List of U.S. Routes in New Mexico

U.S. Routes in the U.S. state of New Mexico account for 2,980.838 miles (4,797.194 km) of the state highway system. The first United States Numbered Highways U.S. Routes were formed in 1926,[1] and served as the primary thoroughfares across the entire state. Twenty six of the 33 counties in New Mexico are served by current U.S. Routes. The only counties lacking U.S. Route coverage are: Bernalillo, Cibola, Harding, Los Alamos, Mora, Sierra, and Valencia.[2]

Standard route signage in New Mexico
System information
Length2,980.838 mi[n 1] (4,797.194 km)
Highway names
InterstatesInterstate XX (I-XX)
US HighwaysU.S. Route XX (US XX)
StateState Road XX (NM XX)
System links
  • State Roads in New Mexico

One decommissioned U.S. Route, U.S. Route 66, colloquially known as the nation’s Mother Road,[3] and briefly known as U.S. Route 60,[4] crossed through Northern New Mexico, connecting the cities of Albuquerque and Gallup.[1] The state recognized its historical value, and has posted commemorative signs, and has painted the old shield on some of the roadways that make up the path of the former highway, such as New Mexico State Road 333.[5] Other highways have been renamed or renumbered, such as U.S. Route 491, which was formerly U.S. Route 666. With the 666 designation, the road was nicknamed Devil's Highway because of the common Christian belief that 666 is the Number of the Beast. The effort to get the route renumbered was led by New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson.[6]

The longest current U.S. Route in New Mexico is U.S. Route 70, spanning 448.264 miles (721.411 km) across southern New Mexico, while the shortest is U.S. Route 160, which clips the extreme northwestern corner of the state, measuring 0.86 miles (1.38 km) long between the Arizona and Colorado borders.[2] U.S. Route 160, in conjunction with New Mexico State Road 597, provide access to the Four Corners Monument where the states of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah meet.[7]

List

Number Length (mi)[2] Length (km) Southern or western terminus Northern or eastern terminus Formed Removed Notes
US 54 356.076573.049 US 54 at the Texas state lineUS 54 at the Texas state line 01926-01-011926[1]current
US 56 94.172151.555 I-25 Bus. in SpringerUS-56 at the Oklahoma state line 01957-01-011957[8]current
US 60 397.895640.350 US 60 at the Arizona state lineUS 60 at the Texas state line 01931-01-011931[9]current
US 62 109.710176.561 US 62 at the Texas state lineUS 62 at the Texas state line 01932-01-011932[10]current
US 64 430.634693.038 US 64 at the Arizona state lineUS 56 in Clayton 01926-01-011926[1]current
US 66 US 66 at the Arizona state lineUS 66 at the Texas state line 01926-01-011926[1]01985-01-011985[11] Replaced by I-40; also known as the Mother Road[3]
US 70 448.264721.411 US 70 at the Arizona state lineUS 70 at the Texas state line 01926-01-011926[1]current
US 80 US 80 at the Arizona state lineUS 80 at the Texas state line 01926-01-011926[1]01991-01-011991[12] Replaced by I-10; formed part of the Dixie Overland Highway
US 82 192.557309.890 US 54 near AlamogordoUS 82 at the Texas state line 01960-01-011960[13]current
US 84 288.864464.882 US 60 in Fort SumnerUS 84 at the Colorado state line 01936-01-011936[14]current
US 85 US 85 at the Texas state lineUS 85 at the Colorado state line 01926-01-011926[1] Replaced by I-10 and I-25; New Mexico portion still recognized by AASHTO[15]
US 87 9.49615.282 US 87 at the Texas state lineUS 56 / US 64 near Clayton
US 160 0.8611.386 US 160 at the Arizona state lineUS 160 at the Colorado state line Was formerly US 164
US 164 US 164 at the Arizona state lineUS 164 at the Colorado state line Renumbered US 160
US 180 163.634263.343 US 180 at the Arizona state lineI-10 Bus. in Deming
US 285 412.654664.102 US 285 at the Texas state lineUS 285 at the Colorado state line
US 366 US 366 at the Texas state lineUS 566 near Lincoln 01926-01-011926[1] Replaced by US 54
US 380 242.092389.609 I-25 near San AntonioUS 380 at the Texas state line
US 385 US 64US 385 at the Texas state line 01926-01-011926[1] Replaced by US 87
US 412 I-25 / US 85 at SpringerUS-56 / US-64 / US-412 at the Oklahoma state line Replaced by US 56; New Mexico portion still recognized by AASHTO.[15]
US 485 US 85 near Santa FeUS 85 near Raton 01926-01-011926[1]01933-01-011933[16] Replaced by US 64
US 491 107.308172.695 I-40 / NM 602 in GallupUS 491 at the Colorado state line Was formerly US 666
US 550 174.885281.450 I-25 in BernalilloUS 550 at the Colorado state line
US 566 US 85 near SocorroUS 70 in Clovis 01926-01-011926[1]01932-01-011932[17] Replaced by US 380
US 666 I-40 / NM 602 in GallupUS 666 at the Colorado state line 01926-01-011926[1]02003-01-012003[2] Renumbered US 491; also known as the Devil's Highway[6]
  •       Former

