Logan Medal of the Arts

The Logan Medal of the Arts was an arts prize initiated in 1907 and associated with the Art Institute of Chicago, the Frank G Logan family and the Society for Sanity in Art. From 1917 through 1940, 270 awards were given for contributions to American art.

See also the Logan Medal of the Geological Association of Canada.

The Medal was named for arts patron Frank Granger Logan (1851–1937), founder of the brokerage house of Logan & Bryan, who served over 50 years on the board of the Chicago Art Institute. He and his wife, Josephine Hancock Logan, administered the award consistent with their patronage of the Society for Sanity in Art, which they founded in 1936, and the theme of her 1937 book Sanity in Art. The Logans strongly opposed all forms of modern art, including cubism, surrealism, and abstract expressionism. It was not unknown for the Society of Sanity in Art to award a prize (e.g. in 1938 to Rudolph F. Ingerle) in competition with the official award by the exhibition prize committee of a prize the Logans had already sponsored.

The Logans sponsored several prizes in their name. The Mr and Mrs Frank G Logan prize was awarded to a jury-selected exhibit at the American Paintings and Sculpture Exhibitions held in Chicago, and a similarly named prize was awarded to a local artist at the annual Chicago and Vicinity Exhibition for a selected exhibit. Frank G Logan prizes were also awarded at exhibitions of prints by the Chicago Society of Etchers, the annual International Watercolor Exhibition and the annual International Lithography and Wood Engraving Exhibition, all held at the Chicago Art Institute. Logan prizes were also awarded by the Society for Sanity in Art at exhibitions in California. Recipients of these prizes are listed below.

Recipients

Logan Medal of the Arts

This is an incomplete list, please help us by updating it.

Mr and Mrs Frank G. Logan prize ($1000-$1500)

Formerly awarded at the annual American Paintings and Sculpture Exhibition, Chicago
Source: Art Institute of Chicago

Mr and Mrs Frank G. Logan Medal ($2500)

Formerly awarded at the annual American Paintings and Sculpture Exhibition, Chicago
Source: Art Institute of Chicago

Mr and Mrs Frank G. Logan Art Institute Medal ($500-$2000)

Awarded at the annual American Paintings and Sculpture Exhibition, Chicago
Source: Art Institute of Chicago

Mr and Mrs Frank G. Logan Art Institute Prize ($500-$2000)

Awarded at the Chicago and Vicinity annual exhibition
Source: Art Institute of Chicago

