Top Secret (1952 film)

Top Secret is a 1952 British comedy film directed by Mario Zampi and starring George Cole, Oskar Homolka and Nadia Gray.[2] A sanitation inspector is mistaken for an international spy. The film was known in the U.S. as Mr. Potts Goes to Moscow.[3]

Top Secret
Directed byMario Zampi
Produced byMario Zampi
Written byJack Davies
Michael Pertwee
Story byJack Davies
Michael Pertwee
StarringGeorge Cole
Oskar Homolka
Nadia Gray
Music byStanley Black
CinematographyStanley Pavey
Edited byGiulio Zampi
Production
company
Distributed byAssociated British-Pathé
Release date
  • November 19, 1952 (1952-11-19) (London)
Running time
93 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
Box office£133,313 (UK)[1]

Plot

George Potts, a plumber in a top secret government research plant, accidentally comes into possession of the plans for a revolutionary atomic weapon. As George leaves for his annual holiday, the research security team embarks on a nationwide search for the hapless 'sanitary engineer.' Meanwhile, the Russians get wind of the incident and intercept George, plying him with liquor and employment promises so that he'll hand over the plans to them. All the while, George never knows what the fuss is about: he thinks that the British and Soviet authorities are interested in his new plans for a modern plumbing system. The Russians offer him a job in the Kremlin doing research (on plumbing, he believes),and while there he falls in love with secret agent Tania, and discovers the true nature of the plans he is carrying.[4][5]

Cast

Main cast

Supporting cast

Cameo/uncredited cast

Critical reception

The New York Times noted, "as long as the action stays this side of the Iron Curtain, the production is enjoyable—and understandable — but once entangled with the enigma of Communist rule, the farce ends."[3]

Allmovie wrote, "no one takes Top Secret seriously--certainly not Oscar Homolka, who delivers a bravura performance as a Russian secret agent who wistfully yearns for the glories of the Czarist days."[4]

References

  1. Vincent Porter, 'The Robert Clark Account', Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, Vol 20 No 4, 2000 p499
  2. "BFI | Film & TV Database | TOP SECRET (1952)". Ftvdb.bfi.org.uk. 16 April 2009. Retrieved 30 March 2014.
  3. O. A. G. (3 September 1953). "Movie Review - Mr Potts Goes to Moscow - 'Mr. Potts Goes to Moscow,' an Import". NYTimes.com. Retrieved 30 March 2014.
  4. allmovie
  5. "Top Secret (1952) - Overview". TCM.com. Retrieved 30 March 2014.
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