoir 182 19.36 -9.68
Conservative Thomas Bulkeley 140 14.89 -13.18
Turnout 940 (511 voted) 72.69 -17.19
Registered electors 703
General election 1835: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Ramsbottom 353 42.89 -5.51
Radical John de Beauvoir 239 29.04 +4.72
Conservative John Elley 231 28.07 N/A
Turnout 823 (453 voted) 89.88 -1.05
Registered electors 504
  • On petition de Beauvoir was unseated and Elley was seated on 6 April 1835, following a scrutiny.
  • Note (1835): John Walter was a candidate, but he retired from the contest before the election.
General election 1832: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Ramsbottom 408 48.40 N/A
Whig Samuel Pechell 230 27.28 N/A
Radical John de Beauvoir 205 24.32 N/A
Turnout 843 (461 voted) 90.93 N/A
Registered electors 507

Note (1832): Stooks Smith classified Ramsbottom as a Radical candidate from this election. However as Stenton, editing a book composed of Parliamentary biographies published by a contemporary after the Reform Act 1832, described Ramsbottom as being 'of Whig principles' he continues to be classified as a Whig in this article.

General election 1831: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Ramsbottom Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig Edward Stanley Unopposed N/A N/A
By-Election February 1831: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Edward Stanley Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
  • Seat vacated on the appointment of Vivian as Commander of the Forces in Ireland
General election 1830: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Ramsbottom Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig Hussey Vivian Unopposed N/A N/A

Elections in the 1820s

General election 1826: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Ramsbottom Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Hussey Vivian Unopposed N/A N/A
By-Election February 1823: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Edward Cromwell Disbrowe Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan gain from Tory Swing N/A
  • Resignation of Taylor
General election 1820: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Ramsbottom Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory Herbert Taylor Unopposed N/A N/A
  • Note (1820): From this election Stooks Smith does not append junior to the name of John Ramsbottom.

Elections in the 1810s

By-Election February 1819: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory Thomas Graves Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory hold Swing N/A
  • Death of Disbrowe
General election 1818: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory Edward Disbrowe Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig John Ramsbottom, junior Unopposed N/A N/A
General election 1812: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory Edward Disbrowe Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig John Ramsbottom, junior Unopposed N/A N/A
By-Election March 1810: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan John Ramsbottom, junior Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan gain from Tory Swing N/A
  • Resignation of Ramsbottom

Elections in the 1800s

General election 1807: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory Edward Disbrowe Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory Richard Ramsbottom Unopposed N/A N/A
General election 1806: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory Edward Disbrowe 200 39.14 N/A
Tory Richard Ramsbottom 162 31.70 +0.64
Tory Arthur Vansittart 149 29.16 N/A
Turnout 511 N/A N/A
By-Election 1804: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory Arthur Vansittart 200 55.10 N/A
Tory Anthony Bacon 163 44.90 N/A
Majority 37 10.19 N/A
Turnout 363 N/A N/A
Tory hold Swing N/A
  • Seat vacated when Williams was declared not duly elected
General election 1802: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory John Williams 212 35.22 N/A
Tory Robert Fulke Greville 203 33.72 N/A
Tory Richard Ramsbottom 187 31.06 N/A
Turnout 602 N/A N/A
By-Election April 1800: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory Robert Fulke Greville Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory hold Swing N/A
  • Seat vacated on the appointment of Greville as a Groom of the Bedchamber

Elections in the 1790s

By-Election February 1797: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory William Johnson 141 81.50 N/A
Non Partisan William Vining Perry 32 18.50 N/A
Majority 109 63.01 N/A
Turnout 173 N/A N/A
Tory hold Swing N/A
  • Death of Isherwood
General election 1796: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory Henry Isherwood Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory Robert Fulke Greville Unopposed N/A N/A
By-Election 1794: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory William Grant 151 51.89 N/A
Tory Henry Isherwood 140 48.11 N/A
Majority 11 3.78 N/A
Turnout 291 N/A N/A
Tory hold Swing N/A
  • Death of Powney
General election 1790: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory Peniston Powney Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Richard Wellesley Unopposed N/A N/A

