Nelson H. H. Graburn

Nelson H. H. Graburn, is a Professor Emeritus in Sociocultural Anthropology at University of California, Berkeley.

Nelson H. H. Graburn
BornNovember 25, 1936[1]
London, United Kingdom
NationalityBritish
OccupationProfessor
Years active1950s - present
Known forCanadian Inuit social and cultural anthropology, kinship, art, tourism, Japan
Academic background
EducationB.A. Natural Sciences and Social Anthropology, Clare College (1958)
M.A. Anthropology, McGill University (1960)
Ph.D. Anthropology University of Chicago(1963)
Alma materUniversity of Chicago
ThesisTaqagmiut Eskimo Kinship Terminology (1963[1])
Doctoral advisorDavid M. Schneider[2]
InfluencesWilliam E. Willmott[2]
Academic work
DisciplineSociocultural Anthropology
InstitutionsCanadian Arctic, Japan
Notable worksEthnic Tourist Arts: Cultural Expressions from the Fourth World (1987)
InfluencedMari Lyn Salvador[3]

Education

Graburn studied as King's School, Canterbury from 1950-55. He earned his B.A. in Natural Sciences and Social Anthropology at Clare College in 1958 and his M.A. Anthropology at McGill University, Montreal in 1960. He completed his Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of Chicago in 1963.[4] His PhD research was partially was based on research by the Northern Co-ordination and Research Centre.[5]

Career

Graburn began teaching at Berkeley in 1964. He had visiting appointments at a number of national museums globally including the National Museum of Civilization in Ottawa, Canada Le Centre des Hautes Etudes Touristiques, Aix-en-Provence, the National Museum of Ethnology (Minpaku) in Osaka, the Research Center for Korean Studies, Kyushu National University, Fukuoka, the International Institute for Culture, Tourism and Development, London Metropolitan University, the UF Rio Grande del Sol, Porto Alegre, Brazil and he has lectured at twenty-four Chinese universities. He is currently a Professor Emeritus in Sociocultural Anthropology at University of California, Berkeley.[6]

His areas of research include "social and cultural anthropology, kinship, art, tourism, Japan, circumpolar, China, Heritage, and Inuit."[7]

Inuit

Graburn's Ph.D. was based on materials gathered in 1959 in the Inuit hamlet of Salluit, then known as, Sugluk, in Quebec, Canada, on Sugluk Inlet near Hudson Strait. He had fellowships from McGill-Carnegie Arctic Institute and Canada Council. The next year he spent three months in Kimmirut, then known as Lake Harbour, Baffin Island continuing his research with the Inuit. The data from the Sugluk fieldwork was the basis for his MA. The data from both field trips was also submitted as reports in 1960 and 1963 to the Canadian Government as part of the newly formed Northern Coordination and Research Centre.[2]:ii His dissertation, "Taqagmiut Eskimo Kinship Terminology" (1963) was reproduced as a contribution to the knowledge of the North and republished by the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs, Canada (INAC) in Ottawa, Canada in 1964.[2] These reports were cited in the "Qikiqtani Truth Commission Community Histories 1950–1975".[8]

In the 1960s he had a visiting appointment with the National Museum of Civilization in Ottawa, Canada. One of his first books was Eskimos without Igloos which was published in 1969.[9]

By the early 2000s, he focused his research on contemporary Inuit arts which included "urban Inuit" artists. Graburn collaborated with Avataq, in Nunavik, an Inuit cultural organization. He also worked with Inuit institutions in Iqaluit, Nunavut "on aspects of cultural preservation and autonomy".[6]

Japan

In 1974, Graburn began his ethnographic research in Japan. He has a visiting appointment with the National Museum of Ethnology (Minpaku) in Osaka. He co-edited the 2007 publication entitled Multiculturalism in the New Japan: Crossing the Boundaries Within.[10] Japan Studies called it a "valuable addition to the increasing literature on Japanese multiculturalism which has challenged the long-held homogeneous Japan thesis."[11]

