Lloyd Raffetto

Lloyd Raffetto also known as Lloyd A. Raffetto, Lloyd Alexander Raffetto, and "Raff" (1897-1988), was a noted[1] Italian-American-Irish-American co-inventor of an ice cream manufacturing process, entrepreneur, and banker who owned the Raffles Hotel (now Carey House) and co-founded the Mother Lode Bank, both of Placerville, California.[2][3][4]

Lloyd Raffetto
Born
Lloyd Alexander Raffetto

December 27, 1897
DiedApril 5, 1988(1988-04-05) (aged 90)
NationalityAmerican
Other namesLloyd A. Raffetto, L.A. Raffetto, Raff
Alma materUniversity of California at Berkeley
OccupationIce cream process inventor, hotel owner, bank co-founder
Years active1920s-1970s
EmployerRaffles Hotel (owner)
Known forco-founding Mother Lode Bank
Spouse(s)Ethel Quigley
Children1 son
Parent(s)John Augustus Raffetto, Adela Isadeen Creighton
RelativesMichael Raffetto (brother), John Augustus Raffetto Jr. (brother), Alexander Howison Murray Jr. (brother-in-law)

Background

Lloyd Alexander Raffetto was born on December 27, 1897, in Placerville, California. His parents were John Augustus Raffetto Sr. and Adela Creighton Raffetto. He was the eldest of four surviving children, followed by Michael Raffetto, John Augustus Raffetto Jr., and Isadeen Adela Raffetto (future wife of Alexander Howison Murray Jr.. He attended El Dorado High School and the University of California, Berkeley, where he was a member of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity and manager of the agricultural journal.[5][6][7][8]

Career

Raffles Hotel

In 1908, Raffetto's father bought the Cary House.[9] In 1915, he demolished and rebuilt it with three stories that had fifty-four rooms (fifteen with baths), coffee shop, and dining room. Raffetto renamed it the Raffles Hotel. It is now again the Cary House.[2][10][11][12][13][14]

Historical figures known to have stayed at the hotel include Mark Twain (who used to write for the Mountain Democrat in Placerville), President Ulysses S. Grant and John Studebaker. Hollywood figures, such as actress Bette Davis, have graced the hotel. Most recently, Brooke Shields and Lou Diamond Phillips filmed a movie at the hotel.[15]

In 1928, Raffetto co-authored a book on the manufacture ice cream that substituted powdered milk for real milk.[16]

In 1935, Raffetto became president of the El Dorado County Chamber of Commerce, based in Placerville.[17]

Mother Lode Bank

Oakland Mayor, Visiting Newspapermen, Other Dignitaries to Sample "Hangtown Fry" Breakfast

"Hangtown Fry," a delectable breakfast dish which had its origins at the Cary House in the early mining days and has since appeared on tables of the nation's leading hotels and restaurants, will be served to members of the visiting press delegation, Oakland's Mayor Clifford Rishell and other dignitaries attending the Wagon Caravan Breakfast at the fair grounds Sunday morning.
Mayor A. H. "Sandy" Murray, who issued invitations to the mayors of Oakland and San Francisco to attend the Caravan festivities this week end, has been assured that Mayor Rishell will be present. Mayor Robinson of San Francisco had an important prior official obligation.
Lloyd Raffetto, owner of the Raffles Hotel, says the story of the origin of Hangtown Fry, though well known here, is worthy of repetition.
A well-heeled miner who has been panning a rich sand bar for several weeks and eating his own sorry cooking came into the Cary House and demanded:
"What is the most expensive meal you serve to a hungry man for breakfast?"
He was told that fresh eggs, then selling for about a dollar apiece and hard to get, was considered the No. 1 breakfast, or that a breakfast of fried oysters might be considered a first line delicacy.
"Well, give me three of four eggs and put in some oysters," the miner said, "And throw in a couple slabs of bacon, too."
The resulting dish was so pleasing that others (presumably those whose pokes were full of dust and nuggets) followed suit, and the recipe became famous.
For guidance of those whose appetites are whetted by reference to the good old days, here is Raff's recipe:

  • Saute two or three slices of bacon. Add a few oysters and saute them.
  • Add beaten eggs, about three per serving, so that the eggs surround the oysters and cover the bacon. Season to taste.
  • Serve by turning the pan's contents out upside down on a serving platter.
The browned bacon will then be on top.[2]

