The Burning Cross

The Burning Cross is a 1947 American drama film directed by Walter Colmes. It was written by Aubrey Wisberg and released by Screen Guild Productions.

The Burning Cross
Directed byWalter Colmes
Produced byWalter Colmes
associate
Selvyn Levinson
executive
Robert L. Lippert
Written byAubrey Wisberg
Based onoriginal story by Wisberg
Production
company
Somerset Pictures
Distributed byScreen Guild Productions
Release date
1947
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budgetless than $100,000[1]

The film dealt with the Ku Klux Klan and encountered censorship troubles, being banned in Virginia.[2][3][4][5]

Plot

A war veteran joins the Ku Klux Klan and comes to regard it as evil.

Cast

  • Hank Daniels as Johnny Larrimer
  • Virginia Patton as Doris Greene
  • Dick Rich as Lud Harris
  • Joel Fluellen as Charlie West
  • John Fostini as Tony Areni
  • Raymond Bond as Chester Larrimer

Production

The film was made by a new company, Somerset Pictures, established in 1947 by Walter Combes, Solly Levenstein and Jake Milstein. It was their first movie.[6] They signed an agreement with Screen Guild Productions to distribute. The New York Times called Screen Guild "a minor organization which can afford the risk of alienating the Southern market."[1]

Filming started in June 1947.[7] It was shot at a new studio at Cahuenga, where offices for the Metro organisation had been.[8]

Release

The film was banned in Detroit.[9]

References

  1. By, T. F. (1947, Jun 01). Big temblor staged for 'green dolphin, street' -- KKK expose -- addenda. New York Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/107926088
  2. Schallert, E. (1947, Sep 22). DRAMA AND FILM. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/165803973
  3. By THOMAS F BRADY Special to The New York Times. (1947, Sep 23). LOW-BUDGET FILMS EXPANDING AT FOX. New York Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/108074960
  4. Ooten, Melissa (10 Apr 2013). "Censorship In Black And White: The Burning Cross (1947), Band Of Angels (1957) And The Politics Of Film Censorship In The American South After World War II". Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television. Vol. 33. pp. 77–98.
  5. T.M.P. (1948, Feb 20). At the victoria. New York Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/108312513
  6. FILMLAND BRIEFS. (1947, May 21). Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/165768143
  7. Film exposes collaborator. (1947, Jun 01). Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/165762281
  8. Schallert, E. (1947, May 23). DRAMA AND FILM. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/165775232
  9. Protest ban on 'burning cross'. (1947, Nov 04). New York Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/108056373


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