Roman Catholic Diocese of Roskilde

The Roman-Catholic Diocese of Roskilde (Danish: Roskildes Stift) was a diocese within the Roman-Catholic Church which was established in Denmark some time before 1022 and lasted until the Lutheran Reformation.

Diocese of Roskilde

Dioecesis Roskildensis

Roskilde Stift
Roskilde Cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of Roskilde.
Location
CountryDenmark
Ecclesiastical provinceLund
MetropolitanArchdiocese of Lund
Information
DenominationRoman Catholic
Sui iuris churchLatin Church
RiteRoman Rite
Established991
Dissolved1536
CathedralRoskilde Cathedral

History

The episcopal see of the Bishop was Roskilde Cathedral but from 1167, when Bishop Absalon completed a new bishop's palace known as Absalon's Castle on the small island of Slotsholmen, he resided at the small town of Havn, which later became the present Danish capital Copenhagen.

The diocese originally included both the island of Zealand and Scania (southern Sweden, then part of Denmark), but Scania was disjoined in 1060 and initially divided into the short-lived Diocese of Dalby and the Diocese of Lund, which absorbed the first and became the Metropolitan of (southern) Scandinavia.

The diocese was dissolved with the Reformation of Denmark and replaced by the Protestant Diocese of Zealand in 1537.[1]

Successor jurisdictions

In 1868, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Copenhagen was established with St. Ansgar's Cathedral as the seat.

In 1922, the Protestant Diocese of Zealand was divided into the Diocese of Copenhagen and the Diocese of Roskilde.

Bishops of Roskilde, c. 1022 – 1536

TO BE ELABORATED

  • c. 1022-1029/30 Gerbrand (da)
  • c. 1030- late 1050s Avaco/Aage
  • c. 1060-1073/74 William of Roskilde (da)
  • 1074–1088 Svend Nordmand
  • 1088–1124 Arnold
  • 1124–1134 Peder
  • 1134–1137 Eskild
  • 1137-1138/39 Ricco/Rike
  • 1139–1158 Asker/Asser
  • 1158-1191 Absalon
  • 1191–1214 Peder Sunesen
  • 1214/15-1224/25 Peder Jacobsen
  • 1225–1249 Niels Stigsen
  • 1249-1254 Jakob Erlandsen
  • 1254-1277 Peder Bang
  • 1278–1280 Stig (uncertainty regarding name etc.)
  • 1280–1290 Ingvar (usikkerhed m.h.t. navn)
  • 1290–1300 Johannes / Johan / Jens Krag
  • 1301–1320 Oluf
  • 1321–1330 Johan / Jens Hind
  • 1330–1344 Johan Nyborg / Jens Nyborg
  • 1344–1350 Jacob Poulsen
  • 1350–1368 Henrik Gertsen
  • 1368–1395 Niels Jepsen Ulfeldt / Niels Jacobsen Ulfeldt
  • 1395-1416 Peder Jensen Lodehat
  • 1416-1431 Jens Andersen Lodehat
  • 1431–1448 Jens Pedersen Jernskæg
  • 1449–1461 Oluf Daa
  • 1461–1485 Oluf Mortensen Baden
  • 1485–1500 Niels Skave
  • 1500–1512 Johan Jepsen Ravensberg
  • 1512–1529 Lage Jørgensen Urne
  • 1529–1536 Joachim Rønnow

References

  1. "Reformationen". Gyldendal. Retrieved 28 April 2011.
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