Maryland Terrapins women's basketball

The Maryland Terrapins women's basketball team represents the University of Maryland in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I competition. Maryland, a founding member of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC), left the ACC in 2014 to join the Big Ten Conference. The program won the 2006 NCAA Women's Division I Basketball Tournament championship and has appeared in the NCAA Final Four five times (1982, 1989, 2006, 2014, 2015); Maryland also appeared once in the AIAW Final Four (1978). As members of the ACC, the Terrapins won regular season conference championships (1979, 1982, 1988, 1989, 2009) and an ACC-record ten conference tournament championships (1978, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1986, 1988, 1989, 2009, 2012). The program won the Big Ten Conference regular season and tournament championships in 2015, 2016, and 2017.

Maryland Terrapins
2019–20 Maryland Terrapins women's basketball team
UniversityUniversity of Maryland
Head coachBrenda Frese (18th season)
ConferenceBig Ten
LocationCollege Park, Maryland
ArenaXfinity Center
(Capacity: 17,950)
NicknameTerrapin
ColorsRed, White, Black, and Gold[1]
                   
NCAA Tournament Champions
2006
NCAA Tournament Final Four
1982, 1989, 2006, 2014, 2015
NCAA Tournament Elite Eight
1982, 1988, 1989, 1992, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2014, 2015
NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen
1982, 1983, 1988, 1989, 1992, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2017
NCAA Tournament Second round
1983, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
NCAA Tournament Appearances
1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1997, 2001, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019
AIAW Tournament Runner-up
1978
AIAW Tournament Final Four
1978
AIAW Tournament Elite Eight
1978, 1979, 1980, 1981
AIAW Tournament Sweet Sixteen
1978, 1979, 1980, 1981
AIAW Tournament Appearances
1978, 1979, 1980, 1981
Conference Tournament Champions
1978, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1986, 1988, 1989, 2009, 2012, 2015, 2016, 2017
Conference Regular Season Champions
1979, 1982, 1988, 1989, 2009, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2019

Since 2002, the team has been led by head coach Brenda Frese. Over her 18 season tenure, she has led the Terrapins to 15 NCAA tournament appearances, 8 NCAA Sweet Sixteens, 6 NCAA Elite Eight, 3 NCAA Final Fours, and the 2006 NCAA National Championship.

History

Women's basketball was first organized to play on campus in 1923.[2] The early teams participated solely in intracollegiate competition, with classes or sororities competing against each other for a trophy.[3] The team was officially recognized as a varsity sport in 1971, and was led by coach Dottie McKnight during its first four seasons.[4] The Terps were successful from the start, winning their first state championship in the 1972–73 season.[5] They went on to win ten ACC championships and one NCAA title.[5]

On January 26, 1975, the Lady Terrapins played host to Immaculata in the first nationally televised women's college basketball game. The game took place in Cole Field House. Some sources report that Immaculata won 80–48,[6][7] while others report 85–63.[8][9] On March 9, 2019, Maryland won its 1000th game, becoming the 14th (unsure, based on 2017 data) team to win 1000 games. It did so at home against Michigan in the Big Ten Semifinals, which it won by a score of 73-72.

The team has been led by three head coaches: Dottie McKnight (1971–1975), Chris Weller (1975–2002), and Brenda Frese (2002–present).[4] Although McKnight only coached four seasons of Terps basketball, she quickly led her new team to success. She left with a record of 44–17 (.721).[4] Weller, a University of Maryland alumna ('66) and former Terps player, took over the head coaching position in 1975. She led the Terps to numerous national championship appearances and a total of eight ACC championship titles.[4] When she retired, Weller left with a 499–286 record (.636).[4] At the end of the 2018–19 season, current coach Brenda Frese has a record of 458–124 (.787).[4] She has also led her team to a national championship title, eight national championship appearances, and two conference championship titles. Frese is known for her recruiting skills, with Shay Doron being credited as her first major recruit.

