List of public art in Mayfair

This is a list of public art in Mayfair, a district in the City of Westminster, London.

Mayfair is a residential and commercial area dominated by terraces of town houses.[1] In Grosvenor Square there are several memorials with an American theme, including a memorial garden commemorating the September 11 attacks, due to the former presence on that square of the US Embassy.[2] At the southern end of the district, the courtyard of Burlington House (home of the Royal Academy) on Piccadilly is frequently used as a temporary exhibition space for artworks.[3]

Image Title / subject Location and
coordinates
DateArtist / designerArchitect / other Type Designation Notes
Bust of Sekhmet Sotheby's, 34–35 New Bond Street 1320 BC c.1320 BC Bust [4]

More images
Statue of William Pitt the Younger Hanover Square

51°30′49″N 0°08′37″W
1831Francis Leggatt ChantreyN/A Statue Grade II Unveiled 22 August 1831; there was an attempt by reformist opponents of Pitt to pull the statue down on the morning of the unveiling. Concerns for the work's security might have been the reason for the unusually tall plinth.[5]

More images
Fountain Nymph Berkeley Square

51.509116°N 0.145293°W / 51.509116; -0.145293
1867Alexander MunroN/A Fountain with sculpture Grade II The pedestal inscribed THE GIFT/ OF/ HENRY 3RD MARQUIS OF LANSDOWNE. This Fountain Nymph was Munro's second treatment of the theme after that for the memorial to Herbert Ingram in Boston, Lincolnshire (1862–1863). He also produced a smaller marble version of the Berkeley Square Nymph, which was installed in a public garden in Oxford in around 1970.[6]
Drinking fountain Mount Street Gardens

51°30′35″N 0°08′57″W
1892N/AErnest George Fountain with sculpture Grade II Inscribed THIS FOUNTAIN WAS ERECTED BY HENRY LOFTS IN/ RECOGNITION OF MANY HAPPY YEARS IN MOUNT STREET/ SIR ERNEST GEORGE. RA FECIT 1892. Lofts was an estate agent, and George an architect, to the Grosvenor estate. Lofts's office was in Mount Street, which was partly rebuilt by his firm with George as architect.[7]
Painting Colnaghi, 144–146 New Bond Street 1911Henry PooleLanchester & Rickards Architectural sculpture [8]

More images
Statue of Joshua Reynolds Burlington House

51°30′32″N 0°08′22″W
1931Alfred DruryGiles Gilbert Scott Statue Grade II Unveiled 12 December 1931.[9] Drury was awarded the commission in 1917, but was too preoccupied with war memorials in the following years to proceed with the work. In 1926 he had to start over with a new composition after his studio assistant failed to keep the first clay figure moist every night, which had led to its disintegration.[10]

More images
Statue of Franklin D. Roosevelt Grosvenor Square

51°30′42″N 0°09′06″W
1948William Reid DickB. W. L. Gallannaugh; Mary Jenks (lettering) Statue Grade II Unveiled 12 April 1948 by Eleanor Roosevelt. The standing pose is intended to recall one of the moments when Roosevelt took the oath of office; he usually used a wheelchair due to his paralytic illness. Winston Churchill, who first proposed the statue, had hoped for a seated portrayal of the President as a pendant to the statue of Abraham Lincoln on Parliament Square.[11]
Time–Life Screen New Bond Street 1952–53Henry MooreMichael Rosenauer Architectural sculpture Grade II* [12]
Eagle 24 Grosvenor Square (the former US Embassy) 1960Theodore RoszakEero Saarinen Architectural sculpture Grade II [13]
Crouching Figure No. 4 Carlos Place

51°30′36″N 0°08′57″W
1973Emilio GrecoLuca Clavarino (1987 setting) Sculpture N/A Unveiled 20 November 1987.[14]