Elections in the 1780s

By-Election 1 July 1788: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory Peniston Powney Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory hold Swing N/A
  • Seat vacated on the appointment of Powney as Ranger of the Little Park.
By-Election 19 July 1787: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Richard Wellesley Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan gain from Tory Swing N/A
  • Death of Hussey-Montagu
  • Note (1787): Lord John Russell was a candidate, but declined going to the poll.
General election 31 March 1784: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory John Hussey-Montagu Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory Peniston Powney Unopposed N/A N/A
General election 8 September 1780: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory John Hussey-Montagu 214 36.51 N/A
Tory Peniston Powney 174 35.90 N/A
Whig Augustus Keppel 158 27.59 N/A
Turnout 546 N/A N/A

Elections in the 1770s

General election 8 October 1774: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Augustus Keppel Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory John Hussey-Montagu Unopposed N/A N/A
By-Election 9 November 1772: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory John Hussey-Montagu Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory gain from Non Partisan Swing N/A
  • Death of Tonson.
  • Note (1772): Both Stooks Smith and Napier & Brooke refer to this MP as the Hon. John Montagu.

Elections in the 1760s

By-Election 18 May 1768: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Richard Tonson Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
  • Death of Beauclerk.
General election 16 March 1768: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Augustus Keppel Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan George Beauclerk Unopposed N/A N/A
By-Election 23 December 1765: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Augustus Keppel Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
  • Seat vacated on the appointment of Keppel to an office.
General election 25 March 1761: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan John Fitzwilliam Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Augustus Keppel Unopposed N/A N/A

Elections in the 1750s

By-Election 5 July 1757: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Henry Fox 137 61.43 N/A
Non Partisan Charles Bowles 86 38.57 N/A
Majority 51 23.87 N/A
Turnout 223 N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
By-Election 19 November 1755: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Henry Fox Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
General election 13 April 1754: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Henry Fox Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan John Fitzwilliam Unopposed N/A N/A

Elections in the 1740s

General election 26 June 1747: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan George Beauclerk Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Henry Fox Unopposed N/A N/A
By-Election 31 May 1746: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Henry Fox Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
By-Election 3 December 1744: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan George Beauclerk Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
  • Death of Beauclerk
By-Election 26 December 1743: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Henry Fox Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
  • Seat vacated on the appointment of Fox to an office.
General election 2 May 1741: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Sidney Beauclerk Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Henry Fox Unopposed N/A N/A
By-Election 28 April 1740: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Sidney Beauclerk Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1730s

By-Election 10 March 1738: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Vere Beauclerk 133 50.00 N/A
Non Partisan Richard Oldfield 133 50.00 N/A
Majority 0 0.00 N/A
Turnout 266 N/A N/A
  • Seat vacated after the appointment of Lord Vere Beauclerk to an office.
  • A double return was made. The House of Commons decided the correct result was Beauclerk 240 (60.00%) and Oldfield 160 (40.00%); a majority of 80 (20.00%). Beauclerk was declared duly elected on 27 March 1738.
General election 23 April 1734: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Vere Beauclerk Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Sidney Beauclerk Unopposed N/A N/A
By-Election 16 May 1733: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Sidney Beauclerk Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
By-Election 15 May 1732: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Vere Beauclerk Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
  • Seat vacated on the appointment of Beauclerk as a Commissioner of the Navy.

