Lottie Williams

Lottie Williams (January 20, 1874 – November 16, 1962) was an American character actress whose career spanned both the silent and sound film eras.

Lottie Williams
Williams in the 1937 film, The Great O'Malley
Born(1874-01-20)January 20, 1874
Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
DiedNovember 16, 1962(1962-11-16) (aged 88)
Los Angeles, California, United States
OccupationActress
Years active1920–1949

Biography

Born on January 20, 1874 in Indianapolis, Indiana, Williams began her career on the stage and appeared in Broadway productions during the 1900s. Williams would make her film debut in a supporting role in the 1920 silent comedy, A Full House. During her 30-year career, she would appear in over 70 films, mostly in smaller and supporting roles.[1] Some of the more notable films in which she appeared include: Michael Curtiz' Angels with Dirty Faces (1938), starring James Cagney and Pat O'Brien;[2] the 1939 melodrama Dark Victory, with Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart and George Brent;[3] Meet John Doe (1941), directed by Frank Capra, and starring Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyck;[4] the screwball comedy, The Man Who Came to Dinner (1942), starring Bette Davis, Ann Sheridan, and Monty Woolley;[5] and Edge of Darkness (1942), starring Errol Flynn and Ann Sheridan;[6] Her final appearance would be in a supporting role in 1949's One Last Fling, starring Alexis Smith and Zachary Scott, after which she retired from the film industry.

Williams died on November 16, 1962, in Los Angeles, California, and was cremated and interred at Chapel of the Pines Crematory.[7]

Filmography

(Per AFI database)[1]

References

  1. "Lottie Williams". American Film Institute. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  2. "Angels with Dirty Faces". American Film Institute. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  3. "Dark Victory". American Film Institute. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  4. "Meet John Doe". American Film Institute. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  5. "The Man Who Came to Dinner". American Film Institute. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  6. "Edge of Darkness". American Film Institute. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  7. "Lottie Williams". Find a Grave. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
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