List of Sydney Harbour ferries

This is a list of passenger ferries operating or formerly operating on Sydney Harbour. It includes ferries serving the Manly run.

NameYear BuiltDescriptionOrigin of nameTonsLength (m)PassengersClass/TypeOut of service
Rose Hill Packet1789A hoy launched in 1789, in the year following the settlement of Sydney. Also known as 'The Lump', it was used to transport goods and passengers up the Parramatta River. The return journey could take a week between Sydney and Parramatta.12 tons (bm)11m-13mPacket or Hoyc.1800
Surprise1831Launched in 1831 in Neutral Bay for the Parramatta service, Surprise was the first Australian built steamship and the first steam ferryboat in Sydney. In service for six months with limited financial success. Her draught was too deep for the route and she was sent to Tasmania. Sold to Hobart in 1832.[1][2]40 tons24 mPaddle steamer1832
Sophia Jane1826An auxiliary steamer, built in the United Kingdom in 1826, arrived in Sydney in 1831 and fitted out for excursions around the harbour with limited financial success.[1] She was too deep in the draft for Parramatta River service and was used on coastal trips north and south of Sydney.[3]  38 m  Auxiliary steamer  
Experiment1832Due to high cost and difficulty in sourcing steam engines at the time, this vessel used horses on treadmill attached to a central wheel to propel her via paddle wheels. Provided a Sunday's-only service to Balmain from 1840. Converted to steam and in 1846 was sent to Brisbane to become that town's first ferry.[1][4]Unusually had horses drive paddle wheels.38 tons24 m100Paddle steamer1846
Australia1834Paddle steamer built by the Australia Steam Conveyance Company for Parramatta service for a cost of £200. 12 hp (9 kW) steam engines. A financial success with the company paying a dividend in 1836 of 38 per cent, possibly because there was little competition apart from sailing craft. Withdrawn from Parramatta service following the introduction of Comet (1843) and used on Balmain, Five Dock, and Iron Cove runs.[1][4][5]45 tons25.3 mPaddle steamer1863
Rapid1837Second vessel ordered by the Australian Steam Conveyance Company following the success of Australia (1834). Built in the United Kingdom and sent to Sydney for re-assembly. The first double-ended ship in Australia. Copper boiler, 20 hp (14.9 kW) engine, iron hulled. Ninety-minute trip on Parramatta service. Ran aground at Glebe Point in 1863 where she was used as a house boat.[1][4][6]1852
Kangaroo1840Paddle steamer built for Parramatta service. Bought in 1847 by Tasmanian Government for use in Hobart. Later worked in Melbourne until 1891.[1]Australian native animal1847
RavenPaddle steamer built for Parramatta service.[7]Paddle steamer
Waterman1844Paddle steamer built for Parramatta service.[7] 8 hp engine. Began frequent services to Balmain run by Messers Flood, Perdriau and Fennmore but the small ferry was unreliable and not popular.17 tons15 mPaddle steamer1874
William IVUnusual style of paddle wheel.[8]
Emu1843Double-ended iron paddle steamer built for Parramatta service and later serviced Balmain route. Similar to Black Swan and Pelican. Assembled from parts imported from the United Kingdom. Her 1 metre draft was well-suited to river work. 30 hp (22.4 kW) jet-condensing steam engine drove 4.2m paddlewheels, giving speed that was stiff competition for the older Australia. Similar to Black Swan and Pelican. Also use from 1855 as inaugural weekday service twice a day to Manly.[7][9][10][11] Wrecked 24 April 1884.Australian native bird65 tons28.6 m150Paddle steamer1884
Comet1843Wooden paddle steamer built by William Lowe in Clarencetown for Parramatta service. 35 hp triple expansion steam engine.[7] until bought in 1852 by syndicate that included Thomas Mort. Sold again the following year for £3,100 and transferred to Melbourne. Bought in 1862 and sent to New Zealand but sank en-route.[12]50 tons30.1 mPaddle steamer1862
Native1844Boiler exploded in 1850, renamed Maid of the Mill and later sold to Brisbane.[13]18.3 mPaddle steamer1862
Ferry Queen1844a Gerrard Brothers boat.[14][15]-8 tons40?
