SM UB-23

SM UB-23[Note 1] was a German Type UB II submarine or U-boat in the German Imperial Navy (German: Kaiserliche Marine) during World War I. The U-boat was ordered on 30 April 1915 and launched on 9 October 1915. She was commissioned into the Imperial German Navy on 13 March 1916 as SM UB-23. The submarine sank 49 ships in 21 patrols for a total of 28,228 gross register tons (GRT).[8] On 26 July 1917, UB-23 was badly damaged by a depth charge attack by HMS PC-60 off the Lizard; she put in at Corunna, Spain, on 29 July 1917 and was interned.[9] On 22 January 1919 she was surrendered to France in accordance with the requirements of the Armistice with Germany, and she was broken up in Cherbourg in July 1921.

SM UB-45, a u-boat similar to UB-23
History
German Empire
Name: UB-23
Ordered: 30 April 1915[1]
Builder: Blohm & Voss, Hamburg[1]
Yard number: 253[1]
Launched: 9 October 1915[1]
Commissioned: 13 March 1916[1]
Fate: interned at Corunna, Spain, 29 July 1917
General characteristics [2]
Class and type: German Type UB II submarine
Displacement:
  • 263 t (259 long tons) surfaced
  • 292 t (287 long tons) submerged
Length:
Beam:
  • 4.36 m (14 ft 4 in) o/a
  • 3.85 m (13 ft) pressure hull
Draught: 3.70 m (12 ft 2 in)
Propulsion:
Speed:
  • 9.15 knots (16.95 km/h; 10.53 mph) surfaced
  • 5.81 knots (10.76 km/h; 6.69 mph) submerged
Range:
  • 6,450 nmi (11,950 km; 7,420 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph) surfaced
  • 45 nmi (83 km; 52 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
Test depth: 50 m (160 ft)
Complement: 2 officers, 21 men
Armament:
Notes: 45-second diving time
Service record
Part of:
Commanders:
  • Oblt.z.S. Ernst Voigt[3]
  • 13 March – 9 November 1916
  • Oblt.z.S. Heinz Ziemer[4]
  • 10 November 1916 – 5 February 1917
  • Oblt.z.S. Herbert Lefholz[5]
  • 6–18 February 1917
  • Oblt.z.S. Matthias Graf von Schmettow[6]
  • 19 February – 19 March 1917
  • Oblt.z.S. Hans Ewald Niemer[7]
  • 20 March – 29 July 1917
Operations: 21 patrols
Victories:

Design

A German Type UB II submarine, UB-23 had a displacement of 263 tonnes (259 long tons) when at the surface and 292 tonnes (287 long tons) while submerged. She had a total length of 36.13 m (118 ft 6 in), a beam of 4.36 m (14 ft 4 in), and a draught of 3.70 m (12 ft 2 in). The submarine was powered by two Körting six-cylinder, four-stroke diesel engines each producing a total 280 metric horsepower (280 shp; 210 kW), a Siemens-Schuckert electric motor producing 206 kilowatts (276 shp; 280 PS), and one propeller shaft. She was capable of operating at depths of up to 50 metres (160 ft).[2]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 9.15 knots (16.95 km/h; 10.53 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 5.81 knots (10.76 km/h; 6.69 mph). When submerged, she could operate for 45 nautical miles (83 km; 52 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph); when surfaced, she could travel 6,650 nautical miles (12,320 km; 7,650 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph). UB-23 was fitted with two 50 centimetres (20 in) torpedo tubes, four torpedoes, and one 5 cm (2.0 in) SK L/40 deck gun. She had a complement of twenty-one crew members and two officers and a 45-second dive time.[2]

