Vacanze di Natale

Vacanze di Natale is a 1983 Italian comedy film directed by Carlo Vanzina. It was shown as part of a retrospective on Italian comedy at the 67th Venice International Film Festival.[1]

Vacanze di Natale
Theatrical release poster by Renato Casaro
Directed byCarlo Vanzina
Produced byAurelio De Laurentiis
Luigi De Laurentiis
Written byCarlo Vanzina
Enrico Vanzina
StarringJerry Calà, Claudio Amendola, Christian De Sica
Music byGiorgio Calabrese
CinematographyClaudio Cirillo
Edited byRaimondo Crociani
Distributed byFilmauro
Release date
  • 1983 (1983)
Running time
97 minutes
CountryItaly
LanguageItalian

Plot

In Christmas of 1983 two families collide in Cortina d'Ampezzo. The first is very rich, elegant, refined taste and character and comes from Milan, consisting of Christian De Sica and Riccardo Garrone, while the second is made up of people extremely vulgar and rough to Rome contains the funny characters Claudio Amendola, Marilù Tolo and Mario Brega. The stories and adventures of the members of the two families intersect and give rise to hilarious misunderstandings, while a penniless pianist (Jerry Calà) fall in love again with his ex-girlfriend (Stefania Sandrelli). Roberto Covelli (De Sica) has an American girlfriend but worthy of much attention and persistently courted by Mario Marchetti (Amendola) which was initially became involved in a meeting with the girlfriend of a friend of his. The contact between the two families will be done through the acquaintance of Mario with a member of Covelli which, when seen in front of the rude common people of Rome are upset. After many adventures finished good and evil Samantha's girlfriend, Roberto, will notice the sad courting the mild Mario and give him what he wishes for one night before leaving for ever's America. Meanwhile, the Covelli Family with astonishment and regret discovers that his young son Roberto is gay. One year after the holiday, families reunite in Sardinia during the summer and will create a new whirlwind of hilarious situations.

Cast

References

  1. "Italian Comedy - The State of Things". labiennale.org. Archived from the original on 1 August 2010. Retrieved 1 August 2010.


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