More images
Horse and Rider Corner of New Bond Street and Burlington Gardens 1974–75Elisabeth FrinkN/A Equestrian statue Grade II Frink's catalogue raisonné notes that these figures personify "the most desirable masculine qualities", namely "speed, resilience, intelligence, loyalty, affection, courage, sensitivity, beauty and free sensuality". Another cast was erected in Winchester High Street in 1983. Previously situated on Dover Street near the junction with Piccadilly,[15] the work was moved to its current location in 2018 to mark the opening of the Royal Academy's new entrance at 6 Burlington Gardens.[16]

More images
Statue of Dwight D. Eisenhower Grosvenor Square

51°30′42″N 0°09′10″W
1969Robert DeanMayell Hart and Associates Statue N/A Unveiled 23 January 1989. A gift from the people of Kansas City, Missouri. Other casts of this statue are at West Point Military Academy and Eisenhower's burial place in Abilene, Kansas.[17]
Hat box motifs Bond Street tube station Jubilee line platforms 1979Tom EckersleyN/A Tile motifs N/A [18]

More images
RAF Eagle Squadrons Memorial Grosvenor Square

51°30′40″N 0°09′04″W
1986Elisabeth FrinkT. A. Kempster Memorial with sculpture Grade II Unveiled 12 May 1986.[19]
Ducking Pond Row Fountain Hanover Square

51°30′50″N 0°08′38″W
1988Paul CooperN/A Fountain with sculpture N/A Originally erected in Bond Street.[20]
Taichi Spin Kick St Andrew's Building, 17 Old Park Lane

51°30′17″N 0°09′00″W
1991Ju MingN/A Sculpture N/A [21]


More images
Allies

Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt

New Bond Street

51°30′38″N 0°08′33″W
1995Lawrence HolofcenerN/A Sculptural group N/A Unveiled 2 May 1995, shortly before the 50th anniversary of VE Day, by Princess Margaret. The sculptor's wife gifted the group to the nation, but the Royal Fine Art Commission ruled out a location in a central London park. The Bond Street Association then expressed an interest in the work.[22]
Helix 1–4 Curzon Street 1998Eilìs O'Connell Architectural sculpture N/A [23]
London Lancashire Court, on the approach to the Handel House Museum

51°30′47″N 0°08′45″W
2001Michael Czerwiǹski (with Ray Howell)N/A Tile mural N/A Scenes of the city in ancient and modern times, hand-painted and in relief.[24]
Inscriptions 21 Davies Street 2003–2005 c.2003–2005Ian Hamilton FinlayKohn Pederson Fox Inscriptions N/A Quotations from the French revolutionary Louis Antoine de Saint-Just are inscribed on the terracotta façade: "Too many laws, too few examples" and "Les Mots Juste et Injuste Sont Entendus Par Toutes Les Consciences"[25][26]
Verge 23 Savile Row 2003–2008Joel ShapiroEric Parry Architectural sculpture [27]
Salmon Leap Outside 40 Berkeley Square

51°30′35″N 0°08′49″W
2004Michael CooperN/A Sculpture N/A Refers to the Tyburn which once ran nearby.[28]
Granite Sculptures Curzon Square

51°30′22″N 0°09′03″W
2004John AikenRolfe Judd Sculptures N/A The bench-like sculptures are formed from black granite from Zimbabwe and silver-grey granite from Portugal spliced together.[29]
Untitled Princes Street

51°30′52″N 0°08′34″W
2004Alexander BeleschenkoN/A Glass panels on building N/A [30]
Entrance Sculpture 1 Hanover Street 2005Bruce McLeanSheppard Robson Architectural sculpture [31]
Aspiration In front of Leconfield House, Curzon Street

51°30′23″N 0°08′59″W
2006John BrownN/A Sculpture N/A [32]
New Burlington Flare New Burlington Place

51°30′45″N 0°08′26″W
2006Michael BleyenbergN/A Light installation N/A [33]
The Prophecy of Teiresias Richard Green Gallery, 33 New Bond Street 2011Alexander StoddartGeorge Saumarez Smith of ADAM Architecture Bas-reliefs N/A The three reliefs, representing scenes from the Odyssey, are an allegory of "the extreme lengths modern art has taken to distance itself from its origin in Greece".[34]
Silence