Summary of raiding history

Date Name Nationality Tonnage[Note 2] Fate[10]
4 July 1916 Queen Bee  United Kingdom 34 Sunk
5 July 1916 Annie Anderson  United Kingdom 77 Sunk
5 July 1916 Peep O’ Day  United Kingdom 52 Sunk
6 July 1916 Girl Bessie  United Kingdom 62 Sunk
6 July 1916 Nancy Hunnam  United Kingdom 58 Sunk
6 July 1916 Newark Castle  United Kingdom 85 Sunk
6 July 1916 Petunia  United Kingdom 58 Sunk
6 July 1916 Watchful  United Kingdom 52 Sunk
24 July 1916 Mary  Norway 560 Sunk
26 July 1916 Kentigern  Norway 796 Sunk
27 July 1916 Agenda  Norway 226 Sunk
28 July 1916 Andrew Ina  United Kingdom 50 Sunk
28 July 1916 Good Design  United Kingdom 40 Sunk
28 July 1916 Jane Stewart  United Kingdom 15 Sunk
28 July 1916 Janet Overstone  United Kingdom 15 Sunk
28 July 1916 Johan  United Kingdom 49 Sunk
28 July 1916 Renown  United Kingdom 61 Sunk
28 July 1916 Speedwell  United Kingdom 11 Sunk
28 July 1916 Spero Meliora  United Kingdom 11 Sunk
28 July 1916 Volunteer  United Kingdom 15 Sunk
3 September 1916 General Archinard  France 355 Sunk
6 September 1916 Britannia  United Kingdom 48 Sunk
7 September 1916 Emma  France 19 Sunk
7 September 1916 Farfadet  France 17 Sunk
7 September 1916 Jeanne D’Arc  France 17 Sunk
7 September 1916 Leonine  France 20 Sunk
8 September 1916 Marie Louise  France 157 Sunk
8 September 1916 Mayo  Spain 1,880 Sunk
9 September 1916 Gemma  Kingdom of Italy 3,111 Sunk
9 September 1916 Remora  France 92 Sunk
21 October 1916 Julia  France 166 Sunk
21 October 1916 Snestad  Norway 2,350 Sunk
23 October 1916 Alf  Denmark 196 Sunk
23 October 1916 Antoine Allosia  France 29 Sunk
23 October 1916 Saint Pierre  France 151 Sunk
23 October 1916 Venus II  Norway 784 Sunk
26 October 1916 Saint Yves  France 165 Sunk
30 November 1916 Gaete  France 170 Sunk
2 December 1916 Harpalus  United Kingdom 1,445 Sunk
4 December 1916 Nervion  Norway 1,921 Sunk
8 December 1916 Conch  United Kingdom 5,620 Sunk
7 January 1917 Brenda  United Kingdom 249 Sunk
2 February 1917 Gabrielle  France 1,410 Sunk
31 March 1917 Hestia  Netherlands 959 Sunk
31 March 1917 Lisbeth  Norway 1,621 Sunk
4 April 1917 Trevier  Belgium 3,006 Sunk
18 April 1917 Marcel  Belgium 24 Sunk
31 May 1917 Dirigo  United States 3,004 Sunk
2 June 1917 Prudence  United Kingdom 25 Sunk
5 June 1917 Laura Ann  United Kingdom 116 Sunk
30 June 1917 Ilston  United Kingdom 2,426 Sunk
4 July 1917 Gloire à Dieu  France 419 Damaged

References

Notes

  1. "SM" stands for "Seiner Majestät" (English: His Majesty's) and combined with the U for Unterseeboot would be translated as His Majesty's Submarine.
  2. Tonnages are in gross register tons

Citations

  1. Rössler 1979, p. 64.
  2. Gröner 1991, pp. 23-25.
  3. Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Ernst Voigt (Royal House Order of Hohenzollern)". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  4. Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Heinz Ziemer". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  5. Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Herbert Lefholz". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  6. Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Matthias Graf von Schmettow (Royal House Order of Hohenzollern)". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  7. Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Hans Ewald Niemer". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  8. Bendert 2000, p. 195.
  9. "UB 23". Uboat.net. Retrieved 1 November 2012.
  10. Helgason, Guðmundur. "Ships hit by UB 23". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 29 January 2015.

Bibliography

  • Bendert, Harald (2000). Die UB-Boote der Kaiserlichen Marine, 1914-1918. Einsätze, Erfolge, Schicksal (in German). Hamburg: Verlag E.S. Mittler & Sohn GmbH. ISBN 3-8132-0713-7.
  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4.
  • Rössler, Eberhard (1979). U-Bootbau bis Ende des 1. Weltkrieges, Konstruktionen für das Ausland und die Jahre 1935 – 1945. Die deutschen U-Boote und ihre Werften (in German). I. Munich: Bernard & Graefe. ISBN 3-7637-5213-7.
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