  • 1917: Walter Ufer for In the land of mañana ($500); Victor Higgins for Juanita and the suspicious cat ($200)[28] (first award)
  • 1918: Victor Higgins for Fiesta day ($500); Emil Zettler for Woman and child (sculpture) ($200)[28]
  • 1919: Frank A. Werner for Louis H. Sullivan ($500) ; Karl A. Buehr for Farson's Creek($200)[28]
  • 1920: Paul Bartlett for Drizzly day ($500); Carl R. Krafft for Banks of the Gasconade($200)
  • 1921: Frank V. Dudley for Duneland[29] ($500); Anna Lee Stacey for Thé dansant ($200)
  • 1922: Albin Polasek for Man chiseling his own destiny ($500); Samuel Glasstorner for Repentance (sculpture) ($200)
  • 1923: Frederick V. Poole for Flora ($500); William P. Henderson for Querena ($200)
  • 1924: Leopold Seyffert for A portrait ($500); John F. Stacey for From an Essex Hillside, Conn ($200)
  • 1925: Carl R. Krafft for Nocturne ($500);Archibald John Motley, Jnr for A Mulatress ($200)
  • 1926: George Oberteuffer for Portrait of my wife ($500); Frederic M. Grant for Departure of Marco Polo ($200)
  • 1927: H. Amiard Oberteuffer for The yellow dress ($750); Marques E. Reitzel for The morning route ($500)
  • 1928: Paul Trebilcock for Portrait of a painter ($750); J. Theodore Johnson for Mary ($500)
  • 1929: W. Vladimir Rouseff for In the open ($750);Edmund Giesbert for Uphill ($500)
  • 1930: Davenport Griffen for Sleep ($750);Marshall D. Smith for West Van Buren Street ($500)
  • 1931: J. Theodore Johnson for Bistro Bruel ($750); Edouard Chassaing for Black Panther (sculpture) ($500)
  • 1932: Claude Buck for Girl reading ($750);Frances Foy for Betty ($500)
  • 1933: Francis Chapin for Pink House; Laura van Pappelendam for Long Haired Cactus
  • 1934: Peterpaul Ott for The Dancer, Harald Kreutzberg (sculpture) ($750)
  • 1935: Edouard Chassaing for Head of E.L. Heitkamp (sculpture)
  • 1936: Constantine Pougialis for Russian dancer
  • 1937: Carl Hallsthammar for Venus in Red Cherry ($500)
  • 1938: Norman MacLeish for Watertown
  • 1939: Maeble Perry Edwards for Portrait of L.L. Valentine (sculpture)
  • 1940: Lawrence Adams for West Side in Winter
  • 1941: Joseph P. Gualtieri for Mario ($500)
  • 1942: Abbott Lawrence Pattison for Kneeling Women ($500)
  • 1943: Sidney Loeb for Abraham Lincoln (sculpture} ($500)
  • 1944: Edgar Miller for City Detail ($500); Margo Hoff for In the Cathedral ($300)
  • 1945: Aaron Bohrod for Joan of Arc in Montebourg
  • 1946: John Wallace Purcell for Michele Verbrugghen (sculpture) ($500)
  • 1947: Mitchell Siporin for End of an Era ($500)
  • 1948: Gustav Dalstrom for Portrait ($500)
  • 1949: Egon Wiener for Torso in wood (sculpture) ($500)
  • 1950: Suzanne Martyl for View of Galena ($500)
  • 1951: Joyce Treiman for Escape ($500)
  • 1952: Don Yacoe for Nationalism ($500)
  • 1953: Margo Hoff for Stage Fright ($1000)
  • 1954: No exhibition
  • 1955: Joseph Goto for Struggle ($1500) (sculpture); Gerald W McLaughlin for The Orator and the Ladies ($1000)
  • 1956: Anna P. Baker for High Frequency ping ($1500); Richard Hunt for Construction D (£1000) (sculpture)
  • 1957: Eleanor Coen for Growing City ($1500);Robert James Anderson for Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow ($1000)
  • 1958: Keith Boyle for White Frozen Forms ($1500); Carl E. Schwartz for The Card Players
  • 1959: Richard Talaber for Ferous Confine ($1500); Harry Brorby ($1000)
  • 1960: Eleanor Coen for Visitation ($2000); Constance Cohen for Procession ($1500)
  • 1961: William Baziotes for The Sea (£2000); Edouardo Paolozzi for Large Frog (sculpture) ($1000)
  • 1962: George Kokines for Embracement #1 ($2000);James Rosati for sculpture
  • 1963:
  • 1964: Michael Hurson for an untitled painting ($2000); Belle Sanford for The Apprentice (bronze)($1000)[30]
  • 1965: Tom Parish
  • 1966: Irene Siegel for The Family ($1000);Douglas D. Craft for Alone of a Love not Wanting ($500); Joseph J. Rozman for Caudro Tablero ($250)
  • 1967: Gladys Nilsson for Very Worldly ($2000); Leanne Shreves Stevenson for Events ($1500) (not exhibited due to controversy)
  • 1968: Mel Theobald; Lynne Cohen for Reconstruction 1 ($500)
  • 1969: Thomas Shannon for Mexo-O (sculpture)
  • 1970: No exhibition
  • 1971: Robert Lostutter for his watercolour ($500)
  • 1972: No exhibition
  • 1973: Stephen Carlson for Untitled ($1000); Bill Moll for Zoo Scene ($1000) ; Roy Schnackenberg for The Twelve Złoty Balthus ($1000); Jayme Curley for Potato Fields ($500)
  • 1974: No exhibition
  • 1975: Alice Shaddle for Gardener ($1000); Mary Stoppert for Solo ($1000) ;Terrence Karpowicz for Suspended Glass from Black Box over White Sand ($1000)[31]
  • 1976: No exhibition
  • 1977: Roger Brown for The Entry of Christ into Chicago, 1976 ($1000) ; Vera Berdich for Recurring Themes ($1000); Robert M. Donley for Helen and her Suitors ($1000)
  • 1978: No prize awarded
  • 1979: No exhibition
  • 1980: Michael J. Buglewicz for Myth ($1000) ; Steve Mose for Untitled; Filemon Santiago for La Casa de los Espantos ($1000)
  • 1981: No exhibition
  • 1982:
  • 1983: No exhibition
  • 1984: Paul Lamantia for Day thru Evening dream ($1000); Mark Jackson for Out of the Darkness ($1000) ; Hollis Sigler for The World is Endlesss Desire ($1000)

