List of shipwrecks in 1904

The list of shipwrecks in 1904 includes ships sunk, foundered, grounded, or otherwise lost during 1904.

table of contents
1904
Jan Feb Mar Apr
May Jun Jul Aug
Sep Oct Nov Dec
Unknown date
References

January

4 January

List of shipwrecks: 4 January 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Vernia  United States While the 6-gross register ton 28-foot (8.5 m) sloop, carrying a cargo of 4,000 pounds (1,800 kg) of fish and fishing gear and a crew of two, was transiting Lynn Canal in the Territory of Alaska in darkness during a voyage from Juneau to Hunter Bay, a squall struck which blew her onto a rock. The rock holed her, and she flooded, sank, and was battered to pieces on rocks. Her crew survived.[1]

7 January

List of shipwrecks: 7 January 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Fauvette  France The schooner sank just north of the Chausey Islands in the Channel Islands.[2]

8 January

List of shipwrecks: 8 January 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Clallam  United States The steamer foundered between Port Townsend, Washington and Victoria, British Columbia. 40 passengers and 10 crewmen killed.[3]

9 January

List of shipwrecks: 9 January 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Clallam Canada The Puget Sound Navigation Company passenger ship foundered after defective maintenance in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. At least 56 lives were lost.
John H. Starin  United States The steamer struck a submerged wreck two miles (3.2 km) south east of Bridgeport Light. She was brought into Bridgeport, Connecticut and beached.[4]

16 January

List of shipwrecks: 16 January 1904
ShipCountryDescription
John L. Brady  United States The packet struck a snag and sank in the Coosa River near Gadsden, Alabama. Raised and repaired.[5]

18 January

List of shipwrecks: 18 January 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Yvonne  United States The schooner was sunk in a collision with Vaquero ( United States) in the Red Fish Channel. Total loss. The crew were rescued by boats from Vaquero.[6]

22 January

List of shipwrecks: 22 January 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Alcedo  United States The steamer was sunk by ice near New Geneva, Pennsylvania.[7]
Barge No. 3  United States The barge sank in a collision with Barge No. 1 while anchored in Bayou St. John during a storm. One crewman from each barge was killed.[8]
Hornet  United States The steamer sunk by ice at Paden City, West Virginia.[9]
T. M. Bayne  United States The steamer sunk by ice at Paden City, West Virginia.[10]

23 January

List of shipwrecks: 23 January 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Lizzie Townsend  United States The steamer burned to the waterline at Wheeling, West Virginia.[11]
May  United States The steamer was crushed by ice in the Schuylkill River at the Walnut Street Wharf, Philadelphia .[12]

24 January

List of shipwrecks: 24 January 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Cascade  United States The tug was sunk by ice a half mile off Lorain, Ohio[13]
Elizabeth  United States The steamer burned at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.[14]
John K.  United States The steamer burned at Indian Village in Bayou Plaquemine.[15]
Olivette  United States The steamer burned at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.[16]

25 January

List of shipwrecks: 25 January 1904
ShipCountryDescription
B. F. Bennett  United States The steamer was sunk by ice at the mouth of the Cioto River. Total loss.[17]

26 January

List of shipwrecks: 26 January 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Adelle  United States The steamer was sunk at dock by ice at Coal Haven, Kentucky. Total loss. Her master and two crewmen killed.[18]

28 January

List of shipwrecks: 28 January 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Maryland  United States The barge was wrecked after losing her towline to John L. Brady ( United States) in a gale in the Galveston, Texas, area.[19]

29 January

List of shipwrecks: 29 January 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Columbia  United States The steamer sunk at dock at Cramp's Wharf, Philadelphia. Probably got caught under the dock on a rising tide and filled up and sank.[20]
Geo. M. Winslow  United States The tow steamer was wrecked in a snowstorm on Sow and Pigs Rocks on the west end of Cuttyhunk.[21]

30 January

List of shipwrecks: 30 January 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Bellevue  United States The steamer was sunk by ice at Louisville, Kentucky. Later raised.[22]

February

1 February

List of shipwrecks: 1 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Twilight  United States The tow steamer was driven on to rocks in Little Hell Gate in the East River by a squall and sank.[23]

2 February

List of shipwrecks: 2 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Atlas  United States The steamer was sunk by ice at dock in Thompsons Point, New Jersey .[24]
Wasp  United States The barge sprang a leak and sank off Winter Quarter in a gale with heavy seas.[25]

3 February

List of shipwrecks: 3 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Ethel  United States The steamer struck a snag in the Savannah River near Augusta, Georgia, and sank.[26]
Puritan  United States The barge sprang a leak and sank 6 nautical miles (11 km; 6.9 mi) south of Cape Henlopen, Delaware, in a gale with heavy seas.[27]

6 February

List of shipwrecks: 6 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Robert V. Rider  United States The 10-gross register ton sloop burned at Jones Bay, North Carolina. All three people on board survived.[28]

8 February

List of shipwrecks: 8 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Eilene  United States The laid up steamer was sunk at dock by ice in the Licking River at Newport, Kentucky. Raised and repaired.[29]
Tremont  United States The steamer burned at Pier 35 in the East River. One crewman killed.[30]

9 February

List of shipwrecks: 9 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Dora Retzlaff  Germany The cargo ship, owned by Reederei Emil R. Retzlaff., foundered 66 nautical miles (122 km) north east of Cape Vilano.[31]
Korietz  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: After suffering damage in the Battle of Chemulpo Bay, the Korietz-class gunboat was blown up by detonation of her ammunition magazines at Chemulpo, Korea, to avoid capture by the Japanese.
Madalene Cooney  United States The schooner's bow was holed by ice off Wilmington Creek, Delaware in the Delaware River and was beached.[32]
Retvizan  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War, Battle of Port Arthur: After a torpedo fired by an Imperial Japanese Navy destroyer struck her while she was anchored in the outer harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, the Retvizan class battleship got underway and ran aground in the narrow channel between the outer and inner harbors while trying to steam into the inner harbor. Five members of her crew died in the torpedo explosion.[33] She was refloated on 8 March and moved into the inner harbor, where repairs were completed on 3 June.
Startle  United States The 19-gross register ton sloop sank off Newport, Rhode Island. All eight people on board survived.[34]
Tsesarevich  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War, Battle of Port Arthur: After a torpedo fired by an Imperial Japanese Navy destroyer struck her while she was anchored in the outer harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, the Tsesarevich-class battleship got underway and steamed into the narrow channel into the inner harbor, where tugs took her in tow, but she ran aground in the channel before reaching the inner harbor.[33] One member of her crew died as a result of the torpedo hit. She was refloated and moved into the inner harbor, where repairs were completed on 7 June.
Varyag  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: After suffering damage in the Battle of Chemulpo Bay, the Varyag-class protected cruiser was scuttled at Chemulpo, Korea, to avoid capture by the Japanese. The Japanese later salvaged her and placed her in service as the protected cruiser Soya ( Imperial Japanese Navy).

11 February

List of shipwrecks: 11 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Fulton  United States The steamer dragged anchor and beached in a heavy gale at Port Orford, Oregon. One crewman was killed by falling deck cargo.[35]
Yenisei  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: The minelayer exploded and sank in Dalian Bay off Dalniy, Manchuria, China, after striking one of her own mines. Her commanding officer refused to leave her and went down with the ship.[36]

12 February

List of shipwrecks: 12 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Boyarin  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: The Boyarin-class protected cruiser struck a mine in Dalian Bay off Dalniy, Manchuria, China, on 11 February, killing ten crewmen, and was abandoned immediately. When she did not sink, her commanding officer ordered a destroyer to torpedo her, reaffirming the order twice when the destroyer′s commanding officer questioned scuttling a ship that was not in obvious danger of sinking. Both torpedoes fired at her missed, and she was left to drift as a derelict. Imperial Japanese Navy destroyers found her still afloat on 12 February and boarded her to remove some of her gear, again leaving her to drift unmanned in the bay. She finally sank in a storm on the evening of 12 February. An Imperial Russian Navy court of inquiry into her loss later found her commanding officer′s conduct in abandoning his ship so quickly and making no effort to save her despite her apparent continued seaworthiness to have been "irregular."[36]
Gertrude  United States The steamer struck rocks at Middle Francis Bend in the Chattahoochee River and sank in six feet (1.8 m) of water. Raised immediately.[37]
Juniata  United States The steamer was sunk by ice at Madison, Indiana,Madison, Indiana.[38]
Nagonoura Maru (or Nakanoura Maru)  Japan Russo-Japanese War: During a voyage to Otaru, Japan, the 1,804-ton merchant ship was sunk by gunfire in the Sea of Japan off the Tsugaru Strait by a cruiser squadron consisting of the armored cruisers Gromoboi, Rossia, and Rurik and the protected cruiser Bogatyr (all  Imperial Russian Navy).[39][40]
New Orleans  United States The steamer was damaged by ice and beached on Plum Point, Virginia. Refloated and towed to Baltimore, Maryland for repairs.[41]

13 February

List of shipwrecks: 13 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Alice  United States The packet struck a deadhead and sank in the Pascagoula River. Raised and repaired.[42]

14 February

List of shipwrecks: 14 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Eagle  United States The steamer was sunk by ice at Norwalk, Connecticut.[43]

21 February

List of shipwrecks: 21 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Jim Brown  United States The steamer filled with water and sank at dock at Glenwood Landing, Pennsylvania. Raised, repaired and returned to service.[44]

22 February

List of shipwrecks: 22 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Thomas McNally  United States The canal boat was sunk in a collision with Baltimore ( United States) off Seventeenth Street, New York City.[45]

