PMZ-A-750

The PMZ-A-750 (Russian: ПМЗ-А-750) was a pre-World War II heavy motorcycle produced in the USSR by the PMZ factory.

PMZ-A-750
ManufacturerPMZ
Production1934–1938
AssemblyPodolsk
Engine746 cc, four-stroke V-twin[1]
Bore / stroke70×97 mm (2.8×3.8 in)[1]
Compression ratio5.0
Top speed95 km/h[1]
Power15 hp (11 kW) at 3600 rpm[1]
Ignition typeElectrical (6 V battery)[1]
TransmissionMultiple-plate, dry, 3-speed manual[1]
SuspensionSpring, 8 plates with damper (front), rigid (rear)
BrakesDrum type[1]
Tires4x19 in[1]
Wheelbase1395 mm[1]
DimensionsL: 2085 mm[1]
W: 890 mm[1]
H: 950 mm[1]
Seat height820 mm[1]
Weight206 kg[1] (dry)
Fuel capacity18 L[1]

History

The PMZ-A-750 was the first heavy motorcycle manufactured in the Soviet Union.[2] It was designed in the early 1930s in the NATI (Scientific Auto & Tractor Institute) in Moscow, for a request by the Supreme Soviet of the National Economy. A main designer was Pyotr Mozharov, who had been responsible for early IZh motorcycle prototypes, and practised in German BMW works. The new motorcycle was initially designated NATI-A-750, and like Harley-Davidson motorcycles had a V-twin engine.[2]

It was initially planned to produce the motorcycle in IZh works in Izhevsk, and first four were built there, completed by 1 May 1933.[2] After trials, the Soviet Heavy Industry Ministry decided to start production at Podol'skiy Mekhanicheskiy Zavod (Podolsk Mechanical Works) in Podolsk, which had not manufactured motorcycles before. By July 1934 first nine motorcycles were built there.[2] The production lasted until 1938[2] (other information: 1939[3]), and approximately 4600 were built in total.[1][3]

These motorcycles were used by the Red Army as well as civilian users, both in solo or sidecar combination versions.[1]

References

  1. PMZ-А-750. motos-of-war.ru
  2. Kurikhin, Oleg (1999). "V serii tiyazholye". Tekhnika Molodezhi, Nr. 5.
  3. PMZ-A-750 in kolyaska.pl (in Polish), access date 28-11-2015
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