Revolutionary Site

Revolutionary Sites (Korean: 혁명사적지; MR: Hyŏngmyŏng-sajŏkchi) are designated historical sites in North Korea.[1] The sites were designated by Kim Jong-il when he began working at the Propaganda and Agitation Department of the Workers' Party of Korea in 1966.[2][3] He would send troops all over the country to unearth sites that "were supposedly once forgotten and undiscovered".[4] Kim's goal in designating the sites was to solidify the North Korean cult of personality centered around him and his father Kim Il-sung.[2]

Revolutionary Site
Chosŏn'gŭl
Hancha
Revised RomanizationHyeongmyeong-sajeokji
McCune–ReischauerHyŏngmyŏng-sajŏkchi
Revolutionary Battle Site
Chosŏn'gŭl
Hancha
Revised RomanizationHyeongmyeong-jeonjeokji
McCune–ReischauerHyŏngmyŏng-jŏnjŏkchi

In 1988, there were 27 such sites.[5] Today, there are more than 60. Of them, 40 commemorate Kim Il-sung, 20 Kim Jong-il, and many others Kim Hyong-jik, Kim Jong-suk, Kim Hyong-gwon and other members of the Kim family.[6]

There are two categories of sites, Revolutionary Sites and Revolutionary Battle Sites. Rather than a single building or a point of interest, the sites spawn large areas.[7] Some famous Revolutionary Sites include Mangyongdae, the birthplace of Kim Il-sung, in Pyongyang,[8] and Jangjasan Revolutionary Site and Oun Revolutionary Site associated with the youth of Kim Jong-il.[7] The Mount Paektu area in particular hosts many sites.[9]

South Koreans have criticized the sites for "wip[ing] out traditional culture".[10]

List

Revolutionary Sites

Revolutionary Battle Sites

See also

References

  1. Kim 2003, p. 113.
  2. Lim Jae-Cheon (2008). Kim Jong-il's Leadership of North Korea. New York: Routledge. p. 43. ISBN 978-1-134-01712-6.
  3. Armstrong, Charles K. (2013). Tyranny of the Weak: North Korea and the World, 1950–1992. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. p. 321. ISBN 978-0-8014-6893-3.
  4. Korea & World Affairs. 32. Seoul: Research Center for Peace and Unification. 2008. p. 308. OCLC 607604144.
  5. Lee Ik-sang (1988). A Peek into North Korea. Seoul: Naewoe Press. p. 30. OCLC 604909014.
  6. "Forced To Hate". People for Successful Corean Reunification. Retrieved 11 September 2018.
  7. Lim Jae-Cheon (2015). Leader Symbols and Personality Cult in North Korea: The Leader State. New York: Routledge. p. 35. ISBN 978-1-317-56741-7.
  8. Hoare, James; Pares, Susan (2005). North Korea in the Twenty-first Century. Global Oriental. p. 180. ISBN 978-1-901903-96-6.
  9. "Two British scientists visit North Korea's mysterious Mt. Paektu volcano". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 5 September 2014. Retrieved 11 September 2018.
  10. A Comparative Study of South and North Korea. Seoul: National Unification Board. 1982. p. 129. OCLC 471661066.
  11. "Kim Jong Suk's exploits glorified". KCNA. 15 December 1997. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  12. "Changgol Revolutionary Site Draws Endless Crowd of Visitors". KCNA. 26 June 2013. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  13. Corfield 2014a, p. 26.
  14. Corfield 2014b, p. 27.
  15. "Revolutionary Sites Associated with Immortal Exploits of Kim Jong Suk". KCNA. 22 December 2003. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  16. "Chongsu Revolutionary Site Visited by Endless Stream of People, Foreigners". KCNA. 9 July 2014. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  17. "Chosan Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 1 December 2011. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  18. "Haktanggol Revolutionary Site in Pyongyang". KCNA. 20 March 2012. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  19. "Hoeryong Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 14 December 2011. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  20. "KPA Service Personnel Visit Hyangha Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 19 July 2014. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  21. "Search KCNA Archive with STALIN". nk-news.net. Retrieved 11 September 2018.
  22. "Jonsung Revolutionary Site Draws Endless Stream of Visitors". KCNA. 25 July 2014. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  23. "Junggang Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 9 July 2007. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  24. "Statues of Kim Il Sung Erected in Different Places". KCNA. 8 July 2007. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  25. Corfield 2014c, p. 72.
  26. "Events Held in DPRK to Celebrate War Victory Day". KCNA. 25 July 2011. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  27. "Phophyong Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 9 July 2007. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  28. "Phyongchon Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 1 December 1999. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  29. Corfield 2014d, p. 164.
  30. "Senior Officials in Charge of Administrative Affairs Visit Rimyongsu Revolutionary Site, Pegaebong Bivouac". KCNA. 3 March 2015. Archived from the original on 30 June 2015.
  31. "Sinpha Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 10 October 2014. Archived from the original on 13 October 2014.
  32. "Ssuksom Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 19 September 2011. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  33. "Wangjaesan Revolutionary Site". KCNA. 11 March 1999. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  34. Willoughby, Robert (2014). North Korea: The Bradt Travel Guide (Third ed.). Chalfront: Bradt Travel Guides. p. 201. ISBN 978-1-84162-476-1.
  35. "Insan Revolutionary Battle Site". KCNA. 17 December 2007. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  36. "Pochonbo Revolutionary Battle Site Draws Endless Stream of Visitors". KCNA. 3 June 2014. Archived from the original on 11 October 2014.
  37. "Pujon Revolutionary Battle Site of DPRK Introduced by ITAR-TASS". KCNA. 7 August 2012. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  38. "Officials, Members of Women's Union Visit Kim Jong Suk's Birthplace". KCNA. 24 December 2012. Archived from the original on 24 December 2014.
  39. "Samjiyon Revolutionary Battle Site". KCNA. 12 April 2000. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.
  40. "Taehongdan Revolutionary Battle Site". KCNA. 23 May 2011. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014.

Works cited

  • Corfield, Justin (2014a). "Changsan Revolutionary Site". Historical Dictionary of Pyongyang. London: Anthem Press. p. 26. ISBN 978-1-78308-341-1.
  • (2014b). "Chilgol Revolutionary Site". Historical Dictionary of Pyongyang. London: Anthem Press. pp. 27–29. ISBN 978-1-78308-341-1.
  • (2014c). "Kaeson Revolutionary Site". Historical Dictionary of Pyongyang. London: Anthem Press. pp. 72–73. ISBN 978-1-78308-341-1.
  • (2014d). "Ponghwa Revolutionary Site". Historical Dictionary of Pyongyang. London: Anthem Press. p. 164. ISBN 978-1-78308-341-1.
  • Kim, Ilpyong J. (2003). "Revolutionary Historical Sites". Historical Dictionary of North Korea. Lanham: Scarecrow Press. pp. 112–113. ISBN 978-0-8108-4331-8.
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