23 February

List of shipwrecks: 23 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Bushu Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: Approaching the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, to be sunk as a blockship in the entrance, the 1,249-gross register ton transport was sunk with a scuttling charge outside the entrance by her crew, which had become disoriented by the glare of Russian searchlights and believed they had reached the entrance and that the blockship Jinsen Maru had scuttled herself up at the planned location and that they were in the correct scuttling place relative to Jinsen Maru's position.[46][47] Sources differ as to casualties and the rescue of the crews of the five blockships. Casualties among the five blockships combined either was one killed[46] or three wounded.[47] Either each blockship crew was rescued by its ship's designated escort/rescue vessel.[47]Bushu Maru's was the torpedo boat Tsubami[46] ( Imperial Japanese Navy) – or the designated escort/rescue vessels rescued three of the blockship crews and the other two crews escaped in their ship's boats.[46]
Buyo Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: Approaching the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, to be sunk as a blockship in the entrance, the 1,153-gross register ton transport was sunk with a scuttling charge outside the entrance by her crew, which had become disoriented by the glare of Russian searchlights and believed they had reached the entrance and that the blockship Jinsen Maru had scuttled herself up at the planned location and that they were in the correct scuttling place relative to Jinsen Maru's position.[46] Sources differ as to casualties and the rescue of the crews of the five blockships. Casualties among the five blockships combined either was one killed[46] or three wounded.[47] Either each blockship crew was rescued by its ship's designated escort/rescue vessel.[47]Buyo Maru's was the torpedo boat Manazuru[46] ( Imperial Japanese Navy) – or the designated escort/rescue vessels rescued three of the blockship crews and the other two crews escaped in their ship's boats.[46]
Hokoku Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: Approaching the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, to be sunk as a blockship in the entrance, the 2,776-gross register ton transport came under fire by the stranded battleship Retvizan ( Imperial Russian Navy). Retvizan's gunfire disabled her steering gear, cut the detonator wires to her scuttling charge, and set her on fire, and she ran aground just outside the west end of the harbor entrance. Her crew abandoned her, leaving her in flames.[46][47] Sources differ as to casualties and the rescue of the crews of the five blockships. Casualties among the five blockships combined either was one killed[46] or three wounded.[47] Either each blockship crew was rescued by its ship's designated escort/rescue vessel.[47]Hokoku Maru's was the torpedo boat Hayabusa[46] ( Imperial Japanese Navy) – or the designated escort/rescue vessels rescued three of the blockship crews and the other two crews escaped in their ship's boats.[46]
Jinsen Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: Approaching the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, to be sunk as a blockship in the entrance, the 2,331-gross register ton transport ran hard aground on a rock outside the entrance. Her crew sank her with a scuttling charge and abandoned her.[46] Sources differ as to casualties and the rescue of the crews of the five blockships. Casualties among the five blockships combined either was one killed[46] or three wounded.[47] Either each blockship crew was rescued by its ship's designated escort/rescue vessel.[47]Jinsen Maru's was the torpedo boat Kasasagi[46] ( Imperial Japanese Navy) – or the designated escort/rescue vessels rescued three of the blockship crews and the other two crews escaped in their ship's boats.[46]
Mary and Ida  United States The 174-net register ton, 110.2-foot (33.6 m) cod-fishing schooner dragged her anchor during a gale and was wrecked at Unga Island in the Shumagin Islands off the south coast of the Alaska Peninsula. Her entire crew of eight survived.[48]
Tenshu Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: Steaming toward Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, to be sunk as a blockship in the entrance to the harbor there, the 2,943-gross register ton transport ran aground and was wrecked 3 miles (4.8 km) from the entrance.[46] Casualties among the five blockships combined either was one killed[46] or three wounded.[47] Either each blockship crew was rescued by its ship's designated escort/rescue vessel.[47]Tenshu Maru's was the torpedo boat Chidori[46] ( Imperial Japanese Navy) – or the designated escort/rescue vessels rescued three of the blockship crews and the other two crews escaped in their ship's boats.[46]

24 February

List of shipwrecks: 24 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Eliza  United States The steamer was pushed by ice and current into an obstruction at McKeesport, Pennsylvania causing her to sink. Raised and repaired.[49]
Teaser  United States The steamer was sunk by a piling while docked, Norfolk, Virginia. Raised and repaired.[50]

25 February

List of shipwrecks: 25 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
No. 221  Imperial Russian Navy The torpedo boat sank in the Mediterranean Sea during a storm.[51][52]
Vnushitelni  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: The Forel-class destroyer was sunk by gunfire in Golubinaya Bight in Pigeon Bay on the southwestern end of the Liaotung Peninsula, Manchuria, China, by the protected cruisers Chitose, Kasagi, Takasago, and Yoshino (all  Imperial Japanese Navy).[53][54][55]

27 February

List of shipwrecks: 27 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
M. F. Plant  United States The steamer's bow was holed by an obstruction off Marcushook, Pennsylvania in the Delaware River and sank in shallow water. Later raised.[56]

28 February

List of shipwrecks: 28 February 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Norfolk  United States The steamer burned to the waterline at Sewells Point.[57]
Sehome  United States The 11-gross register ton, 38.2-foot (11.6 m) schooner dragged her anchors during a storm and was wrecked in Lynn Canal in Southeast Alaska. Her crew of two survived.[58]

March

2 March

List of shipwrecks: 2 March 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Lotus  United States The laid up steamer was sunk at dock by ice at Cincinnati, Ohio. Total loss.[59]
Monterey  United States The steamer was caught in a heavy windstorm in the Ohio River and sank near Diamond Island, Kentucky. Raised and repaired.[60]

3 March

List of shipwrecks: 3 March 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Michael J. Coffey  United States The tow steamer listed in a squall causing her to fill and sink in the North River.[61]

4 March

List of shipwrecks: 4 March 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Handel  Belgium The cargo ship foundered in the North Sea, off Ramsgate, England. All crew were rescued.[62]
Hyack  United States The launch, and the launch Wolverine ( United States), were towing the schooner Queen ( United States) when Wolverine's tow line parted and fouled Hyack's prop. The schooner then ran down and sank the launch, probably around Seattle.[63]

6 March

List of shipwrecks: 6 March 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Valvoline  United States The freighter caught fire at Pier 8 in the East River. She sank after being towed out of port.[64]

10 March

List of shipwrecks: 10 March 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Edgar Cherry  United States The steamer struck the lock gates of Lock No. 4 in the Monongahela River and sank.[65]
Steregushchi  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: Badly damaged and having suffered heavy casualties in combat with four Imperial Japanese Navy destroyers in the Lau-ti-shan Channel near Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, the Kretchet-class destroyer surrendered to the Japanese destroyers. However, her crew had opened the ship's Kingston valves in order to scuttle her, and two crewmen locked themselves in her engine room, sacrificing their lives to ensure that the Japanese could not enter, close the valves, and take the ship as a prize of war. The Japanese attempted to tow the sinking destroyer, but the towline broke, and she sank with the loss of all hands.[66][67][68]
Sunshine  United States The steamer burned between Memphis, Tennessee and Cincinnati, Ohio, probably close to Memphis. One crewman killed.[69]

11 March

List of shipwrecks: 11 March 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Shenango No. 1  United States The steamer while stuck in ice caught fire in the engine room and was destroyed off the Conneaut, Ohio breakwater. One crewman killed.[70]

13 March

List of shipwrecks: 13 March 1904
ShipCountryDescription
City of Boston  United States The ferry struck a waterlogged and abandoned mud scow adrift in the channel in Boston Harbor off Boston, Massachusetts. and was beached to prevent her from sinking.[71]

17 March

List of shipwrecks: 17 March 1904
ShipCountryDescription
M. B. Goble  United States The steamer capsized at the mouth of the Big Sandy River. Total loss. Two crewmen killed.[72]

18 March

List of shipwrecks: 18 March 1904
ShipCountryDescription
HMS A1  Royal Navy The Holland-class submarine was accidentally rammed by Berwick Castle ( United Kingdom) and sunk with the loss of all eleven crew in The Solent. She was later raised, repaired, and returned to service.

23 March

List of shipwrecks: 23 March 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Ida  United States The tow steamer struck a bridge pier and sank at Memphis, Tennessee.[73]

25 March

List of shipwrecks: 25 March 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Columbia  United States The steamer was sunk by a snag near Charleston, West Virginia. Raised and repaired.[74]

26 March

List of shipwrecks: 26 March 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Hanyei Maru  Japan Russo-Japanese War: The 64- or 76-gross register ton (sources disagree) steamer was seized by a force of Imperial Russian Navy warships and after the removal of her crew and passengers was sunk by gunfire by Russian destroyers in Lau-ti-shan Channel just off the Miao-tao Islands.[40][75]

27 March

List of shipwrecks: 27 March 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Chiyo Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The crew of the 1,746-gross register ton transport used an explosive charge to scuttle her as a blockship just outside and to the west of the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, in a failed attempt to block the entrance.[76]
Fukui Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The 2,943-gross register ton transport was torpedoed by Russian forces in the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, as she maneuvered to her planned scuttling position so that her crew could sink her in the entrance as a blockship. Her crew then used an explosive charge to scuttle her just outside and to the west of the entrance but failed to block it.[76]
Yahiko Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The transport's crew used an explosive charge to scuttle her as a blockship just inside the west side of the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, in a failed attempt to block the entrance.[76]
Yoneyama Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The 2,693-gross register ton transport was torpedoed by Russian forces while her crew prepared to scuttle her as a blockship at the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China. She sank just outside and east of the entrance and failed to block it.[76]