In February 1952, Raffetto was one of several applicants for FDIC membership.[18] In 1953, Raffetto became one of the organizers and long time directors of the Mother Lode Bank (1953-1975), headquartered at 447 Main Street, Placerville.[3][19] California state sentor Swift Berry served as its first president from 1953 to 1962.[20] In 1963, Raffetto was elected president.[19][21] In 1957, the bank applied to open a branch in Grass Valley, California.[22] The bank continued to expand into the 1970s. On September 19, 1970, it opened another branch in Roseville, California with a ceremony attended by Roseville Mayor Baron Reed, bank branch manager Jerry Zak, assistant branch manager Robert Easter, local employees, and Raffetto.[23] The bank's name appeared often in the local Mountain Democrat newspaper, either for dividend announcements,[24] its business condition,[25][26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33][34] employee news,[35][36] or sponsorship.[37][38][39][40][41] The bank became inactive on June 29, 1975, as part of its sale to Security Pacific National Bank (after further acquisitions most recently belonging to FIA Card Services as of 2014).[21]

Community

As a prominent businessman, Raffetto joined the publisher of the local newspaper and others in a Pacific Gas & Electric tour of the Feather River Project in June 1949[42] and received special birthday wishes from the newspaper for his 90th birthday.[43]

As a member of the Lions Club, Raffetto helped the local community deal with issues such as water management.[44]

Personal life and death

Raffetto married Ethel Quigley. They had one son and grandson.

Raffetto was a member of E Clampus Vitus.[45]

Raffetto died age 90 on April 5, 1988.

Legacy

Raffetto was noted for his contributions to the State of California,[46] including the California Legislature Assembly.[47]

Raffetto donated to the El Dorado County Library of Placerville.[48]

Raffetto, known to have "masterminded cooking" at local events,[49] also kept track of local lore, including the origins and recipe for the Placerville recipe for "Hangtown Fry" (see quote box).

Works

  • Ice cream; a textbook for student and manufacturer (1928)[16][50]
    • The ice cream industry (1947)[51]
    • The ice cream industry (1956)[52]

