List of active South African Navy ships

List of active ships of the South African Navy.

Submarines

The South African Navy purchased three new Type 209/T.1400 class submarines (SSK) submarines to replace its decommissioned Daphné class submarines. As of 12 November 2018 three vessels are in commission.[1]

Class Name Pennant Commissioned Notes
Heroine Class SAS Manthatisi S101 7 April 2006[2][3] Built by Howaldtswerke at Kiel. Launched in June 2004. Named after the female warrior chief of the Batlokwa tribe.[4]
Heroine Class SAS Charlotte Maxeke S102 14 March 2007[5] Built by Thyssen Nordseewerke in Emden. Launched in May 2005. Arrived Simon's Town 27 April 2007. Charlotte Maxeke is named after the female political activist who campaigned for equality in the early 20th century.[4]
Heroine Class SAS Queen Modjadji S103 May 2008 Built by Thyssen Nordseewerke in Emden. Launched in May 2006. Named after the South African rain queen.[4]

Frigates

As of 14 January 2018 all 4 frigates are still in commission[6]

Class Name Pennant Commissioned Notes
Valour Class SAS Amatola (F145) F145 2005 Named after the location of the battles between the Xhosa people and Britain in the Amatola mountain range
Valour Class SAS Isandlwana (F146) F146 2006 Named for the Battle of Isandlwana
Valour Class SAS Spioenkop (F147) F147 2007 Named for the Battle of Spion Kop
Valour Class SAS Mendi (F148) F148 2007 Named for the SS Mendi, a ship that sunk carrying members of the 5th Battalion, South African Native Labour Corps

Fast attack craft (Offshore Patrol Vessel)

Warrior (ex Minister) class Fast Attack Craft (Missile) (FAC (M)): Modified (Sa'ar 4) (Israeli design). As of 14 January 2018 two remain in commission.[7] They have had their missiles and rear 76 mm guns removed and reassigned to the offshore patrol role until the acquisition of new off-shore patrol vessels under Project Biro.[8] As of late 2013 it appears that the SAN plan on operating 4 of these vessels for another 5 years with the SAS Adam Kok still awaiting conversion to the OPV configuration.[9][10]

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Notes
Warrior Class SAS Isaac Dyobha SAS Frans Erasmus P1565 16 Mar 1979[11] Named for former National Party cabinet minister Frans Erasmus; renamed after the Reverend Isaac Dyobha, a chaplain in the SA Native Labour Corps who died in the sinking of the SS Mendi in 1917[12]
Warrior Class SAS Galeshewe SAS Hendrik Mentz P1567 11 Feb 1983[11] Named for South African Party minister of defence Hendrik Mentz; renamed for the Tlhaping tribe's chief Galeshewe

Mine counter measures vessels

These mine countermeasure vessels were ordered in 1978 as research vessels to be operated by the Navy for the Department of Transport. The civilian Department of Transport was used as a ruse to circumvent United Nations Security Council Resolution 418. The lead ship, Navors I, was shipped to Durban from Germany in the heavy lift ship Uhenfels in June 1980 for fitting out.[13] She was shortly followed by the second. The last pair were built in Durban. The German boats were built by Abeking & Rasmussen and Sandock Austral in South Africa. The vessels were painted blue with white upperworks and formed the First Research Squadron. They were painted grey and renamed in 1982, but continued to fly the national flag and not the naval ensign. The prefix RV was only changed to SAS on 3 February 1988 when they were formally accepted as naval ships. Their minehunting capability could be enhanced by substituting the diving container on the after deck with lightweight mechanical and acoustic sweeping gear. They carry a RIB and a decompression chamber. The plan is to enhance them with second-generation minehunting system.[13] As of 14 January 2018 two vessels are in commission.[14]

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Notes
River Class[15] SAS Umkomaas RV Navors I M1499 1981 Named after the river Umkomaas, KwaZulu-Natal
River Class SAS Umzimkulu RV Navors III M1142 1981 Named after Umzimkulu River

Patrol vessels

Inshore patrol vessels

These boats are twin hulled catamarans of glass-reinforced plastic (GRP) sandwich construction. Capable of carrying up to 15 personnel. Ordered in mid-1991, each carries a RIB in the stern well.[11] Three of this type were also built for Israel in 1997. As 14 January 2018 three vessels are in commission.[7]

Class Name Pennant Commissioned Notes
Damen Stan patrol vessel TBD P1571[16] 2019 On order, Project Biro
Damen Stan patrol vessel TBD P1572[17] 2019 On order, Project Biro
Damen Stan patrol vessel TBD P1573[17] 2019 On order, Project Biro
T-Craft Class SAS Tobie P1552 1992
T-Craft Class SAS Tern P1553 1996
T-Craft Class SAS Tekwane P1554 1996 Named for Tekwane, South Africa

Harbour patrol boats

Class Name Pennant Commissioned Notes
Namacurra Class 26 ships[7] 1981–1982 Built in South Africa by Tornado Products in 1980-81.[18]
Y1520 transferred to Malawi on 29 October 1988[19]
Two transferred to Namibia in 2002.[19]
Two transferred to Mozambique in September 2004.[20]
Y1506 lost at sea off Port Elizabeth.[18]

Auxiliary vessels

Class Name Pennant Commissioned Notes
AOR SAS Drakensberg A301 11 November 1987 [21] Built by Sandock Austral, Durban. Fleet Replenishment Ship (AOR). Carries at least one Atlas Oryx helicopter.
Hecla Class SAS Protea A324 1972 [21] Built by Yarrow & Co Ltd, Glasgow, Scotland. Survey Ship. Launched 1971. Has a helideck and a hangar for a light helicopter.