Simon Milton

Mount Street / Carlos Place

51°30′37″N 0°08′57″W
2011N/ATadao Ando et al. Water feature N/A A raised granite-edged pool into which two trees are set, and which emits clouds of water vapour for fifteen seconds every fifteen minutes.[35] Jointly commissioned by the Grosvenor Estate and the Connaught Hotel; Blair Associates Architects and the Building Design Partnership were also involved the project.[36]

More images
Shop 'Til You Drop Bruton Lane

51°30′38″N 0°08′37″W
2011BanksyN/A Graffiti N/A [37]

More images
Statue of Ronald Reagan Grosvenor Square

51°30′39″N 0°09′09″W
2011Chas FaganN/A Statue N/A Unveiled 4 July 2011. Westminster City Council's rule that a person may only be commemorated by a statue 10 years after their death was waived so that Margaret Thatcher could perform the unveiling,[38] but she proved too unwell to attend the ceremony. A fragment of the Berlin Wall is incorporated into the pedestal.[39]
Timelines Wilder Walk

51°30′38″N 0°08′08″W
2011Daniela SchönbächlerDixon Jones Architects Light installation N/A [40]

More images
Terza Rima 9–15 Sackville Street

51°30′34″N 0°08′18″W
2011–12Rebecca SalterJM Architects Designs screenprinted onto windows and a bronze panel N/A [41]
Three Figures Bourdon Place 2012Neal FrenchN/A Statues N/A Unveiled by Twiggy, one of the work's subjects, on 31 May 2012.[42] A plaque nearby provides the following exegesis: A passing shopper stumbles upon/ Terence Donovan photographing the model Twiggy/ near to his studio in 1960s Mayfair.[43]
Portcullis Gates 33 Davies Street

51°30′43″N 0°08′53″W
2013Wendy RamshawHOK Gates N/A 3.6 metres (12 ft)-high bronze gates with abstract patterns of "flowing lines and intersecting arcs ... reflecting the life and style of Mayfair", which can be lowered at night in the manner of a portcullis.[44][45][46]
An Age, An Instant New Burlington Mews 2014Rona SmithN/A Gate N/A Unveiled 29 April 2014. The artist took her inspiration from turn-of-the-century pocket watches, as this locale was a centre for the watchmaking trade in the early 20th century when the building's façade was rebuilt.[47]
ROOM Beaumont Hotel, Brown Hart Gardens 2014Antony Gormley Sculpture N/A [48]
Science 70–71 New Bond Street Thomas Rudge Architectural sculpture [8]
Commerce 70–71 New Bond Street Louis Frederick Roslyn Architectural sculpture [8]
Art 70–71 New Bond Street Louis Frederick Roslyn Architectural sculpture [8]
Elephant Aspinall's, Curzon Street

51°30′23″N 0°08′58″W
??N/A Statue N/A The gambling club's founder, John Aspinall, was a noted wildlife enthusiast whose two animal parks in Kent, Howletts and Port Lympne, are funded by the club's proceeds.[49]

Burlington House

Image Title / subject Location and
coordinates
DateArtist / designerArchitect / other Type Designation Notes
Michelangelo Burlington House 1870sWilliam Calder Marshall
Titian Burlington House 1870sWilliam Calder Marshall
Phidias Burlington House 1870sJoseph Durham
William of Wykeham Burlington House 1870sJoseph Durham
John Flaxman Burlington House 1870sHenry Weekes
Raphael Burlington House 1870sHenry Weekes
Leonardo da Vinci Burlington House 1870sEdward Bowring Stephens
Joshua Reynolds Burlington House 1870sEdward Bowring Stephens
Christopher Wren Burlington House 1870sEdward Bowring Stephens