Selected publications

His most highly cited works include his 1977 publication, Tourism: the Sacred Journey[12] and his 1976 book entitled Ethnic Tourist Arts: Cultural Expressions from the Fourth World.[13] Graburn's concept of "tourism as a "sacred journey"—a "structurally-necessary, ritualized" break from routines during which it is taboo for the tourist to work"—contributed to the new area of anthropology of tourism that was emerging in the 1970s.[14]:3

In Ethnic Tourist Arts, Graburn... sought to provide a "more coherent framework for evaluating not only the art and artisans but, perhaps more importantly, the peculiar ethnoaesthetic context in which both creator and consumer come to evaluate each other."[15]

References

  1. Graburn, Nelson H. H. (November 18, 1963). Taqagmiut Eskimo Kinship Terminology (Thesis). University of Chicago. ProQuest 302115230.
  2. Graburn, Nelson H. H. (January 1964). Taqagmiut Eskimo Kinship Terminology (PDF) (Thesis). Ottawa, Ontario: Department of Indian and Northern Affairs, Canada (INAC). Retrieved October 24, 2017.
  3. Salvador, Mari Lyn. Cuando Hablan Los Santos: Contemporary Santero Traditions from Northern New Mexico. Albuquerque: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. 1995: xi
  4. "CV Nelson Graburn" (PDF). CRIA - Research Network in Anthropology. 2007. Retrieved October 24, 2017.
  5. Krupnik, Igor, ed. (February 16, 2016). Early Inuit Studies: Themes and Transitions, 1850s-1980s. Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press. p. 592. ISBN 978-1935623700. Retrieved October 24, 2017. The book is a "synthesis" of the "18th Inuit Studies Conference held in Washington, DC on October 24–28, 2012." The "Forward" by Graburn is entitled "From 1959 to 2014: Personal Observations on 55 Years of Change". The editor of the book, Igor Krupnik is "curator of Arctic and Northern Ethnology collections at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C."
  6. "Nelson H. H. Graburn". biography. University of California, Berkeley. nd. Retrieved October 24, 2017. Graburn had "visiting appointments at the National Museum of Civilization, Ottawa, Le Centre des Hautes Etudes Touristiques, Aix-en-Provence, the National Museum of Ethnology (Minpaku) in Osaka, the Research Center for Korean Studies, Kyushu National University, Fukuoka, the International Institute for Culture, Tourism and Development, London Metropolitan University, the UF Rio Grande del Sol, Porto Alegre, Brazil."
  7. "Nelson H. H. Graburn". Profile update. Berkeley Research. nd. Retrieved October 24, 2017.
  8. Qikiqtani Truth Commission Community Histories 1950–1975 (Report). Kimmirut: Qikiqtani Inuit Association. April 2014. p. 49. ISBN 978-1-927095-62-1.
  9. Eskimos without Igloos. Boston: Little, Brown. 1969.
  10. Graburn, Nelson H.; Ertl, John; Tierney, R. Kenji, eds. (2007). Multiculturalism in the New Japan: Crossing the Boundaries Within. Asian Anthropologies. 6. Berghahn Books. p. 264. ISBN 978-1-84545-226-1.
  11. "Review of "Multiculturalism in the New Japan: Crossing the Boundaries Within"". Berkeley.
  12. Graburn, Nelson H. H. (1977), Tourism: the Sacred Journey
  13. Graburn, Nelson H. H., ed. (June 1977). Ethnic Tourist Arts: Cultural Expressions from the Fourth World. Berkeley: University of California Press. p. 444. ISBN 0520029496.
  14. Jules-Rosette, Bennetta (1984). The Messages of Tourist Art: An African Semiotic System in Comparative. ISBN 978-1-4757-1827-0.
  15. Dark, Philip J.C. (1978). "Review of Ethnic Tourist Arts: Cultural Expressions from the Fourth World". American Anthropologist. 80 (2): 400–401. doi:10.1525/aa.1978.80.2.02a00300.
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