Gypsy Queen1844Wooden paddle steamer built by Thomas Chowne, Pymont for Gerrard brothers.[14][15]-8 tons40
The Brothers1847Unlike most of the Harbour's early paddle steamers, she was not an excursion boat but a ferry. Served on a variety of early routes and was one of the first regular Manly ferries. A Gerrard Brothers boat.[14][16]Named after owners John and Joseph Gerrard.[10]50 tons20.6 m50 passengers1886
Cobra1849Iron paddle tug built in Swansea, South Wales. Designed as a tug-tender, she worked in Melbourne then Launceston, and then Hobart before working in Sydney from 1869. Her main Sydney role was a tug, and sometimes as a cargo vessel. On occasion, she would transport passengers to Manly. Transferred to Newcastle in 1874, and lasted until circa. 1917.[17]1874 to Newcastle
Agenoria1850a Gerrard Brothers boat. Sold to Melbourne 1852.[14]22 tons15.8 m1852
Star1852Wrecked in 185744 tons22.3 m1857
Black Swan1854Iron paddle steamer built by C.J. Mare & Co, Blackwell, England and reassembled in Sydney for Parramatta service.[7] 35 hp oscillating steam engine. Sister to Pelican, similar to Emu. In 1859 and 1860, ran Sunday and holiday services to Mosman with Perri. Also used to provide services to Manly. Rebuilt and lengthened in 1865. Wrecked 4 June 1868.[10][11]40 tons, 1865: 69 tons27.6 m, 1865: 33.5 m150Paddle steamer1868, wrecked
Pelican1854Paddle steamer built for Parramatta service. Sister to Black Swan, similar to Emu. Also used to provide services to Manly. Sank 3 April 1888.[7][10][11]42 tons27.6 m165Paddle steamer1888
Herald1854a Gerrard Brothers boat, sent out in sections from England. Steered by a tiller at either end, she often worked as a tug. Richard Hayes Harnett used her from 1871 to start a ferry service to Mosman Bay, and used on most runs across her career.[16][18] She sank off North Head in 1884 while waiting to tow a ship into the harbour.[14]22.9 m501884
Premier185619 tons23.2 mPaddle steamer1891
Pearl (I)185611 tons16.8 mPaddle steamer1891
Peri185622 tons16.8 mPaddle steamer1886
Nautilus (I)1856a North Shore Ferry company vessel.[14]36 tons16 m1891
Phantom1858Iron paddle steamer built in Melbourne by J Daw, most of her service was on Manly run for the Brighton and Manly Beach Steam Company. The first of the large double-ended Manly ferries. 50 hp steam engine. Also thought to be the first vessel in the long standing Manly ferry livery of dark green hull and white funnel with black topping. Long and narrow (beam 4.0 m) paddle steamer with shallow draft made for unpleasant rides across Sydney Heads in bad weather. Her design was used on future Manly ferries. Broken up in Pyrmont c. 1886[10][16]63 tons36.3 m160Manly ferry, paddle steamer1886
Ysobel1860Built by P.N. Russell & Co. Sydney. Joubert's first ferry, to Hunters Hill. Possibly Sydney's first screw-propelled ferryboat, however, there is no confirmation that it was not a paddle steamer.[19]
Kirribilli (I)1861A small double-ended wooden paddle steamer steered with a tiller at either end. Built by John Cuthbert, Sydney. 8 hp power steam engine. First ferry in North Shore Ferry Company[14] Then transferred to be the second ferry on the Hunters Hill run.Australian Aboriginal name meaning 'good fishing spot', and name of a Sydney suburb11 tons601879, wrecked
Cygnet1862Paddle steamer built for Parramatta service. In the early 1890s, used by the Manly Co-operative Steam Ferry Limited set up to compete, ultimately unsuccessfully, with the Port Jackson Steamship Company. Re-engined in 1879, hulked in August 1891.[7][20]young swan30 tons27.1 mPaddle steamer1891
Gypsy Queena Gerrard Brothers boat.[14] Took over from Waterman on the Balmain run in 1846.
Brightside, formerly Emu (II)1865Originally built in 1865 as Emu (II) by A & J Inglis, Glasgow and re-assembled at Kangaroo Point, Brisbane for use on Brisbane River and Moreton Bay. Two inverter diagonal steam, 70 hp. 10 knots. Originally owned by Queensland Steam Navigation Company. Came to Pork Jackson Steam Boat Company in January 1877 through to 1909. Renamed Brightside in 1887. Sank in 1897, converted to cargo vessel in 1902 and worked the Manly route until 1908 when she was gutted by fire. The hull was converted to a lighter, and broken up in 1909.[14][21][22]269 tons52.1 m800Paddle steamer1908
Adelaide, later Swan1866Double-ended paddle steamer on Parramatta River service for Parramatta River Steamship Company with several subsequent owners. Rebuilt and renamed Swan in 1879. Thought to have been broken up around 1900.[23]1900(?)
