Matsue Domain

Matsue Domain (松江藩, Matsue-han) was a Japanese domain of the Edo period. It was associated with Izumo Province in modern-day Shimane Prefecture.[1]

In the han system, Matsue was a political and economic abstraction based on periodic cadastral surveys and projected agricultural yields.[2] In other words, the domain was defined in terms of kokudaka, not land area.[3] This was different from the feudalism of the West.

History

The domain was controlled from what is now Matsue Castle in Matsue, Shimane.

List of daimyōs

The hereditary daimyō were head of the clan and head of the domain.

  1. Horio Yoshiharu[4]
  2. Horio Tadauji
  3. Horio Tadaharu[4]
  1. Kyōgoku Tadataka[5]
  1. Matsudaira Naomasa
  2. Matsudaira Tsunataka[7]
  3. Matsudaira Tsunachika
  4. Matsudaira Yoshitō
  5. Matsudaira Nobuzumi
  6. Matsudaira Munenobu
  7. Matsudaira Harusato
  8. Matsudaira Naritsune
  9. Matsudaira Naritoki
  10. Matsudaira Sadayasu

Genealogy

  • Tokugawa Ieyasu, 1st Tokugawa Shōgun (1543–1616; r. 1603–1605)
    • Yūki Hideyasu, 1st Lord of Fukui (1574–1607)
      • I. Matsudaira Naomasa, 1st Lord of Matsue (cr. 1638) (1601–1666; r. 1638–1666)
        • II. Tsunataka, 2nd Lord of Matsue (1631–1675; r. 1666–1675)
          • III. Tsunachika, 3rd Lord of Matsue (1659-1709; r. 1675-1704)
          • IV. Yoshitō, 4th Lord of Matsue (1668–1705; r. 1704–1705)
            • V. Nobuzumi, 5th Lord of Matsue (1698–1731; r. 1705–1731)
              • VI. Munenobu, 6th Lord of Matsue (1729–1782; r. 1731–1767)
                • VII. Harusatō, 7th Lord of Matsue (1751–1818; r. 1767–1806)
                  • VIII. Naritsune, 8th Lord of Matsue (1791–1822; r. 1806–1822)
                    • IX. Naritoki, 9th Lord of Matsue (1815–1863; r. 1822–1853)
        • Chikayoshi, 1st Lord of Hirose (1632–1717)
          • Chikatoki 2nd Lord of Hirose (1659–1702)
            • Chikatomo, 3rd Lord of Hirose (1681–1728)
              • Nagataka, 4th Lord of Tsuyama (1725–1762)
                • Yasuchika, 5th Lord of Tsuyama (1752–1794)
                  • Naritaka, 7th Lord of Tsuyama (1788–1838)
                    • X. Sadayasu, 10th Lord of Matsue (1855–1882; Lord: 1853-1869; Governor: 1869–1871)
                      • Naoaki, 11th family head, 1st Count (1865–1940; 11th family head: 1882–1940; Count: cr. 1884)
                        • Tadakuni, 12th family head, 2nd Count (1902–1988; 12th family head: 1940–1988; 2nd Count: 1940–1947)
                          • Tadakoto, 13th family head (b. 1925; 13th family head: 1988–)
                            • Naotada (b. 1966)

[8]

See also

References

  1. "Izumo Province" at JapaneseCastleExplorer.com; retrieved 2013-4-27.
  2. Mass, Jeffrey P. and William B. Hauser. (1987). The Bakufu in Japanese History, p. 150.
  3. Elison, George and Bardwell L. Smith (1987). Warlords, Artists, & Commoners: Japan in the Sixteenth Century, p. 18.
  4. Papinot, Jacques Edmond Joseph. (1906). Dictionnaire d’histoire et de géographie du Japon; Papinot, (2003). "Horio" at Nobiliare du Japon, p. 11; retrieved 2013-4-27.
  5. Papinot, (2003). "Kyōgoku" at Nobiliare du Japon, p. 27; retrieved 2013-4-27.
  6. Papinot, (2003). "Matsudaira" at Nobiliare du Japon, p. 30; retrieved 2013-4-27.
  7. Borton, Hugh. "Peasant uprisings in Japan of the Tokugawa period," Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan (1938), p. 46 n31.
  8. Genealogy (jp)


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