6 Burlington Gardens

6 Burlington Gardens, a Grade II*-listed building now used by the Royal Academy, was designed by James Pennethorne in 1866–67 for the University of London. In 1868 the university's Senate proposed the subjects of the 22 statues for the façade: Isaac Newton to represent Science, Jeremy Bentham for Law, John Milton for the Arts and William Harvey for Medicine; Galen, Cicero, Aristotle, Plato, Archimedes and Tribonian (replaced in the final scheme by Justinian) as representatives of "ancient culture", and the "illustrious foreigners" Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Georges Cuvier, Carl Linnaeus, Galileo Galilei, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Pierre-Simon Laplace. Finally, Adam Smith, John Locke, Francis Bacon, John Hunter, William Shakespeare (replaced by David Hume) and John Dalton (replaced by Humphry Davy) were included as "English worthies", although Smith, Hunter and Hume were Scottish. Shakespeare was substituted as his achievement was felt to be "independent of academic influence"; instead he was commemorated with a statue apart, inside the building.[50]

Image Title / subject Location and
coordinates
DateArtist / designerArchitect / other Type Designation Notes
Statue of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz First storey 1870sPatrick MacDowellJames Pennethorne Statue in niche [50]
Statue of Georges Cuvier First storey 1870sPatrick MacDowellJames Pennethorne Statue in niche [50]
Statue of Carl Linnaeus First storey 1870sPatrick MacDowellJames Pennethorne Statue in niche [50]
Statue of Adam Smith First storey 1870sWilliam TheedJames Pennethorne Statue in niche [50]
Statue of John Locke First storey 1870sWilliam TheedJames Pennethorne Statue in niche [50]
Statue of Francis Bacon First storey 1870sWilliam TheedJames Pennethorne Statue in niche [50]
Statue of Isaac Newton Above the portico 1870sJoseph DurhamJames Pennethorne Seated statue [50]
Statue of Jeremy Bentham Above the portico 1870sJoseph DurhamJames Pennethorne Seated statue [50]
Statue of John Milton Above the portico 1870sJoseph DurhamJames Pennethorne Seated statue [50]
Statue of William Harvey Above the portico 1870sJoseph DurhamJames Pennethorne Seated statue [50]
Statue of Galileo Galilei Eastern balustrade 1870sEdward William WyonJames Pennethorne Statue [50]
Statue of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Eastern balustrade 1870sEdward William WyonJames Pennethorne Statue [50]
Statue of Pierre-Simon Laplace Eastern balustrade 1870sEdward William WyonJames Pennethorne Statue [50]
Statue of Galen Central balustrade 1870sJames Sherwood WestmacottJames Pennethorne Statue [50]
Statue of Cicero Central balustrade 1870sJames Sherwood WestmacottJames Pennethorne Statue [50]
Statue of Aristotle Central balustrade 1870sJames Sherwood WestmacottJames Pennethorne Statue [50]
Statue of Plato Central balustrade 1870sWilliam F. WoodingtonJames Pennethorne Statue [50]
Statue of Archimedes Central balustrade 1870sWilliam F. WoodingtonJames Pennethorne Statue [50]
Sattue of Justinian I Central balustrade 1870sWilliam F. WoodingtonJames Pennethorne Statue [50]
Satteu of John Hunter Western balustrade 1870sMatthew NobleJames Pennethorne Statue [50]
Statue of David Hume Western balustrade 1870sMatthew NobleJames Pennethorne Statue [50]
Statue of Humphry Davy Western balustrade 1870sMatthew NobleJames Pennethorne Statue [50]