Elections in the 1720s

General election 16 August 1727: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Vere Beauclerk 247 45.40 N/A
Non Partisan George Cholmondeley 244 44.85 N/A
Non Partisan Francis Oldfield 53 9.74 N/A
Turnout 544 N/A N/A
By-Election 31 May 1726: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Vere Beauclerk Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
General election 20 March 1722: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Charles Beauclerk 249 45.86 N/A
Non Partisan William O'Brien 211 38.86 N/A
Non Partisan -. Proctor 80 14.73 N/A
Non Partisan Robert Gayer 3 0.55 -24.40
Turnout 543 N/A N/A

Elections in the 1710s

General election 26 January 1715: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory Christopher Wren 141 25.68 N/A
Tory Robert Gayer 137 24.95 N/A
Whig Henry Ashurst 136 24.77 N/A
Whig Samuel Travers 135 24.59 N/A
Turnout 549 N/A N/A
  • On petition, Wren and Gayer were unseated and Ashurst and Travers were seated on 14 April 1715.
General election 24 August 1713: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory Christopher Wren 244 48.51 N/A
Tory Charles Aldworth 183 36.38 N/A
Whig Henry Ashurst 76 15.11 N/A
Turnout 503 N/A N/A
By-Election 21 January 1712: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory Charles Aldworth 149 78.42 N/A
Whig Topham Foot 41 21.58 N/A
Majority 108 56.84 N/A
Turnout 190 N/A N/A
Tory hold Swing N/A
By-Election 18 May 1711: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Tory Samuel Masham Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory hold Swing N/A
  • Death of Paul
General election 4 October 1710: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Richard Topham Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory William Paul Unopposed N/A N/A

Elections in the 1700s

General election 3 May 1708: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Berkeley Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Richard Topham Unopposed N/A N/A
General election 8 May 1705: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Berkeley Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Richard Topham Unopposed N/A N/A
General election 16 August 1702: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Berkeley Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Richard Topham Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 21 November 1701: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Berkeley Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Richard Topham Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 3 January 1701: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Berkeley Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Richard Topham Unopposed N/A N/A

Elections in the 1690s

General election 21 July 1698: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Berkeley Elected N/A N/A
Non Partisan Richard Topham Elected N/A N/A
Non Partisan William Scawen Defeated N/A N/A
Turnout Unknown N/A N/A
General election 23 October 1695: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Berkeley Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan William Scawen Unopposed N/A N/A
By-Election 20 November 1693: Windsor
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan William Scawen Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A
  • Death of Adderley, in June 1693
General election 6 March 1690: Windsor (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Non Partisan Christopher Wren Elected N/A N/A
Non Partisan Baptist May Elected N/A N/A
Non Partisan Charles Porter Defeated N/A N/A
Non Partisan William Adderley Defeated N/A N/A
Turnout Unknown N/A N/A
  • Note: There is a discrepancy between sources, as The House of Common 1690–1715 indicates that Wren was elected at this election; whereas Leigh Rayment indicates Sir Algernon May was re-elected; both with Baptist May.
  • On petition, Wren and May were unseated and Porter and Adderley were seated on 17 May 1690.

