Memorial to the Women of the Confederacy

The Memorial to the Women of the Confederacy, also known as the U.D.C. Memorial Building, is a historic building located in Richmond, Virginia, that serves as the national headquarters of the U.D.C. It was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 2008.[2] The building is open to the public on scheduled days. The Caroline Meriwether Goodlett Library and the Helen Walpole Brewer Records Room] are open by appointment only.[4]

Memorial to the Women of the Confederacy
United Daughters of the Confederacy
Main façade of the Memorial Building
For the women of the Confederate States[1]
EstablishedApril 17, 1955 (1955-04-17)[1]
UnveiledNovember 11, 1957 (1957-11-11)[1]
United Daughters of the Confederacy Memorial Building
Coordinatescoordinates = 37°33′25″N 77°28′27″W
AreaLess than one acre
Built1955 (1955)-1957
Architectural styleStripped Classical
NRHP reference #08000341[2]
VLR #127-0398-0054
Significant dates
Added to NRHPApril 24, 2008
Designated VLRDecember 5, 2007[3]
Location37°33′25″N 77°28′27″W
Designed byLouis Ballou
This building is erected to the glory of God and the memory of our Confederate mothers[1]

History

The Memorial to the Women of the Confederacy is located at 328 North Arthur Ashe Boulevard. The Park was created in 1934 by an act of the Assembly of Virginia which states in part that ″said tract of land has long been the site of the home for Confederate Soldiers and Sailors, and is thus intimately associated with Confederate memories... is also near the Confederate Memorial Institute and Home for Needy Confederate Women, and for those said reasons will constitute a peculiarly fitting and appropriate location for a Confederate Memorial Park...″[5] It was built between 1955 and 1957, and is a one-story, three part, marble-clad building in a stripped classical style. It features a double leaf, central entrance designed to resemble a mausoleum and with 17-foot high bronze doors composed of rectangular bronze panels. A two-story addition was made to the rear of the northwest corner of the building in 1996. It was constructed principally of Georgia marble, with entrance doors of architectural bronze decorated with the organization's badge. The walks are of red Virginia brick. There are also the Great Hall, Reception Hall, Lounge, Committee Room, Dining Room, Kitchen, storage rooms, and Basement; memorials to Confederate heroes, to the women of the Confederacy, the co-founders of the organization and a number of relics from the R. E. Lee Camp. Thus the building fulfills its dual purpose as a headquarters building and as a memorial to the women of the Confederacy.[5][6]

See also

Notes

  1. UDC History (Vol. III), 1988, pp. 135-143.
  2. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  3. "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Retrieved March 19, 2013.
  4. UDC Handbook (6th ed.), 2013, pp. 157-168.
  5. UDC Handbook (1st ed.), 1959, pp. 67-69.
  6. Vicky M. Blackard (August 2007). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: United Daughters of the Confederacy Memorial Building" (PDF). Virginia Department of Historic Resources. and Accompanying two photos

References

  • United Daughters of the Confederacy, Business Office (1959). Handbook of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (1st ed.). Richmond, VA: Author.
  • United Daughters of the Confederacy, Business Office (2013). Handbook of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (6th ed.). Richmond, VA: Author.
  • United Daughters of the Confederacy, History Committee (ed.) (1988). The History of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (Vol. III). Raleigh, NC: Edwards & Broughton.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)


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