31 March

List of shipwrecks: 31 March 1904
ShipCountryDescription
George P. Taylor  United States The tug was sunk in a collision with Navahoe ( United States) in the North River.[77]

Unknown date

List of shipwrecks: Unknown date 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Hailar  Russia Russo-Japanese War: The steamer was reported on 15 March 1904 to have been scuttled as a blockship at the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, by the Imperial Russian Navy during March.[78]
Harbin  Russia Russo-Japanese War: The Chinese Eastern Railway steamer was reported on 15 March 1904 to have been scuttled as a blockship at the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, by the Imperial Russian Navy during March.[78]
Ninguta  Russia Russo-Japanese War: The steamer was reported on 15 March 1904 to have been scuttled as a blockship at the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, by the Imperial Russian Navy during March.[78]
Sungari  Russia Russo-Japanese War: The steamer was reported on 15 March 1904 to have been scuttled as a blockship at the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, by the Imperial Russian Navy during March.[78]

April

9 April

List of shipwrecks: 9 April 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Aurora  United States The steamer struck an unknown object in the Blackwater River and was beached.[79]
Peerless  United States The motor vessel was sunk by ice at Painted Woods, North Dakota.[80]

11 April

List of shipwrecks: 11 April 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Colon  United States The steamer was damaged on Remedios Reef, El Salvador and was beached at Acajulta, El Salvador. A total loss.[81]
Frank Canfield  United States The tug was wrecked at Point Au Sable, Michigan when her steering gear broke. The vessel was a total loss. Three crewmen were killed and two were rescued by life saving crew stationed on the point.[82]

12 April

List of shipwrecks: 12 April 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Alice  United States The barge was sunk in a collision with the steamer Barnstable ( United Kingdom) off the Eddystone Wharf at Eddystone, Pennsylvania .[83]

13 April

List of shipwrecks: 13 April 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Petropavlovsk  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: The Petropavlovsk-class battleship struck a mine in Korea Bay off Port Arthur Manchuria, China. The mine's detonation caused the explosions of several ammunition magazines and boilers in a chain reaction, and she sank in about a minute with the loss of 646 lives. Vice Admiral Stepan Makarov, commander-in-chief of the Pacific Squadron ( Imperial Russian Navy), was among the dead. Her 89 survivors were rescued by Russian warships.[84]
Strashni  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: The Kretchet-class destroyer was sunk by six Imperial Japanese Navy torpedo boats in Korea Bay off the Elliot Islands.[66][67]

14 April

List of shipwrecks: 14 April 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Baron Lambermont  Belgium The SA Tonnage, Antwerp cargo ship struck rocks and sank at Cape Blanc, Bizerte, Tunisia.[85]
Evangeline  United States The steamer burned and sank in the Escambia River.[86]

16 April

List of shipwrecks: 16 April 1904
ShipCountryDescription
No. 185  United States The barge was sunk off the Horse Shoe Buoy in a gale.[87]

20 April

List of shipwrecks: 20 April 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Levi Hart  United States The schooner was sunk when she tried to cut between two barges being towed in Pollock Rip slue.[88]

23 April

List of shipwrecks: 23 April 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Arthur McArdle  United States The schooner was wrecked when forced onto Egg Island, near Bermuda, by strong current.[89]

25 April

List of shipwrecks: 25 April 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Goyo Maru  Japan Russo-Japanese War: With a cargo of fish on board, the 600-gross register ton merchant ship was boarded, searched, torpedoed, and sunk by Imperial Russian Navy torpedo boats in the harbor at Gensan, Korea.[40][90]
Haginoura Maru (or Oginoura Maru)  Japan Russo-Japanese War: The 219- or 220-gross register ton merchant ship was sunk in the Sea of Japan off Korea by a squadron consisting of the armored cruisers Gromoboi and Rossia, the protected cruiser Bogatyr, and torpedo boats (all  Imperial Russian Navy).[40][90]
Hai Tien  Imperial Chinese Navy Steaming in fog, the protected cruiser overshot the entrance to the Yangtze River and was wrecked on a pinnacle rock just off the Shengsi Islands in Hangzhou Bay on the coast of China. Chinese customs cruisers rescued her crew.

26 April

List of shipwrecks: 26 April 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Kinshu Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The armed transport was stopped in the Sea of Japan off Gensan, Korea, by a squadron consisting of the armored cruisers Gromoboi and Rossia, the protected cruiser Bogatyr, and torpedo boats (all  Imperial Russian Navy). Her crew surrendered and was removed, but a company of Imperial Japanese Army infantry on board refused to surrender, so the Russians torpedoed her with the soldiers still on board. The soldiers then opened rifle fire on the nearest cruiser, and the Russian squadron opened gunnery fire on Kinshu Maru and sank her in about 15 minutes, Rossia receiving the credit for the sinking. The Japanese soldiers continued to fire until Kinshu Maru sank beneath them.[91][92]

30 April

List of shipwrecks: 30 April 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Pocahontas  United States The steamer burned to the waterline at Richmond, Virginia.[93]

May

3 May

List of shipwrecks: 3 May 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Aikoku Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: Approaching the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, where she was to be scuttled as a blockship, the 1,781-gross register ton transport struck a mine 110 yards (100 m) off the entrance and sank instantly, failing in her attempt to block the entrance. Eight of her 24 crewmen were left missing.[94]
Asagao Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The 2,464-gross register ton transport was scuttled as a blockship just outside the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, in a failed attempt to block the entrance. Her entire crew of 18 was left missing.[94]
Mikawa Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The 1,967-gross register ton transport was scuttled as a blockship just inside the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, in a failed attempt to block the entrance. One of her 18 crewmen was killed.[94]
Odaru Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The 2,547-gross register ton transport was scuttled as a blockship at the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, in a failed attempt to block the entrance. Her entire crew of 18 men was left missing.[94]
Sagami Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The 1,926-gross register ton transport was scuttled as a blockship at the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, in a failed attempt to block the entrance. One member of her crew was killed, and her other 23 crewmen were left missing.[94]
Sakura Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The 2,978-gross register ton transport was scuttled as a blockship just outside the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, in a failed attempt to block the entrance. One member of her crew was killed, and her other 19 crewmen were left missing.[94]
Totomi Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The 1,953-gross register ton transport was scuttled as a blockship just inside the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, in a failed attempt to block the entrance. Three of her 18-man crew were left missing.[94]
Yedo Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The 1,724-gross register ton transport was scuttled as a blockship at the entrance to the harbor at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, in a failed attempt to block the entrance. Two of her 18-man crew were killed.[94]

12 May

List of shipwrecks: 12 May 1904
ShipCountryDescription
No. 48  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The torpedo boat struck a mine and sank in Kerr Bay on the Korea Bay coast of the Liaotung Peninsula with the loss of seven of her crew.[95]

13 May

List of shipwrecks: 13 May 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Ottawa  United States The steamer became waterlogged 2 12 miles (4.0 km) off the Sturgeon Bay Canal. She was towed into the canal basin and sank. The crew made it to shore in small boats.[96]

14 May

List of shipwrecks: 14 May 1904
ShipCountryDescription
City of Rossford  United States The steamer sank at anchor in Sandusky Bay when caulking worked out of her butts.[97]
Miyako  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The Miyako-class unprotected cruiser struck a mine and sank in the harbor off Dalniy, Manchuria, China, with the loss of two crewmen.
Pleiades  United States The schooner was sunk in a collision in thick fog with Morro Castle ( United States).[98]

15 May

List of shipwrecks: 15 May 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Bogatyr  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: The Bogatyr-class protected cruiser ran aground in a rock in Amur Bay near Vladivostok, Russia. She was later refloated and docked at Vladivostok, but was too badly damaged to be repaired until after the Russo-Japanese War ended in 1905.
Hatsuse  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The Shikishima-class battleship sank in Korea Bay off Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, at 38°37′N 121°20′E when her ammunition magazine detonated after she struck two Russian mines. A total of 496 sailors were lost; 366 were saved.
Tatsuta  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The unprotected cruiser ran aground in the Elliot Islands in Korea Bay. She was refloated, repaired, and returned to service.[99]
Yashima  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The Fuji-class battleship capsized and sank in Korea Bay near Encounter Rock at 38°34′N 121°40′E eight hours after striking a Russian mine off Port Arthur, Manchuria, China.
Yoshino  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The protected cruiser capsized and sank after she was accidentally rammed by the armored cruiser Kasuga ( Imperial Japanese Navy) in fog in Korea Bay. A total of 318 sailors were lost; of her 101 survivors, Kasuga′s boats picked up 96 and other Japanese vessels rescued five.[100]

16 May

List of shipwrecks: 16 May 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Balclutha  United States During a voyage from San Francisco, California, to Karluk, Territory of Alaska, carrying 80 fishermen, 20 crewmen, and a cargo of cannery supplies, sheep and cattle, the 1,554-ton, 256.3-foot (78.1 m) ship was wrecked in fog and darkness without loss of life on a reef in the Geese Island Strait in the Kodiak Archipelago. She later was sold, refloated, repaired, and returned to service with the name Star of Alaska ( United States).[101]

17 May

List of shipwrecks: 17 May 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Akatsuki  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The destroyer struck a mine and sank off Dalniy, Manchuria, China.[92][102]

18 May

List of shipwrecks: 18 May 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Ōshima  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The gunboat collided in fog with the gunboat Akagi ( Imperial Japanese Navy) in Society Bay between Murchison Island and Point Hudson on the Liaotung Peninsula in Manchuria, China, and sank without loss of life at 39°01′N 121°08′E.[102]

22 May

List of shipwrecks: 22 May 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Dixie  United States The small pleasure craft was destroyed when it ran under the wheel of Sunshine ( United States) in the Louisville, Kentucky area.[103]