Notable players

Many Lady Terrapins have gone on to national prominence, appearing in the Olympics and playing in professional leagues.[10][11][12][13]

2007–08 season

Record
OverallACC
30–313–1
Poll positions
APCoaches
44
As of March 12, 2009

Head coach Brenda Frese announced during the pre-season that she was pregnant. Because of this, she was unable to coach from the sidelines for most of the regular season. Newcomer assistant coach Daron Park would take on the role of acting head coach. With the coaching changes, the experienced Lady Terrapins improved to a 30–3 record, and ranked 5 and 6 in the AP and Coaches polls respectively. Key returning players include Marissa Coleman, Laura Harper, Crystal Langhorne, and Kristi Toliver, all of whom were on the 2006 NCAA Championship team. With the loss of Shay Doron, whose #22 jersey was honored this season, Frese brought in 5 recruits. Two weeks after giving birth to twin boys, Frese returned to the sidelines during the ACC women's basketball tournament. Maryland eventually lost to Duke in the semifinals.

2019–20 Roster

2019–20 Maryland Terrapins women's basketball team
PlayersCoaches
Pos.#NameHeightYearPrevious schoolHometown
C 00 Olivia Owens 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) SoNiskayuna Niskayuna, NY
F 1 Shakira Austin 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m) SoRiverdale Baptist Fredericksburg, VA
G 2 Zoe Young 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m) FrWest Des Moines Valley Des Moines, IA
G 3 Channise Lewis 5 ft 8 in (1.73 m) JrMiami Country Day Miami, FL
G 5 Kaila Charles 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) SrRiverdale Baptist Glenn Dale, MD
G 11 Taylor Mikesell 5 ft 11 in (1.8 m) SoJackson Massillon, OH
F 12 Mimi Collins 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) SoPaul VI Catholic HS
Tennessee
Waldorf, MD
F 13 Faith Masonius 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) FrManasquan Spring Lake, NJ
G 14 Diamond Miller 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) FrFranklin Somerset, NJ
G 15 Ashley Owusu 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m) FrPaul VI Catholic HS Woodbridge, VA
G 22 Blair Watson 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m) SrNutley Nutley, NJ
F 24 Stephanie Jones 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) SrAberdeen Havre de Grace, MD
G 32 Sara Vujacic 5 ft 11 in (1.8 m) SrWalters State CC Maribor, Slovenia
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)

Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • (S) Suspended
  • (I) Ineligible
  • (W) Walk-on

Roster
Last update: October 30, 2019

Coaching staff

Position Name
Head Coach:Brenda Frese
Associate Head Coach:Shay Robinson
Assistant Coach:Bett Shelby
Assistant Coach:Terry Nooner
Director of Basketball Operations:Libby Ellis
Director of Recruiting Operations:Joe Glowacki