See also

References

  1. J.T. White, ed. (1977). The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography. p. 192. Retrieved 25 January 2019.
  2. "Oakland Mayor, Visiting Newspapermen, Other Dignitaries to Sample "Hangtown Fry" Breakfast". Mountain Democrat. 19 July 1951. pp. 12 (column 3).
  3. "Carlos S. "Nic" Nicolas". Mountain Democrat. April 26, 1995. p. 9. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  4. Yoholam, Betty (1 October 2001). I Remember" Stories and Pictures of El Dorado County Pioneer Families. Cedar Ridge Publishing. pp. 144–147. Retrieved 25 December 2018.
  5. "The Track Meet Saturday". Mountain Democrat. May 1, 1915. p. 1. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  6. The School Arts Magazine, Volume 14. School Arts Publishing Company. 1915. p. xvii. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  7. The Blue and Gold. University of California, Berkeley. 1919. pp. 394 (fraternity), 395 (photo). Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  8. The Blue and Gold. University of California, Berkeley. 1922. p. 89. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  9. Wooldridge, Jesse Walton (1931). History of the Sacramento Valley, California, Volume 2. Pioneer Historical Publishing Company. p. 420. Retrieved 25 January 2019.
  10. Wooldridge, Jesse Walton (1931). History of Sacramento Valley California, Vol. 2. Pioneer Historical Publishing Company. pp. 419–420. Retrieved 4 January 2014.
  11. Hoover, Mildred Brook; William N. Abeloe; Hero Eugene Rensch; Ethel Grace Rensch (1966). Historic Spots in California. Stanford University Press. pp. 80, 82. Retrieved 4 January 2014.
  12. Bidwell, John (1891). A Memorial and Biographical History of Northern California. Chicago: Lewish Publishing. p. 516.
  13. "home". Cary House. Retrieved 4 January 2014.
  14. "Historic Cary House Hotel". County of El Dorado. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  15. "Historic Cary House Hotel". Sierra Nevada GeoTourism MapGuide. Retrieved 31 January 2014.
  16. Turnbow, Grover Dean; Raffetto, Lloyd A. (1928). Ice cream; a textbook for student and manufacturer. J. Wiley & sons. Retrieved 25 January 2019.
  17. Raffety, Michael (29 April 2019). "Belltower: Past chamber presidents reflect local history". Mountain Democrat. pp. A4. Retrieved 18 August 2019.
  18. "Application for Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Membership". Mountain Democrat. February 28, 1958. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  19. "25 Years Ago". Mountain Democrat. January 25, 1988. p. 9. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  20. "The Bell with a Connection". Sierra Nevada Logging Museum. Retrieved 22 December 2012.
  21. "Mother Lode Bank". US Bank Locations. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  22. "Branch Application Sacramento". Mountain Democrat. July 4, 1957. p. 4. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  23. "Grand Opening". Press-Tribune from Roseville, California. September 21, 1970. p. 1. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  24. "Happy Holiday for Share Owners of Local Bank". Mountain Democrat. December 19, 1963. p. 1. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  25. "Report of Condition of Mother Lode Bank". Mountain Democrat. April 28, 1955. p. 6. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  26. "Report of Condition of Mother Lode Bank". Mountain Democrat. January 18, 1962. p. 5. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  27. "Report of Condition of Mother Lode Bank". Mountain Democrat. October 13, 1962. p. 32. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  28. "Report of Condition of Mother Lode Bank". Mountain Democrat. May 2, 1968. p. 9. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  29. "Report of Condition of Mother Lode Bank". Mountain Democrat. November 6, 1969. p. 8. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  30. "Report of Condition of Mother Lode Bank". Mountain Democrat. January 29, 1970. p. 22. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  31. "Report of Condition of Mother Lode Bank". Mountain Democrat. November 11, 1970. p. 8. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  32. "Report of Condition of Mother Lode Bank". Mountain Democrat. January 27, 1972. p. 6. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  33. "Report of Condition of Mother Lode Bank". Mountain Democrat. July 27, 1972. p. 10. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  34. "Report of Condition of Mother Lode Bank". Folsom Telegraph. December 16, 1965. p. 2. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  35. "Mother Lode Bank Lists Staff Changes". Mountain Democrat. January 6, 1972. p. 2. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  36. "New Manager". Mountain Democrat. July 25, 1974. p. 19. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  37. "Bonanza Barrel Event". Mountain Democrat. May 12, 1955. p. 1. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  38. "Stangland-Dillingers". Mountain Democrat. July 15, 1957. p. 4. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  39. "Final sign-up for Babe Ruth Final". Mountain Democrat. March 14, 1963. p. 2. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  40. "Mother Lode Bank Routs Placerville Lbr". Mountain Democrat. July 4, 1963. p. 17. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  41. "Gratitude". Mountain Democrat. September 19, 1968. p. 2. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  42. "Publisher Visits Grade School Giant Projects". Mountain Democrat. June 16, 1949. p. 6. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  43. "A Big Happy Birthday". Mountain Democrat. December 21, 1987. p. 3. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  44. "Lions Discuss Need of Water". Mountain Democrat. August 2, 2015. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  45. Robotham, N.H. (May 1949). "Clamperana of Ye Olde Days". The Pony Express: Stories of Pioneers and Old Trails. Herbert S. Hamlin: 9. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  46. Fifty Years of Service to California: A History of the Northern California Section, Society of American Foresters, 1916-1966. Society of American Foresters. Northern California Section. 1966. p. 29. Retrieved 25 January 2019.
  47. Journal of the Assembly, Legislature of the State of California. California Legislature Assembly. 1968. p. 62. Retrieved 25 January 2019.
  48. "Friends of the Library". Mountain Democrat. February 8, 1978. p. 9. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  49. "Wine tasting, gourmet dinner is feature of special Lions party". Mountain Democrat. October 3, 1957. p. 10. Retrieved December 6, 2018.
  50. Turnbow, Grover Dean; Raffetto, Lloyd A. (1928). Ice cream; a textbook for student and manufacturer. J. Wiley & sons. Retrieved 25 January 2019.
  51. Turnbow, Grover Dean; Raffetto, Lloyd A.; Tracy, Paul Hubert (1947). Ice cream; a textbook for student and manufacturer. J. Wiley & sons. Retrieved 25 January 2019.
  52. Turnbow, Grover Dean; Raffetto, Lloyd A.; Tracy, Paul Hubert (1956). Ice cream; a textbook for student and manufacturer. J. Wiley & sons. Retrieved 25 January 2019.

External sources

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