Frank G Logan Prize

Awarded at the Chicago Society of Etchers exhibition

Frank G Logan Prize

Awarded by the Society for Sanity in Art, California.

References

  1. Bulletin of the Art Institute of Chicago, Volumes 1-12, pg. 263, available online via Google Books
  2. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-12-03. Retrieved 2014-08-12.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. "FRANK WESTON BENSON (1862-1951)PAPERS, 1864-1976" (PDF). Peabody Essex Museum. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  4. Charles S. Hopkinson Virtual Gallery
  5. William Zorach: American Artists Group Monograph Number Fifteen.
  6. Castagno, John. Jewish Artists: Signatures and Monograms. p. 467.
  7. http://www.artic.edu/sites/default/files/libraries/pubs/1932/AIC1932IntWtrclr12thAn_comb.pdf
  8. "Art: East, West, South". Time. 28 March 1938.
  9. "Rudolph Ingerle (1879–1950)". M Christine Schwartz Collection. Retrieved 25 March 1940. Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  10. "Art: Academic Art". Time. Retrieved 25 March 1940. Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  11. "38th Annual Exhibition" (PDF). Art Institute of Chicago. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  12. "Art: In Chicago". Time. November 10, 1924.
  13. "Art: In Chicago". Time. November 9, 1925.
  14. "Heinz Warneke". Langs de Wal. Retrieved 2 February 2015.
  15. "Art: Chicago's Prizes". Time. November 9, 1931.
  16. "Art: Sinking Hearts". Time. November 18, 1935.
  17. "Art: Proletarian Gloom". Time. November 4, 1935.
  18. Hayes, Patrick J. The Making of Modern Immigration: An Encyclopedia of People and Ideas. p. 294.
  19. "Seated Figure". Wikiart. Retrieved 2 February 2015.
  20. "61st Annual Exhibition" (PDF). Art Institute of Chicago. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  21. "Biographical Chronology". Retrieved 4 February 2015.
  22. "MARK DI SUVERO" (PDF). Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  23. "Stuart Davis". artnet. Retrieved 4 February 2015.
  24. Castagno, John. Jewish Artists: Signatures and Monograms. p. 201.
  25. "George Segal, American, 1924-2000". Chicago Art Institute. Retrieved 4 February 2015.
  26. "Modern and Contemporary Art". Art Institute of Chicago. Retrieved 4 February 2015.
  27. "AWARDS, ELECTIONS, AND HONORS". Rauschenberg Foundation. Retrieved 7 February 2015.
  28. "25th Annual Exhibition" (PDF). Art Institute of Chicago. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  29. Frank V. Dudley biography Archived 2007-01-08 at the Wayback Machine
  30. "Chicago Tribune". 30 April 1964. p. 43.
  31. "75th Exhibition" (PDF). Art Institute of Chicago. Retrieved 4 February 2015.
  32. "Selected Chronology for Edward Hopper (1882–1967)". Art Institute of Chicago. Retrieved 22 February 2015.
  33. "Anna Wilson, "Mrs. Webster" (1936) SOLD P924". Early Californian Antiques. Retrieved 5 February 2015.
  34. "FRANK TOLLES CHAMBERLIN (1873-1961)". Sullivan Goss. Retrieved 5 February 2015.
  35. "Edward Bruce Douglas". State Historical Society of Iowa. Retrieved 5 February 2015.
  36. "Frank M. Moore (1877-1967)". George Stern Fine Arts. Retrieved 5 February 2015.

Sources

  • Rudolph Ingerle (1879-1950): Paintings of the Ozarks, the Great Smoky Mountains and the 1933 Century of progress Exposition (Chicago: Aaron Galleries, 2000)
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.