Year by year results

Conference tournament winners noted with # Source [14]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason Coaches' poll AP poll
Dottie McKnight (Independent) (1971–1975)
1971–72 Dottie McKnight 12–2 AIAW Regional Tournament
1972–73 Dottie McKnight 11–3 AIAW Regional Tournament
1973–74 Dottie McKnight 10–6 AIAW Regional Tournament
1974–75 Dottie McKnight 11–6 AIAW Regional Tournament
Dottie McKnight: 44–17 
Chris Weller (Independent, ACC) (1975–2002)
1975–76 Chris Weller 20–4 EAIAW Regional Tournament
1976–77 Chris Weller 17–6 EAIAW Regional Tournament16
Atlantic Coast Conference
1977–78 Chris Weller 27–45–12nd#AIAW Finals6
1978–79 Chris Weller 22–76–11st#AIAW Quarterfinals8
1979–80 Chris Weller 21–95–2T-2ndAIAW Quarterfinals6
1980–81 Chris Weller 19–95–23rd#AIAW Quarterfinals8
1981–82 Chris Weller 25–76–11st#NCAA Final Four3
1982–83 Chris Weller 26–510–3T-2nd#NCAA First Round7
1983–84 Chris Weller 19–1010–42ndNCAA First Round17
1984–85 Chris Weller 9–184–10T-6th
1985–86 Chris Weller 17–136–85th#NCAA Second Round (Bye)
1986–87 Chris Weller 15–146–85th
1987–88 Chris Weller 26–612–2T-1st#NCAA Elite Eight89
1988–89 Chris Weller 29–313–11st#NCAA Final Four35
1989–90 Chris Weller 19–117–74thNCAA Second Round (Bye)
1990–91 Chris Weller 17–139–5T-2ndNCAA First Round
1991–92 Chris Weller 25–613–32ndNCAA Elite Eight88
1992–93 Chris Weller 22–811–5T-2ndNCAA Second Round1811
1993–94 Chris Weller 15–138–84th
1994–95 Chris Weller 11–182–149th
1995–96 Chris Weller 13–147–96th
1996–97 Chris Weller 18–109–7T-3rdNCAA First Round
1997–98 Chris Weller 15–137–96th
1998–99 Chris Weller 6–213–13T-7th
1999–2000 Chris Weller 16–155–117thWNIT Quarterfinals
2000–01 Chris Weller 17–128–8T-5thNCAA First Round
2001–02 Chris Weller 13–174–12T-8th
Chris Weller: 499–286
Brenda Frese (ACC, Big Ten) (2002–present)
2002–03 Brenda Frese 10–184–128th
2003–04 Brenda Frese 18–138–8T-3rdNCAA Second Round
2004–05 Brenda Frese 22–107–76thNCAA Second Round24
2005–06 Brenda Frese 34–412–2T-2ndNCAA Champions13
2006–07 Brenda Frese 28–610–4T-3rdNCAA Second Round146
2007–08 Brenda Frese 33–413–12ndNCAA Elite Eight75
2008–09 Brenda Frese 31–512–2T-1st#NCAA Elite Eight53
2009–10 Brenda Frese 21–135–99thWNIT Sweet Sixteen
2010–11 Brenda Frese 24–89–5T-4thNCAA Second Round2316
2011–12 Brenda Frese 31–512–4T-3rd#NCAA Elite Eight55
2012–13 Brenda Frese 26–814–4T-2ndNCAA Sweet Sixteen1012
2013–14 Brenda Frese 28–712–4T-2ndNCAA Final Four119
Big Ten Conference
2014–15 Brenda Frese 34–318–01st#NCAA Final Four44
2015–16 Brenda Frese 31–416–21st#NCAA Second Round55
2016–17 Brenda Frese 32–315–1T-1st#NCAA Sweet Sixteen43
2017–18 Brenda Frese 26–812–42ndNCAA Second round1618
2018–19 Brenda Frese 29–515–31stNCAA Second round99
Brenda Frese: 458–124
Total:1001–427

