Moscow Governorate

Moscow Governorate (Russian: Московская губерния; pre-reform Russian: Московская губернія), or the Government of Moscow, was an administrative division (a guberniya) of the Tsardom of Russia, the Russian Empire, and the Russian SFSR, which existed in 1708–1929.

Moscow Governorate
Московская губерния
Governorate of Russian Empire
1708–1929

Map of Moscow Governorate
CapitalMoscow
Population 
 1897
2,430,581
History 
 Established
1708
 Disestablished
1929
Succeeded by
Moscow Oblast

History

Moscow Governorate, together with seven other governorates, was established on December 29 [O.S. December 18], 1708, by Tsar Peter the Great's edict.[1] As with the rest of the governorates, neither the borders nor internal subdivisions of Moscow Governorate were defined; instead, the territory was defined as a set of cities and the lands adjacent to those cities.[2]

Subdivisions

Cities included into Moscow Governorate at the time of its establishment[1]
#City#City#City
1. Moscow 14. Lyubim 27. Suzdal
2. Aleksin 15. Medyn 28. Tarussa
3. Borovsk 16. Mikhaylov 29. Tsarev Borisov
4. Dedilov 17. Mozhaysk 30. Tula
5. Dmitrov 18. Obolensk 31. Veneva
6. Gremyachey 19. Pecherniki 32. Vereya
7. Kaluga 20. Pereslavl Ryazanskoy 33. Volodimir
8. Klin 21. Pereslavl Zaleskoy 34. Volokolamsk
9. Kolomna 22. Pronsk 35. Yaroslavets Maly
10. Koshira 23. Rostov 36. Yepifan
11. Kostroma 24. Ruza 37. Yuryev Polskoy
12. Krapivna 25. Serpukhov 38. Zaraysk
13. Lukh 26. Shuya 39. Zvenigorod

The governorate underwent numerous changes in the following years, and was finally abolished on January 14, 1929 when modern Moscow Oblast was created.

Demography

Language

  • Population by mother tongue according to the Imperial census of 1897.
Language Number percentage (%) males females
Russian 2,371,102 97.5 1,181,296 1,189,806
German 19,116 0.7 9,225 9,891
Polish 10,960 0.4 7,676 3,284
Jewish 5,756 0.2 3,795 1,961
Ukrainian 5,506 0.2 4,838 668
Tatar 5,469 0.2 4,492 977
French 2,621 0.1 1,035 1,586
Armenian 1,633 0.0 1,201 432
Belarusian 1,292 0.0 948 344
English 1,135 0.0 559 576
Latvian 1,018 0.0 731 287
Lithuanian 690 0.0 600 90
Czech 636 0.0 397 239
Gypsy 511 0.0 249 262
Estonian 396 0.0 243 153
Italian 374 0.0 220 154
Greek 292 0.0 241 51
Swedish 228 0.0 117 111
Chuvash 152 0.0 147 5
Komi 148 0.0 144 4
Bulgarian 110 0.0 100 10
Other 1,436 0.0 1,013 423
Total 2,430,581 100.0 1,219,267 1,211,314

Religion

  • According to the Imperial census of 1897.[3]
Religion Number percentage (%) males females
Pravoslavs[4] 2,272,145 93.5 1,139,289 1,132,856
Old Believers and others split from Pravoslavs 99,825 4.1 44,682 55,143
Lutherans 21,437 0.8 10,701 10,736
Roman Catholic 17,670 0.7 11,497 6,173
Judaism 8,704 0.3 5,400 3,304
Islam 5,605 0.2 4,678 927
Reformed 2,218 0.0 1,088 1,130
Armenian Gregorians 1,640 0.0 1,188 452
Anglicans 838 0.0 441 397
Karaites 347 0.0 210 137
Armenian Catholic Church 25 0.0 18 7
Buddhists, Lamaists 11 0.0 11 0
Mennonites 3 0.0 3 0
Other: Christian denominations 103 0.0 52 51
Other: non-Christians 10 0.0 9 1
Total 2,430,581 100.0 1,219,267 1,211,314

References

Further reading

 Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Moscow (government)". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.

This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.