New Hampshire historical markers

The State of New Hampshire has, since 1958,[1] placed historical markers at locations that are deemed significant to New Hampshire history. The New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources (DHR) and the Department of Transportation (DOT) are jointly responsible for the historical marker program.[2] The program is authorized by RSA 227 C:4, X, and RSA 236:40 to 44.[3] As of November 2018, there were 259 markers across the state,[4] and at least three new markers have been added since then.[5]

Markers

New Hampshire's historical markers are green with white text; the state seal sits atop each one. Generally, there is a title line and up to 12 lines of text, each of which has no more than 45 characters.[3] Some markers note the year they were installed—it may be centered under the main text (early 2000s to present) or right-justified under the main text (1980s through early 2000s), although there are some visible exceptions—while on older markers it is not listed.[6]

Any individual or group may propose a marker to commemorate significant New Hampshire places, persons, or events. Requests must be accompanied by a petition for the marker, signed by at least 20 New Hampshire citizens.[3] The state's Division of Historical Resources has final decision rights for all markers.[3] Markers funded by the state must be located along a state highway.[3] A "co-operative marker," which must be funded by whomever proposes it, can be located on a locally maintained road or on municipal land.[3] As of July 2019, the state's website lists the cost of a marker at $1500 to $1800.[3]

Markers generally have the same text on both sides, with some exceptions. Marker number one in Pittsburg only has text on one side. Marker number 122 in Carroll features the Mount Washington Hotel on one side and the Bretton Woods Monetary Conference on the other; several other markers also have different topics on each side. A few markers appear to have unique layouts: number 127 in Portsmouth provides a two-part narrative on a single subject, with a "see other side" directive to the reader; number 208 in Manchester has one side in English, and the same information on the other side in French; and number 236 in Concord discusses Civil War mustering on one side, and lists specific regiments on the other.

List of markers

The following pages list each marker, ordered by marker numbers as chronologically assigned by the state.[4] Pages each contain 25 entries, noting each marker's city or town, and providing the text on the marker.

Markers by community

The below table alphabetically lists each city or town that has at least one historical marker.[7] Detail of individual markers can be viewed via the above list of markers. The capital city of Concord has the most markers, with 13.

City or town Marker numbers
Allenstown193, 205, 211, 230
Alton164
Amherst3
Andover54
Antrim178, 228
Ashland100, 163
Barnstead201
Barrington96, 212
Bartlett109
Bath121, 217
Bean's Grant45
Bedford102
Belmont235
Bennington153
Benton245
Berlin159, 215, 254, 255
Bethlehem198, 218, 257
Boscawen49, 256
Bow36
Bradford108
Brentwood180, 249
Campton196
Canaan21, 246
Candia141, 237
Carroll30, 87, 122, 233
Center Harbor7
Charlestown2, 117, 177
Chester14, 139
Chesterfield60, 95, 216
Claremont41, 57, 188
Clarksville115
Concord66, 67, 80, 105, 110, 125, 128, 147, 148, 175, 184, 236, 238
Conway38
Cornish16, 76, 134, 158
Danville169, 258
Deerfield25, 145, 183, 214
Derry48, 58, 126
Dixville171
Dover51, 92, 165
Dunbarton111
Durham8, 50, 89, 154
Easton200
Effingham83
Enfield202, 241
Epsom199
Exeter32, 97, 131, 161, 240
Farmington98
Fitzwilliam99
Francestown23, 43
Franconia9
Franklin91, 129
Fremont142, 156, 157, 167, 170
Gilford118, 239
Gilmanton17
Gilsum168
Goshen140
Grafton251, 252
Greenfield130
Greenland113
Hampstead247
Hampton28, 119
Hampton Falls37
Hanover261
Hart's Location186, 213
Haverhill56, 104, 136, 160, 190
Hebron223
Hill162
Hillsborough65, 107, 203
Hinsdale112, 204
Holerness39
Hollis260
Hooksett132
Hopkinton195
Jaffrey13
Jefferson19, 152, 229
Keene69, 86, 226
Kingston46
Laconia135, 172
Lancaster84, 173, 219
Lempster182
Lincoln224
Lisbon70
Littleton71, 185
Londonderry166
Loudon15
Madison207
Manchester124, 208, 225
Mason35
Merrimack29, 79
Milan227
Milford133
New Boston146
New Castle4
New Durham222
New Ipswich10, 101, 137
Newbury81
Newington151
Newmarket209
Newport6, 106
North Hampton62
Northwood24, 181
Nottingham259
Orford33
Ossipee20
Pelham176
Pembroke144, 187, 250
Peterborough206, 210, 244
Pinkham's Grant11
Pittsburg1
Pittsfield197
Plainfield77
Plymouth179, 189
Portsmouth75, 114, 127, 194, 234
Randolph220
Raymond85
Richmond59
Rindge138
Rochester42, 191
Rollinsford88
Rumney55, 174
Rye18, 63, 78
Salem72, 221, 253
Sandown26
Sandwich82, 248
Seabrook103, 120
Sharon68
Stark150
Stewartstown47, 64
Stoddard27, 52
Stratford34
Sugar Hill73
Surry93
Sutton44
Swanzey22, 232
Tamworth31, 90, 155
Temple12
Tilton149, 262
Wakefield5, 123
Walpole61
Warner243
Warren231
Washington94
Weare143, 192
Westmoreland74
Wilmot40
Wolfeboro53, 116, 242

denotes markers with a different inscription on each side

References

  1. Brindley, Michael (January 24, 2014). "Marking History: Republic Of Indian Stream In Pittsburg". nhpr.org. Retrieved July 5, 2019.
  2. "New Hampshire Historical Highway Markers". nh.gov. New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources. Retrieved July 3, 2019.
  3. "What You Need To Know To Request A New Hampshire State Highway Historical Marker". nh.gov. New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources. Retrieved July 3, 2019.
  4. "List of Markers by Marker Number" (PDF). nh.gov. New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources. November 2, 2018. Retrieved July 5, 2019.
  5. Pauwels, Linda (October 24, 2019). "The unveiling of the new historical marker #0262 in Tilton today near Riverfront Park as part of the 150th anniversary celebrations". Facebook. Retrieved October 29, 2019.
  6. "New Hampshire Historical Markers". Retrieved July 6, 2019 via Flickr.
  7. "List of Markers by Town" (PDF). nh.gov. New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources. November 2, 2018. Retrieved July 5, 2019.

Further reading

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