Pennsylvania State Senate

The Pennsylvania State Senate is the upper house of the Pennsylvania General Assembly, the Pennsylvania state legislature. The State Senate meets in the State Capitol building in Harrisburg. Senators are elected for four year terms, staggered every two years such that half of the seats are contested at each election.[2] Even numbered seats and odd numbered seats are contested in separate election years. The President Pro Tempore of the Senate becomes the Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania in the event of the sitting Lieutenant Governor's removal, resignation or death. In this case the President Pro Tempore and Lieutenant Governor would be the same person.[3] The Pennsylvania Senate has been meeting since 1791.

Pennsylvania State Senate
Pennsylvania General Assembly
Type
Type
Term limits
None
History
New session started
January 1, 2019
Leadership
John Fetterman (D)
since January 15, 2019
Joe Scarnati (R)
since January 2, 2007
Majority Leader
Jake Corman (R)
since January 6, 2015
Minority Leader
Jay Costa (D)
since January 4, 2011
Structure
Seats50
Political groups
Majority

Minority

Length of term
4 years
AuthorityArticle II, Pennsylvania Constitution
Salary$88,610/year[1]
Elections
Last election
November 6, 2018
(25 seats)
Next election
November 3, 2020
(25 seats)
RedistrictingLegislative Control
Meeting place
State Senate Chamber
Pennsylvania State Capitol
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Website
Pennsylvania State Senate

The President of the Senate is the Lieutenant Governor, who has no vote except in the event of an otherwise tie vote. As of September 2019, the Senate consists of 27 Republicans, 22 Democrats.

Senate leadership

President of the Senate: John Fetterman (D)
President Pro Tem of the Senate: Joe Scarnati (R)

Majority party (R) Leadership position Minority party (D)
Jake Corman Floor Leader Jay Costa
John Gordner Whip Anthony H. Williams
Bob Mensch Caucus Chairman Wayne D. Fontana
Ryan Aument Caucus Secretary Larry Farnese
Pat Browne Appropriations Committee Chairman Vincent Hughes
Dave Argall Policy Committee Chairman Lisa Boscola
Kim Ward Caucus Administrator John Blake

Composition

Historical sessions

Affiliation Party
(shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Republican Democratic Vacant
1995–1996 session 29 21 50 0
1997–1998 session 30 20 50 0
1999–2000 session 30 20 50 0
2001–2002 session 30 20 50 0
2003–2004 session 29 21 50 0
2005–2006 session 30 20 50 0
2007–2008 session 29 21 50 0
2009–2010 session 30 20 50 0
2011–2012 session 30 20 50 0
2013–2014 session 27 23 50 0
2015–2016 session 30 20 50 0
2016–2017 session 31 19 50 0
2017–2018 session 34 16 50 0
2018–2019 session 28 22 50 0
2019–2020 session 27 22 49 1

Current session

Affiliation Party
(shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Republican Ind Democratic Vacant
Begin 2019[4] 28 0 21 49 1
February 28, 2019[5] 26 47 3
April 2, 2019[6] 22 48 2
May 21, 2019[7] 28 50 0
September 18, 2019[8] 27 49 1
November 19, 2019[9] 1 21
Latest voting share 57.1% 42.9%

Membership

The Senate is made up of 50 members who are elected by district. In 2012, a State Senate district had an average population of 254,047 residents.

