Little Ouseburn

Little Ouseburn is a small village and civil parish in the Harrogate district of North Yorkshire, England. It is situated near the A1(M) motorway and 6 miles (9.7 km) south-east of Boroughbridge. It consists of two roads, Main Street which is the residential area, and Church Lane which contains a Holy Trinity Church that is a grade I listed building.[3] It also has a small brick bridge over a stream which leads to Great Ouseburn. According to the 2011 census data the total population of Little Ouseburn is 264.

Little Ouseburn

Holy Trinity Church on Church Lane
Little Ouseburn
Location within North Yorkshire
Population264 (2011 census)[1]
OS grid referenceSE447606
Civil parish
  • Little Ouseburn
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townYork
Postcode districtYO26
PoliceNorth Yorkshire
FireNorth Yorkshire
AmbulanceYorkshire
EU ParliamentYorkshire and the Humber
UK Parliament

History and population

Little Ouseburn is listed (alongside Great Ouseburn) in the Domesday Book as having three plough lands and three villagers.[4] The name of the village derives from Ouse Beck, which divides Great and Little Ouseburn, with the beck being a tributary of the River Ouse.[5][6][7] The village is set out along both sides of Main Street, which runs on an east/west orientation.[8] Most of the villagers were either tenant farmers or workers for the nearby Kirby hall estate,[9] which is on the eastern side of the village across the Ouse Beck. Kirby Hall was designed by Roger Morris and built by John Carr.[10] The hall was demolished in the 1920s and the estate broken up, with most of the houses and land being sold to the villagers. A portion of the house exists as Kirby hall and is a grade II listed structure.[11][12][13]

In the 1870s Little Ouseburn was described as:

OUSEBURN (Little), a village, a township, and a parish in Great Ouseburn district, W. R. Yorkshire. The village stands ¾ of a mile S of Great Ouseburn village, and 3¼ N by W of Cattal r. station; and has a post-office under York.[14]

During the Second World War, the Moat Hall, a mansion house between the village and the church, was used as a hostel for some Land Army girls. The Moat hall and the land between the church were bombed, which is thought to be an overrun of a bombing sortie on the nearby RAF Linton-on-Ouse.[15] Also during the war, a bomber from RAF Tholthorpe lost control in icy conditions and crashed near to the church damaging the mausoleum and the church building.[16]

Census data shows that the population of Little Ouseburn dropped significantly between the years of 1840 and 1880 from around 600 to 250.[17] The 2001 census data stated that there were 226 people living in the parish,[18] since then the population has increased and the 2011 census data states that there are now 264 people living in Little Ouseburn.[1]

Geography

The village lies just to the east of the B6265 road which links Boroughbridge with the A59 road and is part of Dere Street.[9][19] The village is 6 miles (9.7 km) south east of Boroughbridge, 8 miles (13 km) east of Knaresborough, and 13 miles (21 km) north west of York.[20]

Industry

According to data from the 1831 census the primary industry in Little Ouseburn was focused on agriculture with almost 75% of men aged over 20 being involved in it.[21] This was reflected by the social status of the people living in Little Ouseburn with around half of them being labourers.[22] This was almost entirely just men, with women taking on the more traditional domestic chores. The 1881 census data shows how many people were involved in an occupation and their gender. Around 30 men worked in agriculture, 15 women in domestic service, but around 40 women were in unknown occupations. There was very little else the population was involved in.[23] 2001 census data shows that in more recent times the occupation of the inhabitants has shifted to manufacturing and retail with few people left working in agriculture.[24]

Housing

As with the population between 1840 and 1880, the number of houses in Little Ouseburn shrunk significantly.[25] This is most likely due to boundary changes. The number of houses began to increase after 1920. Before 1920 a very small percentage of houses were unoccupied. After 1920, every house has been occupied.[26] According to 2011 data there are 110 households and 223 vehicles. 43.6% of the households have two vehicles and 8.2% have four or more.[27]

See also

References

  1. UK Census (2011). "Local Area Report – Little Ouseburn Parish (E04007378)". Nomis. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  2. "The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 2007". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  3. Historic England. "Church of the Holy Trinity (1150296)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 28 January 2013.
  4. "[Little] Ouseburn | Domesday Book". opendomesday.org. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  5. Griffiths, Amanda (13 January 2010). "North Yorkshire's Great and Little Ouseburn". yorkshirelife.co.uk. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  6. Mills, A D (1993). A dictionary of English place names. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 358. ISBN 0192831313.
  7. "The Rivers Ouse; five distinct rivers. « Clean Rivers Trust". cleanriverstrust.co.uk. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  8. LOCACA 2008, p. 4.
  9. LOCACA 2008, p. 3.
  10. Blomfield, Reginald (1914). A short of renaissance architecture in England : 1500-1800. London: Bell. p. 201. OCLC 80392592.
  11. Historic England. "Kirby Hall  (Grade II) (1150293)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  12. Historic England. "Remains of former Kirby Hall  (Grade II) (1190739)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  13. "KIRBY HALL ESTATE. 3 MILES FROM BOROUGHBRIDGE, 12 MILES FROM YORK, AND CLOSE TO CATTAL STATION (NER). PLANS, PARTICULARS, AND CONDITIONS OF SALE OF THE FREEHOLD, RESIDENTIAL, AGRICULTURAL AND SPORTING ESTATE KNOWN AS THE KIRBY HALL ESTATE". discovery.nationalarchives.co.uk. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  14. Wilson, John (1870–72). "Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales". Edinburgh: A. Fullarton and Co. Retrieved 4 February 2013.
  15. Jeffries, Marion (2015). Yorkshire women at war : story of the Women's Land Army hostels. Barnsley: Pen & Sword. p. 192. ISBN 978-1-47384-909-9.
  16. Clark, Matt (8 January 2014). "Visiting a North Yorkshire church attended by Anne Brontë". York Press. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  17. "Little Ouseburn AP/CP through time". Retrieved 2 June 2013.
  18. "Key Figures for 2001 Census: Key Statistics". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 2 June 2013.
  19. "Water hazard threat to county drivers". York Press. 19 February 2007. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  20. "Genuki: Little Ouseburn, Yorkshire (West Riding)". www.genuki.org.uk. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  21. "Little Ouseburn AP/CP through time | Industry Statistics". A Vision of Britain through Time. Retrieved 2 June 2013.
  22. "Little Ouseburn AP/CP through time | Social Structure Statistics". A Vision of Britain through Time. Retrieved 2 June 2013.
  23. "Little Ouseburn AP/CP through time | Industry Statistics". A Vision of Britain through Time. Retrieved 2 June 2013.
  24. "Industry of Employment – All People, 2001". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 2 June 2013.
  25. "Ouseburn AP/CP through time | Housing Statistics". Vision of Britain through Time. Retrieved 2 June 2013.
  26. "Little Ouseburn AP/CP through time | Housing Statistics". A Vision of Britain through Time. Retrieved 2 June 2013.
  27. "Car or Van Availability, 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 2 June 2013.

Sources

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