Martha Ratliff

Martha Ratliff is an American linguist and Professor Emerita at Wayne State University.[1] She is a leading specialist in Hmong–Mien languages and also notable for her recent reconstruction of the Proto-Hmong–Mien language.[2]

Ratliff earned a B.A. in English from Carleton College in 1968, an M.A.T. in English Education from University of Chicago in 1970, and a Ph.D. in Linguistics from University of Chicago in 1986, with a dissertation entitled The Morphological Functions of Tone in White Hmong.[3][4]

She currently serves as an associate editor for the historical linguistics journal Diachronica.[5] She is co-founder of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society along with Eric Schiller.[6]

Publications

  • Ratliff, Martha (1992). Meaningful Tone: A Study of Tonal Morphology in Compounds, Form Classes, and Expressive Phrases in White Hmong. Dekalb, Illinois: Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Northern Illinois University. ISBN 1-877979-77-5.
  • Ratliff, Martha (2004). Tapp, Michaud, Culas, and Lee (eds.). Vocabulary of Environment and Subsistence in the Hmong–Mien Protolanguage. Symposium on the Hmong/Miao in Asia. Chiang Mai, Thailand: Silkworm Books. pp. 147–165.CS1 maint: uses editors parameter (link) Manuscript.
  • Ratliff, Martha (2010). Hmong–Mien-language history. Canberra, Australia: Pacific Linguistics. ISBN 0-85883-615-7.
  • Newman, Paul and Martha Ratliff. 2001. Linguistic Fieldwork. Cambridge University Press.

References

  1. "Martha Ratliff - College of Liberal Arts & Sciences - Wayne State University". clasprofiles.wayne.edu. Retrieved 2018-12-08.
  2. "Martha Ratliff publications and citations". scholar.google.se. Retrieved 2018-12-08.
  3. Communications, Wayne State University Web. "Martha Ratliff - College of Liberal Arts & Sciences - Wayne State University". clasprofiles.wayne.edu. Retrieved 2018-09-14.
  4. "Graduate Alumni (1951-present) | Department of Linguistics". linguistics.uchicago.edu. Retrieved 2018-12-08.
  5. "Diachronica". diachronica.org. Retrieved 2018-09-14.
  6. "Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society". www.jseals.org. Retrieved 2018-09-15.


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