Night of the Demons 2

Night of the Demons 2 is a 1994 American horror film directed by Brian Trenchard-Smith and starring Amelia Kinkade, Cristi Harris, Rick Peters, Jennifer Rhodes and Christine Taylor. It is the sequel to Night of the Demons and was released on home video in 1994 by Republic Pictures Home Video. Lionsgate released it on DVD in 2007; Olive Films released a widescreen DVD and a first time Blu-ray release on February 19, 2013. The film was followed by the 1997 sequel Night of the Demons 3.

Night of the Demons 2
Theatrical release poster
Directed byBrian Trenchard-Smith
Produced byJeff Geoffray
Written byJoe Augustyn
James Penzi
StarringMerle Kennedy
Amelia Kinkade
Cristi Harris
Rick Peters
Jennifer Rhodes
Christine Taylor
Music byJim Manzie
CinematographyDavid Lewis
Edited byDaniel Duncan
Distributed byParamount Pictures
Republic Pictures
Blue Rider Productions
Release date
  • May 13, 1994 (1994-05-13)
Running time
95 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$1.4 million[1] or $2.7 million[2]

Plot

Six years have passed since the events at Hull House on Halloween, and many of the bodies left at Hull House were recovered except for Angela's; rumor persists she descended bodily into Hell. As it turns out, her parents committed suicide five years later after receiving a Halloween card with Angela's signature. A year later her sister Melissa, nicknamed 'Mouse' (Merle Kennedy), is now staying at St. Rita's Academy, a Catholic boarding school for troubled teenagers. She frequently has nightmares about her sister. Rumors spread around the school regarding Mouse, started by the school bully, Shirley (Zoe Trilling). However, the head nun at the school, Sister Gloria (Jennifer Rhodes), tries to put an end to it.

However, Shirley, after getting banned from the school Halloween dance for wrestling on the tennis courts with Kurt (Ladd York) decides to have her own Halloween party at Hull House complete with Mouse and some ritual sacrifice she learns from stealing a demonic ritual book from the school brain, Perry (Robert Jayne). Along with her boyfriend Rick (Rick Peters) and Z-Boy (Darin Heames), she tricks Johnny (Johnny Moran), Johnny's girlfriend, Bibi (Cristi Harris), and Bibi's friend Terri (Christine Taylor) to get Mouse to go with them to Hull House, awakening a now demonized Angela. After some bizarre incidents, the group flees the house, minus Z-Boy, who is possessed and raped by Angela in the attic.

Bibi brings a tube of lipstick out of the house which takes on a hellish life of its own. It quickly possesses Shirley and, one by one, the teenagers are possessed and/or murdered by demonic Angela. Her plan is to sacrifice Mouse to the Devil to prove her devotion to him. Sister Gloria, Johnny, Bibi, Father Bob (Rod McCary) and Perry return to Hull House in an attempt to rescue Melissa. Once arriving at the house, the five become separated and Father Bob is quickly killed by the demonic Rick. Johnny is saved by Perry from the demonic Kurt. Unfortunately, Perry is killed by Z-Boy. With the holy water the group brought, Bibi, Johnny and Sister Gloria kill the remaining demons, except for Angela.

After finishing off the demons, the three survivors find Melissa sleeping on an altar. Angela and Sister Gloria debate on what true faith is with Angela stating "Real faith can move mountains, your faith can't even move a mouse." Angela then decapitates Sister Gloria but the sister actually pulls her head down into her habit and survives. With one last ruse to save Melissa and the others, Sister Gloria agrees to take her place on the altar. Angela then hands the sword to Melissa, promising her a great source of power if she kills Sister Gloria. However, Melissa turns the tables and stabs Angela instead. Sister Gloria finishes Angela off with a super soaker filled with holy water. As the four try to leave, they are confronted again by Angela, who has taken the form of a Lamia. Angela attacks them but Johnny manages to kick a hole in the wall in the shape of a cross. The cross-shaped-sunlight falls upon Angela and she explodes. With Angela and her minions dead, Sister Gloria, Melissa, Bibi and Johnny leave the house and return to the school where they are greeted by everyone there. But before the film ends, one student is then seen finding the demonic lipstick which turns into a snake and attacks her.

Cast

Release

The film was given a limited theatrical release in California by Republic Pictures in May 1994.[3]

Reception

Dread Central praised the film, giving it four out of five blades and stating the movie was "gory, funny, and the perfect treat for a dark and stormy night"[4] In Generation Multiplex: The Image of Youth in Contemporary American Cinema, Timothy Shary wrote that while both films paired teen sexuality and demonic possession together, the teen characters in the sequel were more developed than in its predecessor.[5] JoBlo.com criticized the film, stating that it "has a crappy storyline and no scares" but praised the movie's gore and the acting of Cristi Harris.[6] DVD Verdict also praised the movie's gore as well as the comedic parts, citing the character of Sister Gloria as a highlight.[7] The Los Angeles Times called the film "a smart, amusing horror picture boasting a capable cast".[8]

References

  1. Aaron Hills, "The Wizard of Ozploitation", IFC Film, July 29, 2009 accessed February 8, 2013
  2. Trenchard-Smith, Brian (11 August 2001). "HOLLYWOOD SURVIVOR". Daily Telegraph.
  3. ""Night of the Demons 2" (Republic) opened at the Mann Village to $1,689 and the Mann Chinese Triplex to $3,148". varietyultimate.com: Variety. May 17, 1994. Retrieved November 14, 2015. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  4. Night of the Demons 2 (DVD) Dread Central
  5. Shary, Timothy. Generation Multiplex: The Image of Youth in Contemporary American Cinema. University of Texas Press, 2002, p 172
  6. Night of the Demons 2 (1994) JoBlo.com
  7. Night of the Demons 2 DVD Verdict
  8. Thomas, Kevin. Movie Review `Demons 2' a Smart, Sexy Horror Show Los Angeles Times. Calendar; PART-F; Entertainment Desk. May 13, 1994. p 13
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