24 May

List of shipwrecks: 24 May 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Alton  United States The freighter foundered in rough weather in San Francisco Bay. Salvaged and converted into an oil barge.[104]

26 May

List of shipwrecks: 26 May 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Fred Wilson  United States The steamer was destroyed when her boilers exploded at West Louisville, Kentucky. 11 crewmen killed, 12 wounded.[105]
Vnimatelni  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: The Forel-class destroyer ran aground either on a rock in Pigeon Bay or off Murchison Island in Kinchau Bay off the coast of the Liaotung Peninsula, Manchuria, China. The destroyer Vuinoslivi ( Imperial Russian Navy) destroyed her with a torpedo to prevent her capture by Japanese forces.[53][54][106][107]

29 May

List of shipwrecks: 29 May 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Joe Pinkett  United States The vessel caught fire at dock at Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, when a kerosene lamp exploded. The fire was put out by the fire department. When a fireman went to check to hold to make sure the fire was out there was an explosion that sank the vessel and mortally wounding the fireman who died on 31 May. The vessel was raised the next day.[108]

30 May

List of shipwrecks: 30 May 1904
ShipCountryDescription
M. Shields  United States The steamer burned at dock at Portage Lake, Michigan.[109]
O. B. Green  United States The tug sank in the south branch of the Chicago River.[110]
Westford  United States The steamer burned to the waterline in Georgian Bay.[111]

June

3 June

List of shipwrecks: 3 June 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Chattanooga  United States The steamer struck a rock reef at Big Chain on the Tennessee River and sank due to an aide to navigation being out of place.[112]

4 June

List of shipwrecks: 4 June 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Niagara  United States The steamer was wrecked in fog and heavy seas on Knife Island off the north shore of Lake Superior. Her boiler and machinery were salvaged.[113]

13 June

List of shipwrecks: 13 June 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Vixen  United States The steamer sank in the St. Johns River. One crewman jumped overboard and drowned.[114]

15 June

List of shipwrecks: 15 June 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Fanchon  United States The steamer was sunk in the Harbor at Duluth, Minnesota, when her hull was slashed by the prop of Sonora ( United States). Later raised.[115]
General Slocum  United States The excursion paddle steamer caught fire and burned out on the East River in New York City before beaching herself and sinking in shallow water off North Brother Island just off the shore of the Bronx, New York. A total of 1,021, or 958, lives were lost, 180 injured.[116]
Hitachi Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War, Hitachi Maru Incident: The armed transport was sunk by gunfire by the armored cruiser Gromoboi ( Imperial Russian Navy) in the southern Korean Strait with the loss of 1,086 passengers and crew; 152 survived.[92]
Izumi Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War, Hitachi Maru Incident: The armed transport, operating as an unmarked hospital ship, was sunk by gunfire from the armored cruiser Gromoboi ( Imperial Russian Navy) in the southern Korean Strait.[92]

16 June

List of shipwrecks: 16 June 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Ansei Maru  Japan Russo-Japanese War: The 105-gross register ton sailing vessel was captured and sunk in the Sea of Japan near the Oki Islands by a squadron consisting of the armored cruisers Gromoboi, Rossia, and Rurik (all  Imperial Russian Navy).[117]
Hatsiman Maru  Japan Russo-Japanese War: The schooner was captured and sunk in the Sea of Japan by a squadron consisting of the armored cruisers Gromoboi, Rossia, and Rurik (all  Imperial Russian Navy).[117]
Sado Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War, Hitachi Maru Incident: The auxiliary cruiser, operating as a troopship, grounded on Okinoshima 30 hours after the armored cruiser Rurik ( Imperial Russian Navy) torpedoed her twice in the southern Korean Strait, killing 239 of her passengers and crew.
Seiyei Maru  Japan Russo-Japanese War: The 114-gross register ton sailing vessel was captured and sunk in the Sea of Japan by a squadron consisting of the armored cruisers Gromoboi, Rossia, and Rurik (all  Imperial Russian Navy).[117]
Yawata Maru  Japan Russo-Japanese War: The 198-gross register ton sailing vessel was captured and sunk in the Sea of Japan near the Oki Islands by a squadron consisting of the armored cruisers Gromoboi, Rossia, and Rurik (all  Imperial Russian Navy).[117]

17 June

List of shipwrecks: 17 June 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Costa Rican  United Kingdom The cargo ship ran aground at Plum Point, Jamaica. She later was refloated and towed to New York City in the United States. She subsequently was scrapped.[118]
HMS Sparrowhawk  Royal Navy During fleet exercises off the coast of China, the destroyer struck an uncharted rock in the East China Sea off the mouth of the Yangtze and sank without loss of life.

18 June

List of shipwrecks: 18 June 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Highlander  United States The steamer burned to the waterline and sank in the Santee River 25 miles (40 km) above Georgetown.[119]

20 June

List of shipwrecks: 20 June 1904
ShipCountryDescription
T. N. Barnesdall  United States The steamer struck a log and sank at Broadfields Landing, West Virginia, in five feet (1.5 m) of water .[120]

22 June

List of shipwrecks: 22 June 1904
ShipCountryDescription
39T  Regia Marina The Aldebaran-class torpedo boat sank after colliding with the torpedo boats 68S and 153S (both  Regia Marina).[121][122]
Mabel  United States The yacht caught fire in the Passaic River and was beached and the fire put out.[123]

23 June

List of shipwrecks: 23 June 1904
ShipCountryDescription
F. H. Prince  United States The freighter struck an obstruction off the Cleveland, Ohio breakwater and was beached.[124]

26 June

List of shipwrecks: 26 June 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Nonpareil  United States The steamer was sunk in the Harbor at Duluth, Minnesota, by a large chunk of coal that was dropped into her hold.[125]

28 June

List of shipwrecks: 28 June 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Monohansett  United States The paddle steamer ran aground at Little Misery Island, Massachusetts.
No. 51  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The torpedo boat was wrecked on Dangerous Reef in Korea Bay off Kerr Bay near Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, and sank.[92]
Norge  Denmark The Dampskibs-selskabet Thingvalla A/S ocean liner ran aground, then sank on Hasselwood Rock, Atlantic Ocean. A total of 635 lives were lost.

30 June

List of shipwrecks: 30 June 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Koun Maru  Japan Russo-Japanese War: The 57-gross register ton merchant ship was sunk by Imperial Russian Navy torpedo boats at Gensan, Korea.[117]
Seisho Maru  Japan Russo-Japanese War: The 122-gross register ton merchant ship was sunk by Imperial Russian Navy torpedo boats at Gensan, Korea.[117]
No. 204  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: The torpedo boat ran aground off Gensan, Korea, and was blown up by her crew to prevent her capture by Japanese forces.[126]

July

2 July

List of shipwrecks: 2 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Jeanette  United States The steamer took on a list and sank at dock in Salem, Massachusetts, while unloading cargo. Later raised with no damage.[127]

4 July

List of shipwrecks: 4 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Wichita  United States The steamer burned at Vicksburg, Mississippi.[128]

5 July

List of shipwrecks: 5 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
City of Denver  United States The steamer burned in Sullivan's Slough.[129]
Kaimon  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The corvette struck a mine and sank at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, at 38°50′N 121°50′E with the loss of 23 crew members.
Mary D. Hume  United States The steamer grounded on the bottom of the Nushagak River and started leaking. She freed herself four hours later and either sank in seven fathoms (42 ft; 13 m) of water. Reportedly was saved.[130]

6 July

List of shipwrecks: 6 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
George W. Humphrey  United States The fishing steamer was wrecked on Brentons Reef.[131]
Mabel Bird  United States The fishing steamer was wrecked on a rock in Ipswich Bay.[132]

10 July

List of shipwrecks: 10 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Jennie Hays  United States The fishing steamer caught fire eight miles (13 km) off Fairport, Ohio in Lake Erie and was beached.[133]

11 July

List of shipwrecks: 11 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Chalmette  United States The steamer struck an obstruction 35 miles below Natchez, Mississippi tearing a hole in her hull. Total loss.[134]

13 July

List of shipwrecks: 13 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
No. 208  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: The No. 208-class torpedo boat struck a mine and sank off Skryplev Island near Vladivostok, Russia.[135]

15 July

List of shipwrecks: 15 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Henry D. McCord  United States The tug was sunk in a collision with USS Apache ( United States Navy) off Pier 5 in the East River.[136]
West Farms  United States The tug was capsized in a collision with a float being towed by Transfer No. 16 ( United States) off Pier 3 in the East River.[137]

16 July

List of shipwrecks: 16 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Hipsang  United Kingdom Russo-Japanese War: During a voyage from Newchwang to Chefoo, China, with a cargo that included provisions, the 1,659-ton merchant ship was torpedoed and sunk by the destroyer Rastoropni ( Imperial Russian Navy) after she refused to stop for inspection.[138]

20 July

List of shipwrecks: 20 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Hokusei Maru  Japan Russo-Japanese War: The 91-gross register ton schooner was captured and sunk in the Pacific Ocean near the Tsugaru Strait by a squadron consisting of the armored cruisers Gromoboi, Rossia, and Rurik (all  Imperial Russian Navy).[138]
Ida  United States The steamer was attempting to land at a dock at Catawba Island on Lake Erie in heavy seas when she was thrown into the dock, breaking her bulwarks. She then listed, losing part of her cargo of stone, and sank.[139]
Kiho Maru  Japan Russo-Japanese War: The 140-gross register ton sailing vessel was captured and sunk in the Pacific Ocean near the Tsugaru Strait by a squadron consisting of the armored cruisers Gromoboi, Rossia, and Rurik (all  Imperial Russian Navy).[138]
Okassima Maru  Japan Russo-Japanese War: The merchant ship was captured and sunk in the Sea of Japan by Imperial Russian Navy forces.[138]
Takashima Maru  Japan Russo-Japanese War: Carrying a cargo of 160 boxes of gunpowder for use in mining and 589 bales of miscellaneous goods, the 319-gross register ton merchant ship was captured and sunk off the Tsugaru Strait by a squadron consisting of the armored cruisers Gromoboi, Rossia, and Rurik (all  Imperial Russian Navy).[138]