See also

Notes and references

Notes
  1. A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. As with all constituencies in their modern form, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years, until 1868 the constituency as a parliamentary borough had the right to send two to most Parliaments.
  3. From 1974 the local government county boundary changed to add to Berkshire part of the territory north of the Thames. Eton, Horton and Wraysbury were put into Windsor's borough. Currently Colnbrook in Slough Borough Council is in the seat but the Commission intend to add this to Spelthorne and exchange it for another Slough ward
  4. Sometimes known as New Windsor to distinguish it from the adjoining settlement of Old Windsor which was at the time still in Surrey
  5. Date of Pride's Purge, which converted the Long Parliament into the Rump Parliament
  6. Date when Oliver Cromwell dissolved the Rump Parliament by force.
  7. Date when the members of the nominated or Barebones Parliament were selected. The parliamentary borough of Windsor was not represented in this body.
  8. Date when the members of the First Protectorate Parliament were elected. The parliamentary borough of Windsor was not represented in this body. Windsor formed part of the county constituency of Berkshire for this Parliament.
  9. Date when the members of the Second Protectorate Parliament were elected. The parliamentary borough of Windsor was not represented in this body. Windsor formed part of the county constituency of Berkshire for this Parliament.
  10. The Rump Parliament was recalled and subsequently Pride's Purge was reversed, allowing the full Long Parliament to meet until it agreed to dissolve itself.
  11. The MPs of the last Parliament of England and 45 members co-opted from the former Parliament of Scotland, became the House of Commons of the 1st Parliament of Great Britain which assembled on 23 October 1707 (see below for the members in that Parliament).
  12. Died in office, May 1711
  13. To the House of Lords as Lord Masham, January 1712
  14. Not duly elected at 1715 general election
  15. To the House of Lords, having succeeded to a dukedom, May 1726
  16. To the House of Lords, having succeeded to an earldom, May 1730
  17. Died November 1744
  18. Died May 1768
  19. Died 1772
  20. Died in office, January 1794
  21. A peer of Ireland
  22. Died in office, February 1796
  23. Declared not duly elected
  24. Died in office, February 1819
  25. Resigned, March 1810
  26. Resigned, February 1823
  27. Resigned on appointment as Commander of Forces in Ireland, February 1831
  28. Unseated on petition
  29. Seated after a scrutiny
  30. Died 1852
  31. Resigned 1850
  32. Resigned 1855
  33. Contested the 1865 general election as a Liberal candidate.
  34. Died 1863
  35. Election declared void on petition
References
  1. "England Parliamentary electorates 2010-2018". Boundary Commission for England. Retrieved 23 March 2019.
  2. "Majority Sorted Seats". www.electoralcalculus.co.uk.
  3. Great Britain (1868). The Statutes of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland [1807-1868/69]. unknown library. His Majesty's statute and law printers.
  4. "H.M.S.O. Boundary Commission Report 1868, New Windsor". www.visionofbritain.org.uk. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  5. S., Craig, Fred W. (1972). Boundaries of parliamentary constituencies 1885-1972;. Chichester: Political Reference Publications. ISBN 0900178094. OCLC 539011.
  6. "The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 1995". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  7. The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) (Miscellaneous Changes) Order 1998 (SI 1998/3152).
  8. "The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 2007". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  9. Boundary Commission for England, 2018 Review, Associated consultation documents (September 2018). "Final recommendations report".CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  10. "Legh, Thomas (LH526T)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  11. Died.
  12. Chose to sit for Sussex
  13. Died, April 1676.
  14. Died, June 1693.
  15. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "W" (part 4)
  16. Stooks Smith, Henry. (1973) [1844-1850]. Craig, F. W. S. (ed.). The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. pp. 11–13. ISBN 0-900178-13-2.
  17. Stooks Smith, Henry (1845). The Parliaments of England, from 1st George I., to the Present Time. Vol II: Oxfordshire to Wales Inclusive. London: Simpkin, Marshall, & Co. p. 101. Retrieved 6 January 2019 via Google Books.
  18. Laughton, J. K. (3 January 2008) [2004]. "Hay, Lord John (1793–1851)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/12731. Retrieved 22 July 2018.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  19. "Windsor Election". Windsor and Eton Express. 17 July 1847. pp. 3–4. Retrieved 22 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  20. "The Representation of Windsor". Windsor and Eton Express. 2 February 1850. p. 4. Retrieved 22 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  21. "The General Election". Morning Post. 24 July 1847. p. 3. Retrieved 8 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  22. "Sandwich and Deal Election". Kentish Gazette. 3 August 1847. p. 2. Retrieved 8 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  23. "Weekly Freeman's Journal". 29 May 1852. p. 5. Retrieved 22 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  24. "Windsor". Exeter and Plymouth Gazette. 10 July 1852. pp. 4, 7. Retrieved 22 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  25. "Windsor Parliamentary constituency". BBC News. BBC. Retrieved 26 November 2019.
  26. "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  27. "Windsor parliamentary constituency - Election 2017" via www.bbc.co.uk.
  28. "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  29. "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  30. http://www.politicsresources.net/area/uk/ge05/i21.htm
  31. "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  32. http://www.politicsresources.net/area/uk/constit/272.htm
  33. "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  34. "Politics Resources". Election 1997. Politics Resources. 1 May 1997. Retrieved 7 January 2011.
  35. C. Rallings & M. Thrasher, The Media Guide to the New Parliamentary Constituencies, p.177 (Plymouth: LGC Elections Centre, 1995)
  36. The 1997 election result is calculated relative to a notional 1992 result, as the constituency was re-established in 1997.
  37. British Parliamentary Election Results 1950-1973, FWS Craig
  38. The Times House of Commons, 1950-70
  39. British Parliamentary Election Results 1918-1949, FWS Craig
  40. Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1974). British Parliamentary Election Results: 1885-1918. London: Macmillan Press. p. 211. ISBN 9781349022984.
  41. Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1916
  42. The Liberal Year Book, 1907
  43. Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1901
  44. Debrett's House of Commons & Judicial Bench, 1886
  45. Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885 (e-book)|format= requires |url= (help) (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. pp. 336–337. ISBN 978-1-349-02349-3.
  46. "New Windsor Election, 1880". Windsor and Eton Express. 10 April 1880. p. 1. Retrieved 15 December 2017 via British Newspaper Archive.
  47. "The General Election". Leicester Journal. 13 February 1874. p. 3. Retrieved 23 January 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  48. Constituency reduced to one seat and electorate expanded by the Reform Act 1867, with the constituency boundaries changed by the Parliamentary Boundaries Act 1868, to take effect from the next general election.
  49. "This Evening's News". Pall Mall Gazette. 26 April 1866. pp. 6–7 via British Newspaper Archive.
  50. "London, Wednesday". Hampshire Chronicle. 29 May 1852. p. 2. Retrieved 22 July 2018 via British Newspaper Archive.
  51. "Reading Mercury". 19 June 1841. p. 2. Retrieved 6 January 2019 via British Newspaper Archive.

