Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland

Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland began in 1876. Its main purpose is to disseminate scientific knowledge of the Mineral Sciences (mineralology) as it may be applied to the fields of crystallography, geochemistry, petrology, environmental science and economic geology. In support of this vision, the society publishes scientific journals, books and monographs. It also organizes and sponsors scientific meetings, and the society connects with other societies which have similar scientific interests. Some of these other societies are the International Mineralogical Association, the European Mineralogical Union, the Mineralogical Society of America, the Mineralogical Association of Canada, the Geological Society of London, IOM3, and the Microbiology Society.[1]

Publications

The Society publishes a variety of book series, and these are entitled the "Landmark Series", the "Mineralogical Society Special Series", and the "Monograph series". The organization also publishes scientific journals entitled Mineralogical Magazine, Clay Minerals, and the EMU Notes in Mineralogy and from 1920-2008 the Mineralogical Abstracts bibliographic database.

Awards and honours

Aside from the denotation of senior members or Fellows of the Society that are permitted to use the post-nomial 'FMinSoc',[2] the Society recognizes distinguished accomplishments through medals, lectures, honorary fellowships and awards:

  • The Mineralogical Society-Schlumberger Award, given since 1990 through the generous sponsorship of Schlumberger Cambridge Research, is the most prestigious honour bestowed by the Society. It is awarded to recognize scientific excellence in mineralogy and its applications.
  • The Max Hey Medal, given since 1993, has the purpose to recognize research of excellence carried out by young workers, within 15 years of the award of their first degree,. The award is named in honour of Max H. Hey (1904-1984), eminent British mineralogist.
  • The Collins Medal, given since 2010, is awarded annually to a scientist who has made an outstanding contribution to Mineral Sciences. The award is named after Joseph Henry Collins (1841–1916), mineralogist and one of the founding members of the Society.
  • Mineralogical Society Lectures: Hallimond Lecture, George Brown Lecture, Society Distinguished Lecturer Programme.
  • Honorary Membership/fellowship.
  • Undergraduate Student Awards.

Schlumberger Award Recipients

Source: Mineralogical Society

  • 2019 Sergey Krivovichev
  • 2018 Jonathan Lloyd
  • 2017 Maggie Cusack
  • 2016 Liane G. Benning
  • 2015 Simon Harley
  • 2014 Barbara Mayer
  • 2013 Michael A. Carpenter
  • 2012 Simon Redfern
  • 2011 Georges Calas
  • 2010 Randy Parrish
  • 2009 John Brodholt
  • 2008 Dave Rubie
  • 2007 Roger Powell
  • 2006 David Vaughan
  • 2005 Reinhard Boehler
  • 2004 Dave Manning
  • 2003 Hugh O'Neill
  • 2002 Christopher Hawkesworth
  • 2001 Tim Holland
  • 2000 Paul Nadeau
  • 1999 David Price
  • 1998 Ekhard Salje
  • 1997 Tony Fallick
  • 1996 Mike Henderson
  • 1995 Paul Ribbe
  • 1994 Frank Hawthorne
  • 1993 Ian Parsons
  • 1992 Ian Carmichael
  • 1991 Bernie Wood
  • 1990 Jeff Wilson

Max Hey Medal Recipients

Source: Mineralogical Society

  • 2019 Thomas Műller
  • 2018 Oliver Lord
  • 2017  Victoria Coker
  • 2016  Philip Pogge von Strandmann
  • 2015  Stuart J. Mills
  • 2014  Chris Greenwell
  • 2013  Nicholas J. Tosca and Hendrik Heinz (joint winners)
  • 2012  Madeleine Humphreys
  • 2011  Dan Morgan
  • 2010  Takeshi Kasama
  • 2009  Andrew Walker
  • 2008  Diego Gatta
  • 2007  Michele Warren
  • 2006  A. Dominic Fortes
  • 2005  Paul Hoskin
  • 2004  Mark E. Hodson and Lidunka Vocadlo (joint winners)
  • 2003  R.J. Harrison
  • 2002  Dan J. Frost
  • 2001  Andrew C. Kerr
  • 2000  Ian C.W. Fitzsimons and R.W. Kent (joint winners)
  • 1999  Alison Pawley
  • 1998  M.R. Lee
  • 1997 Jamie J. Wilkinson
  • 1996  no award
  • 1995 Simon C. Kohn
  • 1994 Simon Anthony Turner Redfern
  • 1993  Ross John Angel

See also

References

  1. "About the Mineralogical Society". Mineralogical Society of Great Britain & Ireland. Retrieved 2012-01-15.
  2. "Membership categories". Retrieved 6 November 2018.
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