21 July

List of shipwrecks: 21 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Geo. C. Markham  United States The steamer was sunk at dock when struck by Geo. L. Craig ( United States) at Marine City, Michigan.[140]
R. Dunbar  United States The steamer struck a hidden obstruction at Mitlocks Bar in the Cumberland River and sank in 5 feet of water.[141]

22 July

List of shipwrecks: 22 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Castanet  United States The steamer caught fire shortly after leaving Kingston, Ontario due to a failure in her furnace. She was beached after the fire was extinguished. with light damage.[142]

24 July

List of shipwrecks: 24 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Fukuju Maru  Japan Russo-Japanese War: The 121-gross register ton schooner was captured and sunk in the Pacific Ocean near Tokyo Bay by a squadron consisting of the armored cruisers Gromoboi, Rossia, and Rurik (all  Imperial Russian Navy).[143]
Hakutsu Maru  Japan Russo-Japanese War: The 91-gross register ton merchant vessel was captured and sunk in the Sea of Japan by Imperial Russian Navy forces.[143]
Jizai Maru  Japan Russo-Japanese War: The 199-gross register ton schooner was captured and sunk in the Pacific Ocean near Tokyo Bay by a squadron consisting of the armored cruisers Gromoboi, Rossia, and Rurik (all  Imperial Russian Navy).[143]
Knight Commander  United Kingdom Russo-Japanese War: During a voyage from New York City to Chemulpo, Korea, with a cargo of general and railway material, the 4,306-gross register ton merchant ship was captured and sunk in the Pacific Ocean 75 nautical miles (139 km) southwest of Yokohama, Japan, by a squadron consisting of the armored cruisers Gromoboi, Rossia, and Rurik (all  Imperial Russian Navy).[143]
Leitenant Burakov  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: The destroyer was torpedoed and sunk in Ta Ho Bay on the coast of China east of Port Arthur by picket boats from the battleships Mikasa and Fuji (both  Imperial Japanese Navy).[53]

25 July

List of shipwrecks: 25 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Della A.  United States The fishing steamer burned at McKees Harbor, Lopez Island.[144]
Thea  Germany Russo-Japanese War: During a voyage to Yokohama with a cargo of fish manure and fish oil, the 1,613-gross register ton merchant ship was captured and sunk in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Japan by a squadron consisting of the armored cruisers Gromoboi, Rossia, and Rurik (all  Imperial Russian Navy).[143]
Thomas Chubb  United States The tug struck a sunken wreck in the basin at Albany, New York, and sank.[145]

25 July

List of shipwrecks: 25 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
City of Rockland  United States The steamer ran aground in dense fog on the Upper Gangway Ledge Mussel Ridge Channel, Maine. Her pumps couldn't keep up and she drifted onto the Northwest Ledge and sank. raised and repaired.[146]

28 July

List of shipwrecks: 28 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Enigma  United States The steamer burned in San Juan Pass.[147]
John P. Hopkins  United States The steamer was sunk at dock when New Orleans ( United States) lost the tow line to her tow causing her to veer off course and strike a scow tied up at the same dock and pushing it into the Hopkins at the Lake Street Bridge, Chicago sinking her. Raised and repaired.[148]

29 July

List of shipwrecks: 29 July 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Oregon  United States The steamer burned in Florida in the Halifax River near the mouth of the Tomoka River.[149]

Unknown date

List of shipwrecks: Unknown date 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Rio Douro  Norway The barque, owned by B Berg, was stranded. She was refloated in 1905 and scrapped.
W J Pirrie  United Kingdom The full-rigged ship was severely damaged by fire at Tocopilla, Chile. Subsequently hulked.[150]

August

2 August

List of shipwrecks: 2 August1904
ShipCountryDescription
Sivuch  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: The Sivuch-class gunboat′s crew scuttled her by blowing her up on the Liao River in China to prevent her capture by approaching Imperial Japanese Army forces.[151]

3 August

List of shipwrecks: 3 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Monohansett  United States The steamer was wrecked in dense fog on rocks between Big Misery Island and Little Misery Island off Beverly, Massachusetts.[152]

4 August

List of shipwrecks: 4 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Viking  United States Carrying a 200-ton cargo of general merchandise and lumber on a voyage from San Francisco, California, to Wales, Teller, and Unalaska in the Territory of Alaska, the 146-ton, 108-foot (32.9 m) schooner dragged her anchors in a gale and was stranded off Cape Prince of Wales, Alaska, becoming a total loss. Her crew of six survived and unloaded her cargo with the help of Alaska Natives.[1]

6 August

List of shipwrecks: 6 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Ella Francis  United States The schooner was sunk in a collision in thick fog with Nantucket ( United States) off Cape Cod. Four killed, one survivor rescued by Nantucket.[153]

7 August

List of shipwrecks: 7 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
City of Berlin  United States The steamer was sunk in a collision with Chili ( United States) at Detroit.[154]

8 August

List of shipwrecks: 8 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Elizabeth  United States While under tow by the steamer Irene ( United States) from Unalaska in the Aleutian Islands to St. Michael, Territory of Alaska, with a cargo of 190 tons of cargo including 40 tons of coal and 100 cords of wood, the 327-ton scow sank in the Bering Sea 270 nautical miles (500 km; 310 mi) north-northwest of Cape Cheerful (54°00′50″N 166°40′20″W) on Unalaska Island. Elizabeth′s only crewman was aboard Irene when Elizabeth sank.[155]
Ganda  Belgium The T Nolson & Co. 474-ton cargo ship was wrecked at Hell's Mouth, Llŷn Peninsula, Caernarfonshire. Ganda broke from her moorings, and one of her ropes tangled around her propeller, as her captain tried to get his ship away from the jetty. She drifted helplessly onto the rocky shore.[156]
Otagawa Maru  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War: The improvised gunboat was sunk by a mine near Port Arthur, Manchuria, China.[92]
Queen  United States The 12-gross register ton sternwheel paddle steamer was stranded on the Missouri River at Decatur, Nebraska. Both people on board survived.[157]

9 August

List of shipwrecks: 9 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Valleta  United States The steamer burned at dock at Long Island in the St. Lawrence River.[158]

11 August

List of shipwrecks: 11 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Burni  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: The Boiki-class destroyer ran aground in the Yellow Sea off Shantung, China. Her crew blew her up to prevent her capture by Japanese forces.[53][159]
Ryeshitelni  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: The Kretchet-class destroyer was blown up and abandoned by her crew at Chefoo, China, but did not sink. The Japanese captured her the next day, repaired her, and commissioned her as the destroyer Yamabiko ( Imperial Japanese Navy).[66][67]

13 August

List of shipwrecks: 13 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
HMS Decoy  Royal Navy The Daring-class destroyer was in collision with the destroyer HMS Arun ( Royal Navy) off the Isles of Scilly and sank. One crew member was lost.
Dunsinane  United Kingdom The ship, carrying granite, set sail at 7pm and ran into strong tides forcing it onto the Black Rock outside St Sampsons' harbour Guernsey. The next few days the planking was removed from the hull and the cargo removed into waiting carts.[160][161]
Recreation  United States The 25-foot (7.6 m) motorboat capsized on the Potomac River off the Georgetown section of Washington, D.C., drowning 10 of the 14 people on board.[162]

14 August

List of shipwrecks: 14 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Rurik  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War, Battle off Ulsan: The armored cruiser was scuttled to avoid capture after suffering heavy damage in action with the armored cruisers Iwate, Izumo, Tokiwa, and Azuma (all  Imperial Japanese Navy). Japanese ships rescued about 625 survivors.
Dunsinane  United Kingdom The barquentine, carrying a cargo of granite, set sail from Saint Sampson, Guernsey, in the Channel Islands at 7:00 p.m. and ran into strong tides which forcied her onto Black Rock outside the harbour. Over the next few days, the planking was removed from her hull and her cargo removed and transferred to waiting carts.[163][161]

16 August

List of shipwrecks: 16 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Elwood  United States The steamer burned at Avon, Washington.[164]

18 August

List of shipwrecks: 18 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Gremyashchi  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: Siege of Port Arthur: The armored gunvessel sank after striking a mine near Port Arthur, Manchuria, China.[107][165]

19 August

List of shipwrecks: 19 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Vigilant  United States The passenger steamer sprung a leak and sank off Barkers Landing, Delaware. Pumped out and towed to Philadelphia.[166]

20 August

List of shipwrecks: 20 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Novik  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: After the protected cruiser suffered serious damage from gunfire from the protected cruiser Tsushima ( Imperial Japanese Navy) during the Battle of Korsakov, her crew scuttled her in shallow water on a sandbank off Korsakov, Sakhalin Island, Russia. The protected cruiser Chitose ( Imperial Japanese Navy) entered the harbor on 21 August and further damaged the wreck with gunfire. The Japanese refloated her in 1906, repaired her, and commissioned her into service as the aviso Suzuya ( Imperial Japanese Navy).