Sources

  • A Chronological Register of Both Houses of the British Parliament. Robert Beatson, 1807.
  • Boundaries of Parliamentary Constituencies 1885–1972, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Parliamentary Reference Publications 1972)
  • British Parliamentary Election Results 1832–1885, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Macmillan Press 1977)
  • British Parliamentary Election Results 1885–1918, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Macmillan Press 1974)
  • British Parliamentary Election Results 1918–1949, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Macmillan Press, revised edition 1977)
  • British Parliamentary Election Results 1950–1973, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Parliamentary Research Services 1983).
  • The House of Commons 1690–1715, by Eveline Cruickshanks, Stuart Handley and D.W. Hayton (Cambridge University Press 2002)
  • The House of Commons 1715–1754, by Romney Sedgwick (HMSO 1970)
  • The House of Commons 1754–1790, by Sir Lewis Namier and John Brooke (HMSO 1964)
  • Social Geography of British Elections 1885–1910, by Henry Pelling (Macmillan 1967)
  • The Parliaments of England by Henry Stooks Smith (1st edition published in three volumes 1844–50), second edition edited (in one volume) by F.W.S. Craig (Political Reference Publications 1973))
  • Who's Who of British members of parliament: Volume I 1832–1885, edited by M. Stenton (The Harvester Press 1976)
  • Who's Who of British members of parliament, Volume II 1886–1918, edited by M. Stenton and S. Lees (Harvester Press 1978)
  • Who's Who of British members of parliament, Volume III 1919–1945, edited by M. Stenton and S. Lees (Harvester Press 1979)
  • Who's Who of British members of parliament, Volume IV 1945–1979, edited by M. Stenton and S. Lees (Harvester Press 1981)
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