Thomas Sammons (consul)

Thomas N. Sammons (February 7, 1863 – October 15, 1935) was an American diplomat who served for many years in Korea, Japan and China before retiring as United States Consul General to Australia.

Thomas N. Sammons
Consul General of the United States, Melbourne
In office
1920–1924
Consul General of the United States, Shanghai
In office
1914–1919
Preceded byAmos Parker Wilder
Succeeded byEdwin Cunningham
Personal details
Born(1863-02-07)7 February 1863
New York, United States of America
Died15 October 1935(1935-10-15) (aged 72)
Chicago

Early life

Sammons was born February 7, 1863, in Fonda, New York, the youngest of seven children of John and Julia Flynn Sammons who were Irish immigrants.[1]

He attend the common schools in Albany, New York and then university at New York Law School and George Washington University, Washington DC.[2] Following graduation he first worked as a telegraph operator and then became a reporter and editor. From 1898 to 1905 he worked as a private secretary to United States Senator Addison G. Foster of Washington.[3]

Diplomatic career

In 1905, Sammons was appointed United States Consul-General in Manchuria, China, being first assigned to Newchwang (now Yingkou) and then Mukden (now Shenyang) and Antung (now Dandong). He was involved with the negotiations relating to the opening of the ports under the Treaty between the United States and China for the extension of the commercial relations between them signed in 1903 as a follow up to the Boxer Protocol. From 1907 to 1909 he was US consul-general to Korea and between 1909 and 1913 he was US Consul-General in Yokohama, Japan. Sammons was appointed United States Consul General in Shanghai, serving from 1914 to 1919 when he was transferred to be US consul-general in Melbourne, the then capital of Australia.[4] In 1921, he was slated to become United States Minister to China, but the appointment did not proceed.[5]

He retired in 1925 due to ill health.[6]

Family

Sammons married Elizabeth Wheeler on 30 October 1889. They had a son, Wheeler.[7] Wheeler became publisher of Systems Magazine and Who's Who in America.[8]

Death

Sammons died at his home at 536 Deming Pl. in Chicago on October 15, 1935, after suffering from Parkinson’s Disease for almost 10 years.[9] He was interred in Prospect Hill Cemetery in Canajoharie, New York.[10]

References

  1. Who's Who in Australia, Vol 9, 1922
  2. Who's Who in Australia, Vol 9, 1922
  3. "League of Nations, American's view, Arrival of new Consul General, the Daily Mail, Brisbane, December 8, 1919
  4. "League of Nations, American's view, Arrival of new Consul General, the Daily Mail, Brisbane, December 8, 1919
  5. "Back candidates for envoys: Washington State delegation for Piles and Sammons", New York Times, March 11, 1921.
  6. American Foreign Service Journal, Feb 1936, p90
  7. "Former Consul General, 72, Dies in Chicago", New York Times, October 18, 1935
  8. New Yorker January 16, 1954, p18
  9. American Foreign Service Journal, Feb 1936, p90
  10. Findagrave memorial for Sammons
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