21 August

List of shipwrecks: 21 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
No. 201  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: The torpedo boat was wrecked near Vladivostok, Russia.[167][107]

24 August

List of shipwrecks: 24 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Vuinoslivi  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The Forel-class destroyer was sunk by a mine off Port Arthur, China.[53][54]

25 August

List of shipwrecks: 25 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Mischief  United States The tug struck a hidden obstruction in New York Harbor off New York City, rolled to starboard, filled, and sank. She was raised the same day.[168]

28 August

List of shipwrecks: 28 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
A. J. Johnson  United States The steamer capsized at Wilmington, North Carolina, when the tide dropped with her railing hung up on the dock.[169]

31 August

List of shipwrecks: 31 August 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Lady Kindersley  Canada The motor schooner was crushed by ice in the Arctic Ocean off Point Barrow, Territory of Alaska. The schooner Boxer ( United States) rescued her crew.[48]

September

1 September

List of shipwrecks: 1 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Corunna  United Kingdom The barque ran aground at Miramar, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. She was refloated on 12 October 1904.[170]
Lily L  United States During a storm, the schooner was driven ashore and wrecked on the coast of the Russian Empire at East Cape on the Chukchi Peninsula in Siberia.[171]

2 September

List of shipwrecks: 2 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Laura M. Riggin  United States The 16-gross register ton motor vessel burned on the Nanticoke River in Delaware. Both people on board survived.[172]
Lewie  United States The 11-gross register ton schooner sank at Two Harbors, Minnesota. Both people on board survived.[173]

3 September

List of shipwrecks: 3 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Hayatori  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The destroyer struck an Imperial Russian Navy mine and sank with the loss of 17 lives in Korea Bay off Ping-tu-tao on the Liaotung Peninsula, Manchuria, China.[92][174]

4 September

List of shipwrecks: 4 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Annie B.  United States The steamer sank at dock in South Jacksonville, Florida. Probably raised.[175]
Sadie  United States During a voyage along the coast of the Territory of Alaska from Cape York to Kotzebue Sound and intermediate ports with 16 passengers, a crew of 22, and a cargo of 50 tons of general merchandise and coal on board, the 276-gross register ton, 150-foot (45.7 m) sidewheel paddle steamer struck a rock and settled on the bottom in 6 feet (1.8 m) of water in the Bering Sea near York City (65°30′N 167°41′W). The motor schooner Augusta C ( United States) took off some passengers on 4 September. The crew and remaining passengers abandoned ship and fled to shore when a gale struck on 6 September, and waves began to break over the ship continually on 7 September. The steamer Seddon ( United States) arrived on 9 September and departed with the remaining passengers on 10 September. No lives were lost, but salvage efforts failed and the ship became a total loss.[58]

5 September

List of shipwrecks: 5 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Mineola  United States The freighter struck an uncharted rock in the Sea of Okhotsk off the Tigil River. A total loss.[176]

9 September

List of shipwrecks: 9 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Longfellow  United States The steamer foundered off Cape Cod.[177]

10 September

List of shipwrecks: 10 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Lucia  United Kingdom Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: A news article dated 10 September reported that the 658-gross register ton sailing ship had been sunk by a mine at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China. Only one member of her crew survived.[178]
Vernie Mac  United States The steamer sank at the mouth of Eagle Lake in 17 feet (5.2 m) of water.[179]

11 September

List of shipwrecks: 11 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
City of Topeka  United States The steamer sank at dock at Seattle, Washington. Pumped out later.[180]

14 September

List of shipwrecks: 14 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Alaska  United States Hurricane of 14–15 September: The fishing steamer filled and sank at dock at Lewes, Delaware.[181]
Alden S. Swan  United States Hurricane of 14–15 September: The fishing steamer, at dock in Lewes, Delaware, broke loose and was driven ashore.[182]
Hannah A. Lennon  United States Hurricane of 14–15 September: The fishing steamer at dock at Cape Charles, Virginia, broke loose and was driven ashore, high and dry. Later pulled off the beach.[183]
I. W. Durham  United States Hurricane of 14–15 September: The tow steamer suffered superstructure damage, then filled and sank 1/2 mile off and below the Mouth of the Christiana River. 8 of 10 crewmen killed.[184]
Nathan Lawrence  United States Hurricane of 14–15 September: The schooner became waterlogged and was abandoned off Virginia.[185]
Osaka  United Kingdom The clipper ship was wrecked on 14 September 1904 on Kuril Islands on a voyage from Tsingtao to Nicolaieosk with general cargo.[186]
William H. Archer  United States The 95-gross register ton schooner sank during a voyage from Bangor, Maine, to Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts, with the loss of all four people aboard.[187]

15 September

List of shipwrecks: 15 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
D. K. Neal  United States The steamer struck a snag and sank, probably Norfolk, Virginia.[188]
Dependence  United States With no one on board, the 14-gross register ton motor vessel burned at Tampa, Florida.[187]
Georgie D. Loud  United States The 175-gross register ton schooner was abandoned in the Atlantic Ocean 50 nautical miles (93 km; 58 mi) northeast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. All five people on board survived.[189]
Joseph Church  United States The steamer dragged anchor in a gale and was wrecked on Peaked Hill bar, off Cape Cod, where she was broken up by the waves.[190]

18 September

List of shipwrecks: 18 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Heien  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The armored gunboat struck an Imperial Russian Navy mine and sank in five minutes with the loss of 196 lives off Reef Island in Pigeon Bay off the southwest end of the Liaotung Peninsula, Manchuria, China. Imperial Japanese Navy forces discovered four survivors on Reef Island on 19 September.[92][191]

22 September

List of shipwrecks: 22 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Vesta  United States The tug was in a collision with the steamer H. F. Dimock ( United States) in Boston Harbor off Boston, Massachusetts, and was beached to prevent her from sinking in deep water.[192]

25 September

List of shipwrecks: 25 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Noord  Netherlands The ship was wrecked southeast of Burhou, Alderney, Channel Islands.[193]

26 September

List of shipwrecks: 26 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
HMS Chamois  Royal Navy The Star-class destroyer lost a propeller blade at speed. The blade pierced the hull and the ship foundered in the Gulf of Patras without loss of life.
Osaka  United Kingdom Russo-Japanese War: Japanese forces found the 546-gross register ton sailing vessel stranded on Etorofu in the Kuril Islands and captured her. She had run aground during a voyage from Shanghai, China, to Vladivostok, Russia.[194]
Ruby  United States The steamer was sunk in a collision with Heck ( United States) in the St. Johns River a 1/4 mile south of the Mandarin Dock, Jacksonville, Florida.[195]

29 September

List of shipwrecks: 29 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Dewey  United States The steamer sank at dock over night at Norfolk, Virginia.[196]

30 September

List of shipwrecks: 30 September 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Adolphe  France The barquentine was driven into the wreck of Colonist and sank at Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. All 32 crew were rescued.

Unknown date

List of shipwrecks: September date 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Willard Mudgett  United States The bark sailed from Newport News, Virginia on 10 September to Bangor, Maine with a cargo of coal. It was last reported on 13 September from a location "30 miles east-southeast from Fenwicks Island".[197] Willard Mudgett perhaps "foundered in the heavy southeast gale that prevailed on September 13"[198] or was caught in the second hurricane of the 1904 season as it worked its way up the eastern coast. With a crew of ten men, Captain Fred Blanchard was in command of the ship at the time of its disappearance. His father, Captain William H. Blanchard, was a passenger.

October

1 October

List of shipwrecks: 1 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
No. 202  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: The torpedo boat was sunk in a collision near Vladivostok, Russia.[199]
Nellie  United States The tow steamer struck a submerged object one-half mile (0.80 km) below San Hickney and was beached. The hole was patched and the vessel was pulled off.[200]
Volunteer  United States The 23-gross register ton schooner was stranded in "Bdat" Harbor in Michigan. All three people on board survived.[201]

3 October

List of shipwrecks: 3 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Iron Chief  United States The steamer sprung a leak and sank in Saginaw Bay.[202]
Mayflower  United States The steamer burned and sank at dock at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.[203]

4 October

List of shipwrecks: 4 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Congress  United States The steamer burned at dock at South Manitou Island.[204]
Osprey  United States The ferry burned to the waterline at Billingsport, New Jersey.[205]
Ralph W.  United States The launch was sunk in a collision with a barge in the Christiana River.[206]
Rock Island  United States The steamer grounded on a shoal in the Yukon River seven miles (11 km) above Eagle City, Alaska. She backed off the shoal and sank with the bow in four feet (1.2 m) of water and the stern in six feet (1.8 m). Raised fairly soon after.[207]
Sitka  United States The steamer in haze and rain struck a rocky ledge off Point Au Sable in Lake Superior. The ship was beaten to pieces.[208]
West Side  United States The ferry burned to the waterline at Billingsport, New Jersey.[209]

5 October

List of shipwrecks: 5 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Hunter  United States The steamer caught fire at dock at Grand Marais, Michigan and burned to the waterline, a total loss.[210]
John W. Thomas  United States The steamer struck a log at Blue River Island and sank. Raised and repaired.[211]

8 October

List of shipwrecks: 8 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Cameroon  United Kingdom The Elder Dempster 1,862-gross register ton passenger-cargo ship was holed and beached on the coast of Liberia.[212]

10 October

List of shipwrecks: 10 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
F. A. Goebel  United States The steamer was sunk by a snag near Kenova, West Virginia. Raised and repaired.[213]

11 October

List of shipwrecks: 11 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Bob Dudley  United States The steamer struck a hidden obstruction near Smithland, Kentucky, and sank in six feet (1.8 m) of water. Raised and repaired.[214]

12 October

List of shipwrecks: 12 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
C. H. Bradley  United States The tug became a total loss at St. Michael, Territory of Alaska.[215]

