Polygonal masonry

Polygonal masonry is a technique of stone wall construction. True polygonal masonry is a technique wherein the visible surfaces of the stones are dressed with straight sides or joints, giving the block the appearance of a polygon.[1]

This technique is found throughout the world and sometimes corresponds to the less technical category of Cyclopean masonry.[2]

Armenia

Bolivia

Bosnia

Brazil

Bulgaria

Canada

China

Chile

Crimea

Easter Island

Ecuador

Finland

Germany

Georgia

Greece

Hungary

India

Indonesia

Iran

Italy

In Italy, polygonal masonry is particularly indicative of the region of Latium, but it occurs also in Etruria, Lucania, Samnium, and Umbria; scholars including Giuseppe Lugli have carried out studies of the technique.[3][4] Some notable sites that have fortification walls built in this technique include Norba, Signia, Alatri, Boiano, Circeo, Cosa, Alba Fucens, Palestrina, and Terracina.[5] The Porta Rosa of the ancient city of Velia employs a variant of the technique known as Lesbian masonry.[1]

Japan

Latvia

Malta

Mexico

Montenegro

Morocco

Peru

Philippines

Portugal

Romania

Russia

Spain

Sudan

Sweden

Syria

  • Barjaka

Bauda

  • Benastur Monastery
  • Churches of Sheikh Suleiman village
  • Deir Qeita
  • Kharab Shams Basilica
  • Mushabbak Basilica
  • Refade
  • Qatura

Thailand

Turkey

United Kingdom

United States

References

  1. G.R.H. Wright (23 November 2009). Ancient Building Technology, Volume 3: Construction (2 Vols). BRILL. pp. 154–. ISBN 90-04-17745-0.
  2. Carmelo G. Malacrino (2010). Constructing the Ancient World: Architectural Techniques of the Greeks and Romans. Getty Publications. pp. 97–. ISBN 978-1-60606-016-2.
  3. Frank, T. 1924. "Roman buildings of the Republic: an attempt to date them from their materials." MAAR 3.
  4. Giuseppe Lugli (1957). La Tecnica Edilizia Romana Con Particolare Riguardo a Roma E Lazio: Testo. 1. Johnson Reprint.
  5. Jeffrey Alan Becker (2007). The Building Blocks of Empire: Civic Architecture, Central Italy, and the Roman Middle Republic. ProQuest. pp. 109–. ISBN 978-0-549-55847-7.
  • P. Gros. 1996. L'architecture romaine: du début du IIIe siècle av. J.-C. à la fin du Haut-Empire. 2 v. Paris: Picard.
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