See also

  • U.S. Roads portal

Notes

  1. Sum of the mileage of current U.S. Routes listed, and cited, on this page.

References

  1. Bureau of Public Roads & American Association of State Highway Officials (November 11, 1926). United States System of Highways Adopted for Uniform Marking by the American Association of State Highway Officials (Map). 1:7,000,000. Washington, DC: U.S. Geological Survey. OCLC 32889555. Retrieved November 7, 2013 via University of North Texas Libraries.
  2. New Mexico Department of Transportation. "State Routes" (PDF). New Mexico Department of Transportation. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 16, 2011. Retrieved December 6, 2010.
  3. McClure, Rosemary (November 29, 2010). "Get your kicks on Route 66 -- and 499 other great highways". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved December 7, 2010.
  4. Rand McNally (1926). "New Mexico" (Map). Auto Road Atlas. Scale not given. Chicago: Rand McNally. p. 69. Retrieved December 7, 2010.
  5. "Route 66 Stencil Project In Moriaty" (PDF). ¿Que Pasa?. New Mexico Department of Transportation. August 2005. p. 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 26, 2006. Retrieved December 7, 2010.
  6. Weingroff, Richard F (June 18, 2003). "US 666: Beast of a Highway?". Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved November 11, 2007.
  7. Google (November 26, 2010). "NM 597" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved November 26, 2010.
  8. Official Road Map of New Mexico (ZIP File) (Map). 1:1,267,200. Cartography by Louis Hesch. Santa Fe: New Mexico State Highway Department. 1957. §§ 9B,8B. Retrieved August 3, 2019 via University of New Mexico RGIS.
  9. Weingroff, Richard (June 18, 2003). "U.S. Route 666: "Beast of a Highway"?". Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  10. Official Road Map of New Mexico (ZIP File) (Map). 1:1,267,200. Cartography by B.C. Broome & Louis Hesch. Santa Fe: New Mexico State Highway Department. 1932. Retrieved August 3, 2019 via University of New Mexico RGIS.
  11. "No more kicks on Route 66". Eugene Register-Guard. Associated Press. June 29, 1985. p. 10A. Retrieved December 7, 2010.
  12. Weingroff, Richard F. (April 6, 2010). "US Route 80: The Dixie Overland Highway". Highway History. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved December 4, 2010.
  13. Weingroff, Richard (June 27, 2017). "U.S. 82". Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  14. Official Road Map of New Mexico (ZIP File) (Map). 1:1,267,200. Cartography by B.C. Broome & Louis Hesch. Santa Fe: New Mexico State Highway Department. 1936. Retrieved August 3, 2019 via University of New Mexico RGIS.
  15. Special Committee on U.S. Route Numbering (December 2009). "U.S. Route Number Database". American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
  16. Official Road Map of New Mexico (ZIP File) (Map). 1:1,267,200. Cartography by B.C. Broome & Louis Hesch. Santa Fe: New Mexico State Highway Department. 1933. Retrieved August 3, 2019 via University of New Mexico RGIS.
  17. End of US highway 566, retrieved August 20, 2019
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