16 October

List of shipwrecks: 16 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Georges Valentine  Italy The barque sank in a storm off Hutchinson Island, Florida, United States (27°11′55.8″N 80°09′49.8″W).
Seneca Chief  United States The steamer burned in Wilson Harbor on Lake Ontario.[216]

17 October

List of shipwrecks: 17 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Eloise  United States The steamer was sunk in a hurricane at Sanford, Florida.[217]
Junius S. Morgan  United States The steamer struck a hidden obstruction between Bird's Point, Missouri and Cairo, Illinois and sank in nine feet (2.7 m) of water. Total loss.[218]

22 October

List of shipwrecks: 22 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Crane  United Kingdom Russo-Japanese War, Dogger Bank incident: The steam fishing trawler was sunk by gunfire by ships of the Second Pacific Squadron of the Imperial Russian Navy near the Dogger Bank in the North Sea with the loss of her captain and first mate after the Russian warships mistook a fleet of British fishing trawlers from Kingston upon Hull for Imperial Japanese Navy torpedo boats during the early morning hours of darkness.[143]

23 October

List of shipwrecks: 23 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
L. J. Perry  United States Carrying a cargo of 21 tons of general merchandise and a crew of five, the 41-gross register ton, 77-foot (23.5 m) steam cargo vessel was blown onto the beach and wrecked during a gale in the harbor at Kayak (59°59′45″N 144°22′10″W) on Kayak Island off the south-central coast of the Territory of Alaska.[171]

24 October

List of shipwrecks: 24 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Seminole  United States The steamer sank at Clark's Dock, Jacksonville, Florida.[219]

25 October

List of shipwrecks: 25 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Zabiyaka  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The gunboat was sunk by Imperial Japanese Army artillery fire at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China.[199]

26 October

List of shipwrecks: 26 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Eliza H. Strong  United States The steamer burned in Lake Huron off Lexington, Michigan.[220]

27 October

List of shipwrecks: 27 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Doctor York  United States The steamer burned to the waterline at Kenova, West Virginia.[221]
Mainlander  United States The steamer was sunk in a collision with tug Sea Lion ( United States) near West Point in Puget Sound in dense fog.[222]
Sibilla  United States The steamer struck a snag and sank 5 miles above the Mouth of Bayou Grosse Tete in 6 feet of water. Probably raised.[223]

28 October

List of shipwrecks: 28 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Skagit Queen  United States The steamer was loading cargo from the river bank near Fir, Washington, when she was caught on a snag tilting her till she filled and sank. Later raised and was undamaged.[224]

29 October

List of shipwrecks: 29 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Bart E. Linehan  United States The steamer sank at City dock, Louisville, Kentucky when her seams opened up. Later raised.[225]

30 October

List of shipwrecks: 30 October 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Angara  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The auxiliary cruiser was sunk by Imperial Japanese Army field guns at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China.[226]

November

2 November

List of shipwrecks: 2 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Bruce  United States The steamer caught fire in the engine room at dock at Escanaba, Michigan and burned to the waterline.[227]

4 November

List of shipwrecks: 4 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Columbia  United States The ferry collided with the steamer City of Lowell ( United States) in dense fog on the East River in New York City, pushing her toward the Brooklyn shore, where she sank. She was raised and repaired.[228]

6 November

List of shipwrecks: 6 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Atago  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The Maya-class gunboat was wrecked on the coast of the Liaotung Peninsula near Port Arthur, Manchuria, China.[229]
Panther  United States The laid-up pleasure steamer was destroyed at Provuncher's Shipyard in East Providence, Rhode Island, by a fire that spread from a nearby building.[230]

7 November

List of shipwrecks: 7 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Challenger  United States The schooner caught fire off Willapa, Washington and put into port, but was a total loss.[231]

10 November

List of shipwrecks: 10 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
George T. Hope  United States The steamer sprung a leak and sank at dock at Escanaba, Michigan. Raised, temporarily repaired and taken to Cleveland, Ohio for repairs.[232]
Wm. Armstrong  United States The railroad ferry attempted to leave dock in Ogdensburg, New York with two insecure loaded rail cars. One of them broke loose and rolled where it was dangling off the stern causing the ferry to begin filling with water. She was run onto the bar and sank in 14 feet (4.3 m) of water. Raised and repaired.[233]

11 November

List of shipwrecks: 11 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
John Denessen  United States The steamer struck a log near the Red River near Green Bay, Wisconsin. She was beached in the Red River and was patched and refloated.[234]

12 November

List of shipwrecks: 12 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Fanny H  United States The pleasure yacht burned at St. Martin Island.[235]
Wyoming  United States The steamer sprang a leak and sank in Lake Huron eight miles (13 km) east of Burnt Cabin Point.[236]

13 November

List of shipwrecks: 13 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
C. T. No. 5  United States The 177-gross register ton barge sank in Long Island Sound. The only person on board survived.[237]
John Gregory  United States The tug foundered in a gale and heavy seas in Lake Erie just off the breakwater at Cleveland, Ohio. The harbor pilot was killed.[238]
Missouri  United States The 15-gross register ton schooner sank in Pamlico Sound on the coast of North Carolina with the loss of all three people on board.[28]
Stroini  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The Kretchet-class destroyer struck an Imperial Russian Navy mine and sank in Korea Bay off Port Arthur, China.[66][67][239]

14 November

List of shipwrecks: 14 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Penllyn  United States The tow steamer, laid up since a collision on 31 October, sank at dock at Philadelphia, possibly her stern was caught under the dock with a rise in water level.[240]

15 November

List of shipwrecks: 15 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Helen Barton  United States The tug was sunk while tied up at the Ascension Coal Fleet Dock in Donaldsonville, Louisiana, when a coal boat struck her. She was a total loss.[241]
Kitty Horr  United States The 17-gross register ton schooner was stranded at Marco, Florida. The only person on board survived.[173]

16 November

List of shipwrecks: 16 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Hunter Savidge  United States The steamer burned at dock at Manistee, Michigan.[242]
Rastoropni  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: After her crew was put ashore, the Puiliki-class destroyer was blown up by her commanding officer at Chefoo, China, apparently to avoid any possibility of Imperial Japanese Navy forces entering the harbor and capturing her.[66][67][243][244]
Ten Broeck  United States The steamer burned at Cairo, Illinois.[245]
Vidia M. Brigham  United States The schooner was sunk in a collision with Walter A. Luckenbach ( United States) six miles (9.7 km) off Cape Elizabeth, Maine. One crewman lost.[246]

17 November

List of shipwrecks: 17 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Uncle Sam  United States The laid up steamer burned at St. Louis, Missouri.[247]

18 November

List of shipwrecks: 18 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Mohawk  United States The freighter burned off the Cornfield Lightship in Long Island Sound. One crewman killed. Survivors rescued by Boston ( United States).[248]

19 November

List of shipwrecks: 19 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Philip Minch  United States The steamer burned in Lake Erie near Marblehead, Ohio.[249]

21 November

List of shipwrecks: 21 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
J. N. Harbin  United States The steamer struck a snag and sank at Bickers Landing.[250]

22 November

List of shipwrecks: 22 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Marie  United States The tug sank at dock overnight in the East Boston neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. Later raised.[251]

23 November

List of shipwrecks: 23 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
City of Seattle  United States The steamer struck an uncharted rock in Eagle River Harbor and was beached. Repaired quickly and proceeded on its way.[252]
Joe Seay  United States The tug capsized and sank near Vicksburg, Mississippi. Total loss. One crewman killed.[253]

24 November

List of shipwrecks: 24 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Kongo  United States The steamer struck an obstruction leaving dock at Au Sable, twisting her stern post, she filled and sank.[254]
Massasoit  United States The 842-gross register ton schooner barge or scow barge was stranded at Waterworks Crib on the Niagara River in New York. All six people aboard survived.[34]
Wm. Henry  United States The 52-gross register ton schooner was stranded at Old Point, Virginia. All three people aboard survived.[187]

26 November

List of shipwrecks: 26 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Marie  United States The launch was sunk in a collision with the steamer P. R. R. No. 32 ( United States) in the East River in New York City.[255]

28 November

List of shipwrecks: 28 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Kelsey  United States The 203-gross register ton barge sank at New York City. The only person on board survived.[237]
Thos. White  United States The steamer burned in the Calumet River due to a lamp exploding in her engine room. She was a total loss.[256]

29 November

List of shipwrecks: 29 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
B. W. Blanchard  United States The steamer ran aground and was wrecked in a blinding snowstorm on North Point in Lake Huron and broke up.[257][258]
John T. Johnson  United States The schooner barge ran aground and was wrecked in a blinding snowstorm on North Point in Lake Huron and broke up.[259]
Minnie  United States The laid up steamer burned to the waterline at Thornley's Landing, West Virginia and sank.[260]

30 November

List of shipwrecks: 30 November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Columbia  United States The 41-ton, 60-foot (18.3 m) schooner was driven ashore in "McLeods Bay" – probably a reference to McLeod Harbor (59°53′N 147°15′W) – on the coast of Montague Island on the south-central coast of the Territory of Alaska. Her crew of four survived, but she was a total loss.[215]
Saien  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The protected cruiser struck a mine and sank in three minutes with the loss of 38 lives in the Gulf of Pechili between Pigeon Bay and Louisa Bay at 38°51′N 121°05′E, 1 nautical mile (1.9 km; 1.2 mi) off the coast of the Liaotung Peninsula, Manchuria, China.[261]

Unknown date

List of shipwrecks: Unknown date in November 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Rex  United States With no one on board, the 18-gross register ton scow was stranded at Bellingham, Washington.[237]
Slieve Bawn  United Kingdom The full-rigged ship was wrecked at Baira Rio Contas, Chile.[262]

December

2 December

List of shipwrecks: 2 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Dixie  United States The steamer struck a hidden obstruction and sank 3 miles below Fort Adams, Mississippi.[263]

3 December

List of shipwrecks: 3 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Santiago  United States The 1,918-gross register ton schooner barge or scow barge was lost when she collided with the screw steamer Philadelphia ( United States) off the Delaware Breakwater north of Cape Henlopen, Delaware. All four people aboard survived.[34]

4 December

List of shipwrecks: 4 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Gustavo  United States The 12-gross register ton sloop sank at Salinas, Puerto Rico. Both people on board survived.[173]

5 December

List of shipwrecks: 5 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Poltava  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The battleship was set afire by five hits from Imperial Japanese Army artillery and sank in shallow water at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, after the magazine for her 12-inch (305 mm) guns exploded, blowing a hole in her bottom. The Japanese refloated and repaired her and put into service as Tango ( Imperial Japanese Navy).

