The Venus Model

The Venus Model is a 1918 American silent romantic comedy film starring Mabel Normand and directed by Clarence G. Badger. The film was made at the beginning of the 20th century when Goldwyn Pictures and many early film studios in America's first motion picture industry were based in Fort Lee, New Jersey.[1] It is not known whether the film currently survives,[2] and it may be a lost film.

The Venus Model
1918 advertisement
Directed byClarence G. Badger
StarringMabel Normand
CinematographyJ.C. Bitzer
Distributed byGoldwyn Pictures
Release date
  • June 16, 1918 (1918-06-16)
Running time
50 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageSilent (English intertitles)

Plot

As described in a film magazine,[3] Kitty O'Brien (Normand), a seamstress in the factory of Braddock & Co., in an effort to escape punishment from the foreman she had mimicked, flees into the manager's office. While explaining her presence she shows a bathing suit she has designed, John Braddock (Francis) embraces the idea and the display of the suit brings orders galore. When Braddock is compelled to take a rest, Kitty takes charge of the plant. She gives a young male applicant a job as office boy, but discovers he is the son of her employer, Paul Braddock (La Rocque), expelled from college. She frees him from an indiscreet love affair and, with the return of the elder Braddock, a romance is culminated.

Cast

Reception

Like many American films of the time, The Venus Model was subject to restrictions and cuts by city and state film censorship boards. For example, the Chicago Board of Censors cut, in Reel 4, the intertitle "Well, you be at my apartment tonight and dig up $10,000".[4]

References

  1. Koszarski, Richard (2004), Fort Lee: The Film Town, Rome, Italy: John Libbey Publishing -CIC srl, ISBN 0-86196-653-8
  2. Progressive Silent Film List: The Venus Model at silentera.com
  3. "Reviews: The Venus Model". Exhibitors Herald. New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company. 7 (1): 45. June 29, 1918.
  4. "Official Cut-Outs by the Chicago Board of Censors". Exhibitors Herald. New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company. 7 (2): 31. July 6, 1918.


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