Sheikhdom of al-Hawra

The Sheikhdom of al-Hawra[lower-alpha 1] (Arabic: Mashyakhat al-Hawra[1]) was a state of the Protectorate of South Arabia, and existed from the 19th century to 1967.[2] It became a British protectorate in 1890.[1]

Sheikhdom of al-Hawra

Mashyakhat al-Hawra
19th century–1967
Hawra and surrounding polities in 1946.
Capitalal-Hawra
Religion
Islam
GovernmentSheikhdom
Sheikh 
 1858 – 1895
`Abd Allah ibn Muhammad Ba Shahid
 1917 – 1951
Awad ibn Salih Ba Shahid
History 
 Established
19th century
 British protectorate
1890
 Disestablished
1967
Population
 1946
300
Today part ofYemen

Rulers

The rulers of al-Hawra bore the title Shaykh al-Hawra.[1]

Sheiks

`Abd Allah ibn Muhammad Ba Shahid, 1858? – 6 May 1895[1]

Sa`if ibn `Abd Allah Ba Shahid, 1895 – February 1896[1]

Ahmad ibn `Abd Allah Ba Shahid, February 1896 – 1 March 1900[1]

Salih ibn `Awad Ba Shahid, March 1900 – 6 October 1917 (Interrupted in May 1904)[1]

Awad ibn Salih Ba Shahid, October 1917 – 1951[1]

Graphical timeline

Demographics

In 1946, the Sheikhdom of al-Hawra had a population of 300.[3]

Geography

A report in 1946 described al-Hawra as a "small fishing village".[4]

Theodore Bent's visit

Between 1893 and 1897, Theodore Bent, and his wife, Mabel Bent, undertook several expeditions into Southern Arabia. At one point, they visited the Sheikhdom of al-Hawra, where they described a large castle, belonging to the ruling Al Kaiti family, dominating a humble village. The castle, built out of sun-dried bricks, was seven stories high and covered roughly an acre (4 km2) of land, and prominently featured battlements, towers, and machicolations. Theodore and Mabel were welcomed by the Sultan, who requested a gift, which was given in the form of 20 Indian Rupees.[5]

Notes

  1. Also spelled Haura.

References

  1. "States of the Aden Protectorates". www.worldstatesmen.org. Retrieved 2019-06-23.
  2. "WHKMLA : History of Yemen". www.zum.de. Retrieved 2019-06-23. al-Hawra (19th c-1967)
  3. An Economic Survey of the Colonial Territories. H.M. Stationery Office. 1951. p. 134.
  4. Division, Great Britain Naval Intelligence (1946). Western Arabia and the Red Sea. Naval Intelligence Division. p. 147.
  5. Bent, Mabel; Bent, Theodore (1900). Southern Arabia. BiblioBazaar. pp. 106, 107. ISBN 9780554298146.
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