6 December

List of shipwrecks: 6 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Retvizan  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The battleship was sunk in shallow water at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, by Imperial Japanese Army artillery fire. The Japanese refloated and repaired her and put into service as Hizen ( Imperial Japanese Navy).

7 December

List of shipwrecks: 7 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Pearl  United States The 87-gross register ton, 95.5-foot (29.1 m) schooner departed San Francisco, California, bound for Sanak Island in the Sanak Islands subgroup of the Fox Islands group of the Aleutian Islands with 28 fisherman and a crew of eight aboard and was never heard from again. Many months later, the schooner John F. Miller ( United States) found evidence of her wreck on a reef northeast of Caton Island (54°23′30″N 162°25′30″W) in the Sanak Islands.[264][265]
Peresvet  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: After suffering damage from Imperial Japanese Army artillery fire over the course of several weeks, the Peresvet-class battleship was scuttled in shallow water at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China. The Japanese refloated and repaired her and put into service as Sagami ( Imperial Japanese Navy).
Pobeda  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War Siege of Port Arthur: The Peresvet-class battleship was sunk in shallow water at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, by Imperial Japanese Navy artillery fire. The Japanese refloated and repaired her and put into service as Suwo ( Imperial Japanese Navy).

8 December

List of shipwrecks: 8 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Gilyak  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The gunboat was sunk at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, by Imperial Japanese Army artillery fire.[199]
Pallada  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War Siege of Port Arthur: The Pallada-class protected cruiser was sunk in shallow water at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, by Imperial Japanese Army artillery fire. The Japanese refloated and repaired her and put into service as Tsugaru ( Imperial Japanese Navy).

9 December

List of shipwrecks: 9 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Bayan  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The Bayan-class armored cruiser was sunk at her moorings at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, by Imperial Japanese Army artillery fire. The Japanese refloated and repaired her and put into service as Aso ( Imperial Japanese Navy).

10 December

List of shipwrecks: 10 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Antverpia  Belgium The G Albrecht cargo ship ran aground on the River Scheldt. She was refloated in 1905 and scrapped in Antwerp.[85]

11 December

List of shipwrecks: 11 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Jessie  United States While she was under tow in the waters of the Territory of Alaska from Ketchikan to Niblack with a cargo of 60 tons of lumber and shingles, the 44-ton scow′s towline parted and she drifted ashore on the coast of Prince of Wales Island in the Alexander Archipelago in Southeast Alaska somewhere near Chasina Point (56°16′50″N 132°01′30″W), 2 nautical miles (3.7 km; 2.3 mi) north of Wedge Island (55.1472222°N 131.9647222°W / 55.1472222; -131.9647222 (Wedge Island)). She broke up on the rocks.[266]

12 December

List of shipwrecks: 12 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Continental  United States The steamer was wrecked one mile (1.6 km) north of Twin River Point Light.[267]
Flora  United States The tug struck a sand bar at Kellogg's Landing, capsized and sank in ten feet (3.0 m) of water.[268]

13 December

List of shipwrecks: 13 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Takasago  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The protected cruiser struck a mine and sank at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China (38°10′N 121°15′E). A total of 273 crew were killed.

14 December

List of shipwrecks: 14 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
John Dexter  United States The 24-gross register ton schooner was stranded in East Bay on the Pembroke River in Maine. All four people on board survived.[269]
No. 53  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The torpedo boat was sunk off Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, during an attack on the battleship Sevastopol ( Imperial Russian Navy).[92]

15 December

List of shipwrecks: 15 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Baker  United States The coal barge sprang a leak and sank at Pier 2, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[270]
No. 42  Imperial Japanese Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The torpedo boat was sunk off Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, during an attack on the battleship Sevastopol ( Imperial Russian Navy).[92]
Vsadnik  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The torpedo gunboat was sunk at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, by Imperial Japanese Army artillery fire. The Japanese refloated and repaired her and commissioned her into service as Makikumo ( Imperial Japanese Navy).[199][271]

16 December

List of shipwrecks: 16 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Glen Island  United States The steamer burned east of Execution Light in Long Island Sound. Two passengers and seven crew killed.[272]
Storozhevoi  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The Kretchet-class destroyer was torpedoed by an Imperial Japanese Navy torpedo boat at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China, and beached.[66][67]

18 December

List of shipwrecks: 18 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Amur  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War: Siege of Port Arthur: The minelayer was sunk by Imperial Japanese Army 11-inch (279 mm) howitzers while drydocked at Port Arthur, Manchuria, China.[273][274]
Laura  United States The tow steamer sank at dock at Pier 63, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, when her guard was caught under the dock during a rise in the water level.[275]

19 December

List of shipwrecks: 19 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Lime Rock  United States The cargo ship sank in the East River while tied up at Pier 3 after being damaged by ice drifting in from South Amboy, New Jersey.[276]

22 December

List of shipwrecks: 22 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Robert E. Lee  United States The steamer struck a stump and sank between Memphis, Tennessee and Ashport, Tennessee .[277]

25 December

List of shipwrecks: 25 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Rees Pritchard  United States The steamer burned at dock at Yazoo City, Mississippi. Total loss.[278]

26 December

List of shipwrecks: 26 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Bobr  Imperial Russian Navy Russo-Japanese War, Siege of Port Arthur: The Sivuch-class gunboat, already badly damaged by Imperial Japanese Army artillery and then stripped and demolished by her crew, was sunk by additional hits by Japanese artillery.[151][279]

27 December

List of shipwrecks: 27 December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Lesnoy  United States The 8-gross register ton, 35-foot (10.7 m) schooner was wrecked during a gale on the northwest end of Wosnesenski Island in the Shumagin Islands off the south coast of the Alaska Peninsula.[171]
Northeastern  United States The steamer was wrecked and broke up on shoals near Cape Hatteras due to navigation errors during a gale with rain and high seas.[280]
Two Brothers  United States The 10-gross register ton schooner was lost when she collided with the screw steamer Cambridge ( United States) in the Chesapeake Bay off Claiborne, Maryland. All five people on board survived.[201][281]

Unknown date

List of shipwrecks: Unknown date December 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Alice M  United States During a voyage in the waters of the Territory of Alaska from Juneau to Kayak Island with a cargo of 11 tons of merchandise, the 13-ton schooner was wrecked during a gale on a sandbar behind "Kanuck Island" – probably a reference to Kanak Island (60°08′N 144°21′W) in Controller Bay (60.0770°N 144.2178°W / 60.0770; -144.2178 (Controller Bay)) – on the coast of Southcentral Alaska. All six people aboard – three passengers and three crewmen – abandoned ship and survived, but Alice M soon was refloated by the rising tide, drifted out to sea, and sank.[282]

Unknown date

List of shipwrecks: Unknown date in 1904
ShipCountryDescription
Anna Evans  United States The 6-gross register ton schooner sank in Mobjack Bay on the coast of Virginia. All three people on board survived.[283]
Conemaugh  Belgium The steamer disappeared after leaving Coronel, Chile, bound for Sainta Lucia in the West Indies.[284]
Maharaja  Hong Kong The cargo ship was wrecked.[285]
Maid of Patuca  United States With no one on board, the 84-gross register ton screw steamer was lost in Honduras. Sources disagree on whether she sank in the Patuca River on 13 September[286] or was blown out to sea by a hurricane on 1 October and dashed to pieces on a bar offshore.[287]
Norseman  United States The 7-gross register ton sloop was stranded at South Orrington, Maine. The only person on board survived.[28]

References

  1. alaskashipwreck.com Alaska Shipwrecks (V)
  2. YvesDufiel (2008), Dictionnaire des naufrages dans la Manche
  3. "Annual report of the Supervising Inspector-general Steamboat-inspection Service, Year ending June 30, 1905". Harvard University. Retrieved 7 August 2019.
  4. "Annual report of the Supervising Inspector-general Steamboat-inspection Service, Year ending June 30, 1905". Harvard University. Retrieved 9 August 2019.
  5. "Annual report of the Supervising Inspector-general Steamboat-inspection Service, Year ending June 30, 1905". Harvard University. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  6. "Annual report of the Supervising Inspector-general Steamboat-inspection Service, Year ending June 30, 1905". Harvard University. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  7. "Annual report of the Supervising Inspector-general Steamboat-inspection Service, Year ending June 30, 1905". Harvard University. Retrieved 10 August 2019.
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Ship events in 1904
Ship launches: 1899 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909
Ship commissionings: 1899 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909
Ship decommissionings: 1899 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909
Shipwrecks: 1899 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909

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