Sebastian Svärd

Sebastian Steve Qvacoe Cann-Svärd (born 15 January 1983), commonly known as Sebastian Svärd, is a Danish footballer of Swedish and Ghanaian ancestry.[2]

Sebastian Svärd
Personal information
Full name Sebastian Steve Qvacoe Cann-Svärd[1]
Date of birth (1983-01-15) 15 January 1983
Place of birth Hvidovre, Denmark
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Playing position Defensive midfielder
Youth career
–1998 B 1908
1998–1999 KB
1999–2003 Arsenal
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2000–2006 Arsenal 0 (0)
2003Copenhagen (loan) 10 (0)
2004Stoke City (loan) 13 (1)
2004–2005Brøndby (loan) 22 (0)
2005–2006Vitória Guimarães (loan) 28 (1)
2006–2010 Borussia Mönchengladbach 26 (0)
2006–2010 Borussia Mönchengladbach II 5 (0)
2009Hansa Rostock (loan) 13 (0)
2010–2011 Roda JC 12 (0)
2012 Silkeborg IF 3 (0)
2013 Syrianska 10 (0)
2013 Wycombe Wanderers 0 (0)
2014–2015 Songkhla United 27 (0)
2016 Þróttur Reykjavík 8 (0)
National team
1998–1999 Denmark U16 5 (0)
1999–2000 Denmark U17 23 (0)
2000–2001 Denmark U19 13 (0)
2003–2004 Denmark U20 7 (0)
2002–2004 Denmark U21 9 (0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 21:21, 10 January 2018 (UTC)

Club career

Svärd was born in Hvidovre, Denmark, to a Swedish mother and Ghanaian father. He started out at Kjøbenhavns Boldklub, the reserve team of F.C. Copenhagen. Here he was seen as a prodigy, impressing the coaches of the Denmark under-16, under-17 and under-19 national teams. As so he was bought by English club Arsenal for an undisclosed fee in November 2000.[3]

He won the FA Youth Cup with the club's academy in his first season.[3] His first-team Arsenal debut came in a League Cup fourth round match on 27 November 2001, as a substitute in a 2–0 win over Grimsby Town.[4][3] Over the next two years, he made two more appearances for Arsenal, one more in the League Cup against Sunderland and one in the FA Cup against Oxford United.[5] Arsenal went on to win the FA Cup final that season but Svärd was left out of the squad.

He returned on loan to his old club Copenhagen in August 2003, in need of first-team play; after just four months he returned to England to play for Stoke City, for whom he played nine league matches and scored one goal against Sunderland.[6] In August 2004, he came on as a substitute in Arsenal's 3–1 Community Shield victory over Manchester United.[7]

As such soon afterwards he was loaned to Danish club Brøndby IF for the whole season. At Brøndby, he played both as a defensive midfielder and right back, in a season which ended with both the Danish Superliga championship and triumph in the Danish Cup tournament.[8][9] Altogether Svärd was capped a sum of four times for the Gunners.[3]

In July 2005, he left Arsenal to join Portuguese club Vitória Guimarães for an undisclosed fee.[10]

After a single season with Vitória, where he was, and still is a beloved player, he moved to Borussia Mönchengladbach on 21 June 2006, again for an undisclosed fee.[3] On 25 February 2007, he played his first Bundesliga match for Mönchengladbach against Werder Bremen.[11] He was snapped on loan upon 8 January 2009 by Hansa Rostock.[12]

On 15 January 2010, he moved on from Borussia to become a free agent. Svärd was then signed only three days later by Dutch club Roda JC.[13] Svärd then returned to Denmark and played three matches for Silkeborg IF in 2011–12. He joined Swedish side Syrianska for the 2013 Allsvenskan.

On 24 October 2013, he joined Wycombe Wanderers on a one-month contract.[14]

International career

Svärd debuted for the under-21 national team in November 2002, 19 years old. He has played more than 50 matches for various Danish youth national teams.

Career statistics

Source:[15][16][17][18]
Club Season League FA Cup League Cup Other Total
DivisionAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoals
Arsenal 2001–02 Premier League 0000100010
2002–03 Premier League 0010100020
2004–05 Premier League 0000001010
Total 0010201040
Copenhagen (loan) 2003–04 Danish Superliga 90000010100
Stoke City (loan) 2003–04 First Division 131100000141
Brøndby (loan) 2004–05 Danish Superliga 220000000220
Vitória Guimarães (loan) 2005–06 Primeira Liga 281100060351
Borussia Mönchengladbach 2006–07 Bundesliga 9000000090
2007–08 2. Bundesliga 110200000130
2008–09 Bundesliga 6010000070
Hansa Rostock (loan) 2008–09 2. Bundesliga 130100000140
Roda JC 2009–10 Eredivisie 6000000060
2010–11 Eredivisie 6000000060
Silkeborg IF 2011–12 Danish Superliga 3000000030
Hapoel Ramat Gan 2012–13 Israeli Premier League 0010000010
Syrianska 2013 Allsvenskan 100110000111
Songkhla United 2014 Thai League 1 270000000270
Þróttur 2016 Úrvalsdeild karla 8011000091
Career total 171210220801914

Honours

Arsenal[3][7]

Brøndby[9]

Borussia Mönchengladbach[19][20]

References

  1. Svärd profile at ZeroZero.pt Archived 29 January 2010 at the Wayback Machine
  2. Sebastian Svärd Player Profile
  3. "Sebastian Svard". Arsenal.com. Archived from the original on 16 March 2017.
  4. "Gunners' reserves sink Grimsby". The Guardian.com.
  5. "Arsenal end Oxford dream". BBC. 13 February 2003. Retrieved 20 November 2013.
  6. "Sunderland 1–1 Stoke". BBC. 16 March 2004. Retrieved 9 April 2010.
  7. "Arsenal 3-1 Man Utd". BBC.co.uk.
  8. "Brøndby IF lejer Sebastian Svärd". Brondby.com (in Danish).
  9. "Svärd close to Portugal move". Sky Sports.com.
  10. "Svard leaves Arsenal". Sky Sports.com.
  11. "Tactical Formation". Football-Lineups.com. Retrieved 2 March 2007.
  12. "Vertrag mit Sebastian Svärd aufgelöst". Borussia.de (in German).
  13. "Roda JC versterkt zich met Sebastian Svärd". Roda JC.nl (in Dutch).
  14. "Sebastian Svard signs for Wycombe Wanderers". BBC Sport. Retrieved 24 October 2013.
  15. "Sebastian Svard". footballdatabase.eu. Retrieved 10 January 2018.
  16. "S. Svärd". Soccerway. Retrieved 10 January 2018.
  17. "Sebastian Svärd » Club matches". worldfootball.net. Retrieved 10 January 2018.
  18. "Sebastian Svard". Soccerbase. Retrieved 10 January 2018.
  19. "Bundesliga Preview: M'gladbach – Werder Bremen". Goal.com.
  20. "Borussia Monchengladbach 2007/08 Season". Fussball Daten.de.
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