References

  1. Mayfair Conservation Area Mini Guide (PDF), Westminster City Council, Department of Planning and City Development, May 2004, retrieved 27 July 2014
  2. "Grosvenor Square Garden", London Gardens Online, London Parks & Gardens Trust, retrieved 27 July 2014
  3. "Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House Courtyard Landscape", Landscape Architects Pages, 21 February 2014, retrieved 6 September 2014
  4. "Bond Street", Secret London, retrieved 23 August 2013
  5. Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 60–1
  6. Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 7–8
  7. Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 239–40
  8. Speel, Bob, A sculpture walk in Piccadilly and Bond Street, retrieved 11 April 2013
  9. Ward-Jackson 2011, p. 14
  10. Blackwood 1989, p. 140
  11. Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 54–6
  12. Henry Moore – Works in Public – Time-Life Screen 1952–53 (LH 344) Accessed 19 August 2010
  13. Chronology Accessed 19 August 2010
  14. Ward-Jackson 2011, p. 18
  15. Ward-Jackson 2011, p. 222
  16. Horse & Rider by Dame Elisabeth Frink unveiled on Bond Street, New West End Company, 28 June 2018, retrieved 11 July 2018
  17. Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 58–9
  18. Tile Gazetteer—London, Tiles & Architectural Ceramics Society, retrieved 1 March 2013
  19. Ward-Jackson 2011, p. 57
  20. Ward-Jackson 2011, p. 62
  21. Ward-Jackson 2011, p. 185
  22. Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 9–10
  23. Ward-Jackson 2011, p. 38.
  24. Pearson, Lynn; Dennis, Richard (2005), Tile GazetteerWestminster, Tiles & Architectural Ceramics Society, retrieved 17 August 2014
  25. Wevill, John (29 May 2018), "Public art needs meaning", RIBA Journal, Royal Institute of British Architects, retrieved 9 July 2018
  26. 21 Davies Street, PLP Architecture, retrieved 9 July 2018
  27. Ward-Jackson 2011, p. 249.
  28. Ward-Jackson 2011, pp. 8–9
  29. Ward-Jackson 2011, p. 38
  30. Delight: Celebrating ten years of public art on Regent Street (PDF), The Crown Estate, p. 14, retrieved 22 September 2014
  31. Ward-Jackson 2011, p. 62.
  32. Ward-Jackson 2011, p. 39
  33. New Burlington Place, Plan Projects, archived from the original on 26 February 2011, retrieved 11 August 2014
  34. Partridge, Chris (17 July 2011), "33 New Bond Street W1", Ornamental Passions, retrieved 14 August 2018
  35. "Silence by Tadao Ando and Blair Associates", Dezeen, 14 July 2011, retrieved 28 June 2013
  36. Fulcher, Merlin (6 July 2011), "Tadao Ando completes 'Silence' fountain in Mayfair", The Architects' Journal, retrieved 16 April 2012
  37. "Revealed: Banksy's Method for 'Shop 'Til You Drop'", ForeignStudents.com, 28 November 2011, retrieved 19 July 2014
  38. Ward-Jackson 2011, p. 60
  39. "Ronald Reagan statue unveiled at US Embassy in London", BBC News, 4 July 2011, retrieved 13 June 2012
  40. "The Quadrant Timelines", Modus Operandi, retrieved 11 August 2014
  41. Sackville Street, Modus Operandi, retrieved 17 August 2014
  42. "Twiggy", Neal French Figurative Sculpture, retrieved 23 April 2016
  43. "Day 17 – Mayfair – Bond Street – Berkeley Square", everystreetinlondon, 1 February 2016, retrieved 23 April 2016
  44. Franck Namani to open flagship store at 33 Davies Street, Grosvenor, 29 November 2013, retrieved 14 August 2014
  45. "Portcullis Gates, Wendy Ramshaw", The Sculpture Factory, retrieved 14 August 2014
  46. 33 Davies Street, HOK, retrieved 14 August 2014
  47. "A Place for Art", Regent Street, The Crown Estate, retrieved 11 August 2014
  48. Howarth, Dan (11 June 2014), "Antony Gormley creates a giant metal sculpture you can sleep in", Dezeen, retrieved 12 July 2018
  49. Peter, Berthoud (29 March 2011), "Elephant in Curzon Street", Discovering London, retrieved 14 August 2014
  50. Sheppard, F. H. W., ed. (1963), "The University of London at No. 6 Burlington Gardens", Survey of London: volumes 31 and 32: St James Westminster, Part 2, Institute of Historical Research, retrieved 6 February 2013

Bibliography

  • Blackwood, John (1989), London's Immortals: The Complete Outdoor Commemorative Statues, London and Oxford: Savoy Press, ISBN 978-0951429600
  • Ward-Jackson, Philip (2011), Public Sculpture of Historic Westminster: Volume 1, Public Sculpture of Britain, 14, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, ISBN 978-1-84631-691-3
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.