Second five-eighths

Second five-eighths, or sometimes second five-eighth,[1] is a name used in New Zealand to refer the rugby union football position commonly known elsewhere as the inside centre or number 12.[2][3][4]

It traditionally described a playmaking type of 12 with good passing and kicking skills as opposed to the strong hard runner and tackler in that position providing less game-management and attacking options. Some second five-eighths such as Sonny Bill Williams and Ma’a Nonu, however, combine aspects of both styles of play.[2][5]

Etymology

The 1903 All Black captain, Jimmy Duncan, is credited with coining the name five-eighths when he decided to take a player from the forwards to add to the backs. The backs at that time consisted of two half-backs, three three-quarters, and a full-back. As the additional player stood between half-back and three-quarters, Duncan came up with the term five-eighths according to the fraction between them.[2]

The player at five-eighths, also known as the five-eighth,[1] could take the ball back to the forwards or pass it on to the three-quarters.[2] This backline innovation occurred before the split between rugby union and rugby league in Australia and New Zealand and the term is now commonly used for the five-eighth position in rugby league football.[6]

As the game of rugby union evolved, the two half-back positions acquired separate functions. The outside half-back, now known as the outhalf or fly-half, became the first five-eighths in New Zealand under the two five-eighths system. The next player on his outside was called the second five-eighths.[2]

The terms first-five and second-five are sometimes used as abbreviated versions of first five-eighths and second five-eighths, respectively.[7][8][9]

Notable second five-eighths

New Zealand All Blacks:

Australian Wallabies:

See also

References

  1. The Chambers Dictionary. Allied Publishers. 2006. p. 608. ISBN 978-81-86062-25-8. Archived from the original on 4 September 2014. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  2. Zavos, Spiro (4 March 2010). "When is a first five-eighths actually a number 10?". The Roar. Archived from the original on 21 September 2013. Retrieved 27 December 2012.
  3. Rattue, Chris (1 November 2008). "Rugby: Donald measures up Carter's crown". New Zealand Herald. Archived from the original on 27 December 2012. Retrieved 27 December 2012.
  4. Mortimer, James (6 May 2012). "All Blacks selection analysis - Second five-eighth". All Blacks. Archived from the original on 27 December 2012. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  5. O'Leary, Conor (3 November 2012). "What The Hell Is a Second Five-Eighth?". Balls. Archived from the original on 27 December 2014. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  6. Australian Language & Culture. Australia: Lonely Planet. 2007. p. 83. ISBN 978-1-74059-099-0.
  7. "First-five options secure with Crusaders". One News. Fairfax. 29 June 2013. Archived from the original on 5 October 2014. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  8. Chadwick, Justin (2 September 2014). "Rugby: Under-fire Beale still right first-five fit for us - Slipper". New Zealand Herald. Archived from the original on 27 December 2014. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  9. Bradford, Brendan (16 October 2014). "Cruden "definitely not getting punished" says Hansen". Sportal. Archived from the original on 27 December 2014. Retrieved 27 December 2014.

Sources

  • Quinn, Keith (1993). The Encyclopedia of World Rugby. ABC Books. ISBN 978-0-7333-0146-9.
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