SM UC-32

SM UC-32[Note 1] was a German Type UC II minelaying submarine or U-boat in the German Imperial Navy (German: Kaiserliche Marine) during World War I. The U-boat was ordered on 29 August 1915 and was launched on 12 August 1916. She was commissioned into the German Imperial Navy on 13 September 1916 as SM UC-32. In three patrols UC-32 was credited with sinking six ships, either by torpedo or by mines laid. UC-32 was sunk by the detonation of one of her own mines on 23 February 1917.[1]

History
German Empire
Name: UC-32
Ordered: 29 August 1915[1]
Builder: AG Vulcan, Hamburg[2]
Yard number: 72[1]
Launched: 12 August 1916[1]
Commissioned: 13 September 1916[1]
Fate: sunk by own mine, 23 February 1917[1]
General characteristics [3]
Class and type: German Type UC II submarine
Displacement:
  • 400 t (390 long tons), surfaced
  • 480 t (470 long tons), submerged
Length:
Beam:
  • 5.22 m (17 ft 2 in) o/a
  • 3.65 m (12 ft) pressure hull
Draught: 3.68 m (12 ft 1 in)
Propulsion:
Speed:
  • 11.6 knots (21.5 km/h; 13.3 mph), surfaced
  • 6.7 knots (12.4 km/h; 7.7 mph), submerged
Range:
  • 10,040 nmi (18,590 km; 11,550 mi) at 7 knots (13 km/h; 8.1 mph), surfaced
  • 53 nmi (98 km; 61 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph), submerged
Test depth: 50 m (160 ft)
Complement: 26
Armament:
Notes: 48-second diving time
Service record
Part of:
  • I Flotilla
  • 27 November 1916 – 23 February 1917
Commanders:
  • Oblt.z.S. Herbert Breyer[4]
  • 13 September 1916 – 23 February 1917
Operations: 3 patrols
Victories: 6 merchant ships sunk (9,083 GRT)

Design

A German Type UC II submarine, UC-32 had a displacement of 400 tonnes (390 long tons) when at the surface and 480 tonnes (470 long tons) while submerged. She had a length overall of 49.45 m (162 ft 3 in), a beam of 5.22 m (17 ft 2 in), and a draught of 3.68 m (12 ft 1 in). The submarine was powered by two six-cylinder four-stroke diesel engines each producing 250 metric horsepower (180 kW; 250 shp) (a total of 500 metric horsepower (370 kW; 490 shp)), two electric motors producing 460 metric horsepower (340 kW; 450 shp), and two propeller shafts. She had a dive time of 48 seconds and was capable of operating at a depth of 50 metres (160 ft).[3]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 11.6 knots (21.5 km/h; 13.3 mph) and a submerged speed of 6.6 knots (12.2 km/h; 7.6 mph). When submerged, she could operate for 53 nautical miles (98 km; 61 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph); when surfaced, she could travel 10,040 nautical miles (18,590 km; 11,550 mi) at 7 knots (13 km/h; 8.1 mph). UC-32 was fitted with six 100 centimetres (39 in) mine tubes, eighteen UC 200 mines, three 50 centimetres (20 in) torpedo tubes (one on the stern and two on the bow), seven torpedoes, and one 8.8 cm (3.5 in) Uk L/30 deck gun. Her complement was twenty-six crew members.

Summary of raiding history

Date Name Nationality Tonnage[Note 2] Fate[5]
14 December 1916 Burnhope  United Kingdom 1,941 Sunk
20 December 1916 Hildawell  United Kingdom 2,494 Sunk
29 January 1917 Edda  Sweden 536 Sunk
31 January 1917 Ida Duncan  United Kingdom 139 Sunk
1 February 1917 Jerv  Norway 1,112 Sunk
1 March 1917 Apollonia  Kingdom of Italy 2,861 Sunk

References

Notes

  1. "SM" stands for "Seiner Majestät" (English: His Majesty's) and combined with the U for Unterseeboot would be translated as His Majesty's Submarine.
  2. Tonnages are in gross register tons

Citations

  1. Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boats: UC 32". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 22 February 2009.
  2. Tarrant, p. 173.
  3. Gröner 1991, pp. 31-32.
  4. Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Herbert Breyer". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 16 February 2015.
  5. Helgason, Guðmundur. "Ships hit by UC 32". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 16 February 2015.

Bibliography

  • Bendert, Harald (2001). Die UC-Boote der Kaiserlichen Marine 1914-1918. Minenkrieg mit U-Booten (in German). Hamburg, Berlin, Bonn: Mittler. ISBN 3-8132-0758-7.
  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4.
  • Gardiner, Robert, ed. (1985). Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships, 1906–1921. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 978-0-87021-907-8. OCLC 12119866.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  • Tarrant, V. E. (1989). The U-Boat Offensive: 1914–1945. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 978-0-87021-764-7. OCLC 20338385.

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