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

NCAA Tournament results

Year Seed Round Opponent Result
1982 #2First Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#7 Stanford
#3 Missouri
#4 Drake
#2 Cheyney
W 82–48
W 80–68
W 89–78
L 66−76
1983 #3First Round
Sweet Sixteen
#6 Central Michigan
#2 Old Dominion
W 94–71
L 57−74
1984 #6First Round#3 CheyneyL 64−92
1986 #6Second Round#3 Ohio StateL 71−87
1988 #2Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#7 St. Joseph's
#3 Ohio State
#1 Auburn
W 78–67
W 81–66
L 74−103
1989 #1Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#9 Bowling Green
#4 Stephen F. Austin
#2 Texas
#1 Tennessee
W 78–65
W 89–54
W 79–71
L 65−77
1990 #6First Round
Second Round
#11 Appalachian State
#3 Providence
W 100–71
L 75−77
1991 #6First Round#11 Holy CrossL 74−81
1992 #2Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#10 Toledo
#3 Purdue
#1 Western Kentucky
W 73–60
W 64–58
L 70−75
1993 #2Second Round#7 SW Missouri StateL 82−86
1997 #9First Round#8 PurdueL 48−74
2001 #8First Round#9 Colorado StateL 69−83
2004 #12First Round
Second Round
#5 Miami (FL)
#4 LSU
W 86–85
L 61−76
2005 #7First Round
Second Round
#10 UW–Green Bay
#2 Ohio State
W 65–55
L 65−75
2006 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
Title Game
#15 Sacred Heart
#7 St. John's
#3 Baylor
#5 Utah
#1 North Carolina
#1 Duke
W 95–54
W 81–74
W 82–63
W 85−75 (OT)
W 81–70
W 78–75 (OT)
2007 #2First Round
Second Round
#15 Harvard
#7 Ole Miss
W 89–65
L 78−89
2008 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#16 Coppin State
#8 Nebraska
#4 Vanderbilt
#2 Stanford
W 80–66
W 76–64
W 80–66
L 87−98
2009 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#16 Dartmouth
#9 Utah
#4 Vanderbilt
#3 Louisville
W 82–53
W 71–56
W 78–74
L 60−77
2011 #4First Round
Second Round
#13 St. Francis (PA)
#5 Georgetown
W 70–48
L 57−79
2012 #2First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
#15 Navy
#7 Louisville
#3 Texas A&M
#1 Notre Dame
W 59–44
W 72–68
W 81–74
L 49−80
2013 #4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#13 Quinnipiac
#5 Michigan State
#1 Connecticut
W 72–52
W 74−49
L 50–76
2014 #4First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#13 Army
#5 Texas
#1 Tennessee
#3 Louisville
#1 Notre Dame
W 90–52
W 69−64
W 73–62
W 76–73
L 61–87
2015 #1First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
Elite Eight
Final Four
#16 New Mexico State
#8 Princeton
#4 Duke
#2 Tennessee
#1 Connecticut
W 75–57
W 85−70
W 65–55
W 58–48
L 58–81
2016 #2First Round
Second Round
#15 Iona
#7 Washington
W 74–58
L 65−74
2017 #3First Round
Second Round
Sweet Sixteen
#14 Bucknell
#6 West Virginia
#10 Oregon
W 103–61
W 83−56
L 63–77
2018 #5First Round
Second Round
#12 Princeton
#4 NC State
W 77–57
L 60−74
2019 #3First Round
Second Round
#14 Radford
#6 UCLA
W 73–51
L 80−85

See also

References

  1. University of Maryland Visual Identity Guide (PDF). Retrieved July 13, 2018.
  2. "Basketball, women's". MAC to Millennium. Retrieved March 4, 2013.
  3. "Reveille". Internet Archive. Retrieved 1 October 2014.
  4. "Coaching History". umterps.com. Retrieved March 4, 2013.
  5. "Great Teams and Moments". umterps.com. Retrieved March 4, 2013.
  6. Gonzales, Patrick (January 29, 2005). "Lights, Camera, Action". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. Retrieved December 4, 2012.
  7. Ginsburg, David. "First women's college basketball game on national TV was hard sell". ACC. Retrieved December 4, 2012.
  8. "PSU's JoePa era stretches generations". NCAA.com. Retrieved December 4, 2012.
  9. "The History of Women's Basketball". WNBA.com. Retrieved December 4, 2012.
  10. "All-Time Terps in the WNBA". umterps.com. Retrieved March 5, 2013.
  11. "Olympians". MAC to Millennium. Retrieved March 4, 2013.
  12. "Alumni of note". MAC to Millennium. Retrieved March 4, 2013.
  13. "All-Time Terps in the ABL". umterps.com. Retrieved March 5, 2013.
  14. "Year-By-Year Records". University of Maryland. Retrieved 6 Aug 2013.
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