Tugs

Class Name Previous Names Pennant Commissioned Notes
Damen ATD 2909 Coastal Tug Imvubu (Hippo in Zulu) 2015 Build by Damen Shipyard Cape Town, based on proven Royal Navy Design - SERCO[22]
Damen ATD2909 Coastal Tug Inyathi 2016 Build by Damen Shipyard Cape Town, based on proven Royal Navy Design - SERCO
Harbour Tug SAS Umalusi Golden Energy 1998 Completed in 1995 by Jaya Holding Ltd. Acquired from Taikong Trading Company in January 1997[23]
Damen Stan Tug 2006 Harbour TugZTRF Indlovu2006Built by Farocean Marine to a design from Dutch firm Damen Group—the vessels have special bows for handling the Navy's submarines.[24]
Damen Stan Tug 2006 Harbour TugZTTS Tschukundu2006Built by Farocean Marine to a design from Dutch firm Damen Group—the vessels have special bows for handling the Navy's submarines.[24]

See also

References

  1. "Submarines". www.navy.mil.za. Archived from the original on 10 July 2012. Retrieved 14 January 2018.
  2. Schmidt, Michael (8 April 2006). "Warrior queen arrives in Simon's Town". The Independent on Saturday. p. 2. Retrieved 8 April 2006.
  3. "S-101 Commissioned" (Press release). South African Navy. 3 November 2005. Archived from the original on 23 July 2011. Retrieved 6 December 2007.
  4. "NavalTechnology.com". SSK Manthatisi Class (Type 209/1400) Attack Submarine, South Africa. Archived from the original on 27 December 2009. Retrieved 1 August 2010.
  5. "South African Navy Commissions Charlotte Maxeke". Archived from the original on 29 February 2012. Retrieved 1 August 2010.
  6. "Valour-class Frigates". www.navy.mil.za. Archived from the original on 20 November 2012. Retrieved 14 January 2018.
  7. "Patrol Forces". www.navy.mil.za. Archived from the original on 14 August 2012. Retrieved 14 January 2018.
  8. Campbell, Keith (20 March 2014). "Start of acquisition process for six new SA Navy patrol vessels confirmed". Engineering News. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 14 August 2014.
  9. Odendaal, Natasha (4 October 2013). "South African Navy mulls future requirements as fleet remains active". Engineeringnews.co.za. Archived from the original on 7 February 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2014.
  10. "SA Navy in process of refurbishing". Bairdmaritime.com. 25 June 2013. Archived from the original on 23 September 2015. Retrieved 3 March 2014.
  11. "Patrol Forces". Navy.mil.za. Archived from the original on 14 August 2012. Retrieved 3 March 2014.
  12. "THE HISTORY OF THE SAS ISAAC DYOBHA". South African Navy website. Archived from the original on 17 September 2008. Retrieved 28 June 2010.
  13. "Mine Warfare Forces". Archived from the original on 8 June 2010. Retrieved 14 August 2014.
  14. "Mine Warfare Forces". www.navy.mil.za. Archived from the original on 8 June 2010. Retrieved 14 January 2018.
  15. Coastal Mine Hunters - MHC
  16. https://www.defenceweb.co.za/featured/damen-lays-keel-for-navys-first-ipv/
  17. "HISTORIC PENNANT NUMBERS & THE NEW BIRO IPVS". SA Navy Museum. 15 March 2019. Retrieved 15 March 2019.
  18. "DefenceWeb". Archived from the original on 19 July 2011. Retrieved 1 August 2010.
  19. "SA Navy Website". Role of the SA Navy. Archived from the original on 25 July 2010. Retrieved 1 August 2010.
  20. "France Diplomatie". Canal de Moçambique : Apoio a formação de marinheiros moçambicanos e a manutenção das lanchas Namacurra. French Government. Archived from the original on 1 May 2010. Retrieved 1 August 2010.
  21. "Auxiliary Equipment". www.navy.mil.za. Archived from the original on 10 July 2012. Retrieved 14 January 2018.
  22. Makuleni, S; Skommere, Palesa. "The arrival of the new Tug IMVUBU". SA Navy. Archived from the original on 15 September 2015. Retrieved 7 January 2016.
  23. "South African Navy". Archived from the original on 5 June 2010. Retrieved 1 August 2010.
  24. "Recent deliveries" (PDF). Damen Group. 2006. Archived from the original on 4 December 2011. Retrieved 4 December 2011. Two Damen Stan Tugs 2006, further developed in close cooperation with Farocean Marine, will be used in Simon’s Town harbour to fulfill their role as multi purpose workboats for the South African Navy. These vessels have a specially designed bow in order to assist the submarines when they touch base.
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.