List of current members

District Representative Party Residence Counties represented Term ends First elected
1Larry FarneseDemPhiladelphiaPhiladelphia20202008
2Christine TartaglioneDemPhiladelphiaPhiladelphia20221994
3Sharif StreetDemPhiladelphiaPhiladelphia20202016
4Arthur L. Haywood IIIDemPhiladelphiaMontgomery, Philadelphia20222014
5John SabatinaDemPhiladelphiaPhiladelphia20202015
6Tommy TomlinsonRepBensalem TownshipBucks20221994
7Vincent HughesDemPhiladelphiaMontgomery, Philadelphia20201994
8Anthony WilliamsDemPhiladelphiaDelaware, Philadelphia20221998
9Tom KillionRepMiddletown TownshipChester, Delaware20202016
10Steven SantarsieroDemLower Makefield TownshipBucks20222018
11Judy SchwankDemFleetwoodBerks20202011
12Maria CollettDemLower Gwynedd Township Bucks, Montgomery20222018
13Scott MartinRepWest Lampeter TownshipLancaster20202016
14John YudichakInd.Plymouth TownshipCarbon, Luzerne20222010
15John DiSantoRepSusquehanna TownshipDauphin, Perry20202016
16Pat BrowneRepAllentownLehigh20222005
17Daylin LeachDemUpper Merion TownshipDelaware, Montgomery20202008
18Lisa BoscolaDemBethlehem TownshipLehigh, Northampton20221998
19Andy DinnimanDemWest Whiteland TownshipChester20202006
20Lisa BakerRepLehman TownshipLuzerne, Pike, Susquehanna, Wayne, Wyoming20222006
21Scott HutchinsonRepOil CityButler, Clarion, Forest, Venango, Warren20202012
22John P. BlakeDemArchbaldLackawanna, Luzerne, Monroe20222010
23Gene YawRepLoyalsock TownshipBradford, Lycoming, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Union20202008
24Bob MenschRepMarlborough TownshipBerks, Bucks, Montgomery20222009
25Joe ScarnatiRepBrockwayCameron, Clearfield, Clinton, Elk, Jefferson, McKean, Potter, Tioga20202000
26Tim KearneyDemSwarthmoreChester, Delaware20222018
27John GordnerRepBerwickColumbia, Luzerne, Montour, Northumberland, Snyder20202003
28Kristin Phillips-HillRep York Township York20222018
29David Argall, Ph.D.RepRush TownshipBerks, Schuylkill20202009
30Judy WardRepHollidaysburg Blair, Cumberland, Franklin, Fulton, Huntingdon20222018
31Mike ReganRepCarroll TownshipCumberland, York20202016
32Patrick J. StefanoRepBullskin TownshipFayette, Somerset, Westmoreland20222014
33Douglas V. MastrianoRepGreene TownshipAdams, Cumberland, Franklin, York20202019[note 1]
34Jake CormanRepBenner TownshipCentre, Huntingdon, Juniata, Mifflin20221998
35Wayne LangerholcRepJohnstownBedford, Cambria, Clearfield20202016
36Ryan AumentRepEast Hempfield TownshipLancaster20222014
37Pam IovinoDem Mt. LebanonAllegheny, Washington20202019[note 2]
38Lindsey WilliamsDemWest ViewAllegheny20222018
39Kim WardRepHempfield TownshipWestmoreland20202008
40Mario ScavelloRepMount PoconoMonroe, Northampton20222014
41Joe PittmanRepIndianaArmstrong, Butler, Indiana, Westmoreland20202019[note 3]
42Wayne FontanaDemPittsburghAllegheny20222005
43Jay CostaDemForest HillsAllegheny20201996
44Katie MuthDemRoyersfordBerks, Chester, Montgomery20222018
45Jim BrewsterDemMcKeesportAllegheny, Westmoreland20202010
46Camera BartolottaRepMonongahelaBeaver, Greene, Washington20222014
47Elder VogelRepNew Sewickley TownshipBeaver, Butler, Lawrence20202008
48VacantDauphin, Lebanon, York20222006[note 4]
49Dan LaughlinRepMillcreek TownshipErie20202016
50Michele BrooksRepJamestownCrawford, Erie, Mercer, Warren20222014
  1. Elected in special election on May 21, 2019 (2019-05-21), to fill unexpired term.
  2. Elected in special election on April 2, 2019 (2019-04-02), to fill unexpired term.
  3. Elected in special election on May 21, 2019 (2019-05-21), to fill unexpired term.
  4. Senator Mike Folmer resigned on September 18, 2019 (2019-09-18).

Committee Assignments

Standing CommitteeMajority MembershipMinority Membership
Aging & Youth
Agriculture & Rural Affairs
Appropriations
Banking & Insurance
Communications & Technology
Community, Economic & Recreational Development
Consumer Protection & Professional Licensure
Education
Environmental Resources & Energy
Finance
Game & Fisheries
Health & Human Services
Intergovernmental Operations
Judiciary
Labor & Industry
Law & Justice
Local Government
Rules & Executive Nominations
State Government
Transportation
Urban Affairs & Housing
Veterans Affairs & Emergency Preparednesss

[10]

Past composition of the Senate

See also

References

  1. The Pennsylvania Manual, pp. 3–7.
  2. Article II, section 3, Pennsylvania Constitution.
  3. Article IV, section 14, Pennsylvania Constitution.
  4. Republican Guy Reschenthaler (District 37) resigned before the beginning of the session after being sworn into the 116th United States Congress.
  5. Republicans Richard Alloway (District 33) and Donald C. White (District 41) resigned.
  6. Democrat Pam Iovino elected to succeed Reschenthaler.
  7. Republicans Douglas V. Mastriano (District 33) and Joe Pittman (District 41) elected to succeed Alloway and White, respectively.
  8. Republican Mike Folmer (District 48) resigned.
  9. John Yudichak (District 14) switched parties from Democratic to Independent and began caucusing with the Republican majority.
  10. "Committees of the Senate". Pennsylvania State Senate. The Senate of Pennsylvania. Retrieved 17 December 2019.

Sources

This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.