SM UB-41

SM UB-41[Note 1] was a German Type UB II submarine or U-boat in the German Imperial Navy (German: Kaiserliche Marine) during World War I.

SM UB-45 a u-boat similar to UB-41
History
German Empire
Name: UB-41
Ordered: 22 July 1915[1]
Builder: Blohm & Voss, Hamburg[1]
Cost: 1,152,000 German Papiermark[2]
Yard number: 265[3]
Launched: 6 May 1916[3]
Completed: 25 August 1916[3]
Commissioned: 25 August 1916[2]
Fate: sunk by mine 5 October 1917[2]
General characteristics
Class and type: German Type UB II submarine
Displacement:
  • 274 t (270 long tons) surfaced
  • 303 t (298 long tons) submerged
Length:
Beam:
  • 4.37 m (14 ft 4 in) o/a
  • 3.85 m (12 ft 8 in) pressure hull
Draught: 3.69 m (12 ft 1 in)
Propulsion:
Speed:
  • 9.15 knots (16.95 km/h; 10.53 mph) surfaced
  • 5.81 knots (10.76 km/h; 6.69 mph) submerged
Range:
  • 6,450 nmi (11,950 km; 7,420 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph) surfaced
  • 45 nmi (83 km; 52 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
Test depth: 50 m (160 ft)
Complement: 2 officers, 21 men
Armament:
Notes: 42-second diving time
Service record
Part of:
  • Imperial German Navy:
  • II Flotilla
  • 2 November 1916 – 13 September 1917
  • V Flotilla
  • 13 September – 5 October 1917
Commanders:
  • Oblt.z.S. Friedrich Karl Sichart von Sichartshofen[4]
  • 25 August 1916 – 20 March 1917
  • Oblt.z.S. Günther Krause[5]
  • 21 March – 13 September 1917
  • Oblt.z.S. Max Ploen[6]
  • 14 September – 5 October 1917
Operations: 13 patrols
Victories:
  • 8 merchant ships sunk (8,387 GRT)
  • 2 merchant ships damaged (641 GRT)
  • 1 merchant ships captured as a prize (259 GRT)

Design

A German Type UB II submarine, UB-41 had a displacement of 274 tonnes (270 long tons) when at the surface and 303 tonnes (298 long tons) while submerged. She had a total length of 36.90 m (121 ft 1 in), a beam of 4.37 m (14 ft 4 in), and a draught of 3.69 m (12 ft 1 in). The submarine was powered by two Körting six-cylinder diesel engines producing a total 284 metric horsepower (280 shp; 209 kW), two Siemens-Schuckert electric motors producing 280 metric horsepower (210 kW; 280 shp), and one propeller shaft. She was capable of operating at depths of up to 50 metres (160 ft).[2]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 9.15 knots (16.95 km/h; 10.53 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 5.81 knots (10.76 km/h; 6.69 mph). When submerged, she could operate for 45 nautical miles (83 km; 52 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph); when surfaced, she could travel 6,450 nautical miles (11,950 km; 7,420 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph). UB-41 was fitted with two 50 centimetres (20 in) torpedo tubes, four torpedoes, and one 8.8 cm (3.5 in) Uk L/30 deck gun. She had a complement of twenty-one crew members and two officers and a 42-second dive time.[2]

Construction and career

The U-boat was ordered on 22 July 1915 and launched on 6 May 1916. She was commissioned into the German Imperial Navy on 25 August 1916 as SM UB-41.

The submarine sank eight ships in thirteen patrols. They included the William Cory and Son collier SS Harrow, which UB-41 torpedoed in the North Sea off Robin Hood's Bay on 8 September 1917. UB-41 was struck by a mine, possibly a German one, and sank in the North Sea on 5 October 1917.[2]

Summary of raiding history

Date Name Nationality Tonnage[Note 2] Fate[7]
21 November 1916 Thyholmen  Norway 259 Captured as a prize
18 January 1917 Cetus  United Kingdom 139 Damaged
19 April 1917 Ellida  Norway 1,124 Sunk
22 May 1917 Lanthorn  United Kingdom 2,299 Sunk
23 May 1917 Monarch  Norway 1,318 Sunk
12 June 1917 Alwyn  United Kingdom 73 Sunk
13 June 1917 Silverburn  United Kingdom 284 Sunk
14 June 1917 Angantyr  Denmark 1,359 Sunk
6 August 1917 Talisman  United Kingdom 153 Sunk
8 September 1917 Harrow  United Kingdom 1,777 Sunk
3 October 1917 Clydebrae  United Kingdom 502 Damaged

References

Notes

  1. "SM" stands for "Seiner Majestät" (English: His Majesty's) and combined with the U for Unterseeboot would be translated as His Majesty's Submarine.
  2. Tonnages are in gross register tons

Citations

  1. Rössler 1979, p. 64.
  2. Gröner 1991, pp. 23-25.
  3. Rössler 1979, p. 65.
  4. Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Friedrich Karl Sichart von Sichartshofen". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 2 February 2015.
  5. Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Günther Krause". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 2 February 2015.
  6. Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Max Ploen". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 2 February 2015.
  7. Helgason, Guðmundur. "Ships hit by UB 41". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 2 February 2015.

Bibliography

  • Bendert, Harald (2000). Die UB-Boote der Kaiserlichen Marine, 1914-1918. Einsätze, Erfolge, Schicksal (in German). Hamburg: Verlag E.S. Mittler & Sohn GmbH. ISBN 3-8132-0713-7.
  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4.
  • Rössler, Eberhard (1979). U-Bootbau bis Ende des 1. Weltkrieges, Konstruktionen für das Ausland und die Jahre 1935 – 1945. Die deutschen U-Boote und ihre Werften (in German). I. Munich: Bernard & Graefe. ISBN 3-7637-5213-7.

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