Transit1866a North Shore Ferry company vessel.[24]69 tons24 m
Galatea1868a North Shore Ferry company vessel.[14]21 m
Royal Alfred1868Wooden paddle steamer built by George Beddoes, Auckland. 60 hp 2 x oscillating steam engines. 11 knots. First regular saloon steamer on Manly service. Also used as a tug, cargo carrier, and excursion ferry.141 tons40.3 m7501893
Mystery1852Wooden paddle steamer built by Money Wigram & Co, Northam, England. 60 hp 2 x grasshopper side lever steam engines by George Butchard. 9 knots. 60 hp 2 x oscillating steam engines. 11 knots. Imported by Manly Ferry Company to join Royal Alfred as a tug, cargo carrier, and excursion ferry. Converted to a lighter 1893141 tons40.3 m7501893
Florence1872Wooden screw steamer built by W. Dunn, Lavender Bay. 8 hp steam engine by Chapman & Co. A North Shore Ferry company vessel.[14] Provided first regular daytime runs to Mosman.15 tons16.9 m1900
Coombra1872a North Shore Ferry company vessel. Burnt out 1888.[14][20]45 tons23.8 m1888
Aberona187?Serviced the Mosman and Neutral Bay routes[18]
Bungaree (Beengaree)187361 tons23.7 m(punt)1900
Darra1875a North Shore Ferry company vessel.[14]57 tons24.9 m1883
Victor1878a Gerrard Brothers boat.[14][25]24 tons15.8 m?
Nell1878a North Shore Ferry company vessel.[14] Wrecked 1883.[26]71 tons25.4 m1883
Fairlight1878Paddle steamer on Manly run. Built in Whiteinch, Scotland and sailed and paddled to Sydney in fifty-six days. Costing £16,000 including delivery, the Port Jackson Steamship Company mortgaged itself heavily to pay for the vessel. Steel-hulled with two-deck timber super-structure. Captain Mickleson was both her delivery master and her first master upon entering service. In Britain, she was rated for 1,100 passengers, but Sydney surveyors rated her for 950 passengers on account of the large swells across the Sydney Heads. Converted to two lighters in Brisbane.[27][28] The third double-ended steamer on the Manly run and first to be specifically designed for the route.A suburb near Manly.315 tons52.1 m950Manly ferry, paddle steamer1914.
SS Wallaby1879Sydney's first double-ended screw ferry, and the second in the world. (When ordered by the North Shore Steam Ferry Company, she was the first ordered, however, a Liverpool to Birkenhead ferry in England was the first in service). Built by Norman Selfe. This remained the basic design of all Sydney double-ended screw ferries. First Sydney ferry to have half wheel and chains, a steering system used on Sydney ferry steamers for almost another fifty years.[16] Wheelhouses were added later. Unusually, lower deck passenger area was full width of hull with no bulwarks. Wallaby was not an immediate success, and the North Shore Steam Ferry Company continued to build steamers through to 1885. Converted to a tug in 1918, then a lighter, and broken up in 1926.[14]a native Australian animal163 tons32.9 m329-1918
Bennelong or Benelon1880Vehicular ferry. Sunk 1939Bennelong was a senior man of the Eora204 tons36.6 m28 vehicles, 84 passengersVehicular ferry1932.
RoseWith Swansea, provided the first regular Watsons Bay services
St Leonards1880Paddle steamer, decommissioned in 1901 and used as floating pontoon at Neutral Bay and Hunters Hill[29]a Sydney suburb110 tons33.5 m475-1901.
Alathea, Aleathea1881Built by Rock Davis. Both decks largely closed in. Sydney's first electrically lit ferry, and one of the first double-ended screw ferries. North Shore Steam Ferry company bought her from Parramatta River Steam and Tram Company. Travelling at 6.5 knots, she lost the 'forward' propeller and her speed immediately increased to 9 knots. 1892 re-engined (50 hp compound steam by Bow, McLachlan % Co) and converted to single-ended vessel with her lower deck closed in. Converted to lighter in 1913 and her engines placed in the Karingal launched that year.[5][30][31]79 tons, 1892: 120 tons33.3 m5001913
Brighton1883Iron-hulled paddler. Built by T.B. Sheath & Co., Rutherglen, Scotland. 160 hp (1890s: 230 hp) 2 x compound diagonal osciallating steam engine by A. Campbell & Son. 15 knots. A popular well-appointed Manly ferry. The largest paddle steamer operated on Sydney Harbour and the last on the Manly run, she was sold in 1916 becoming a store ship in Port Stephens.[28]67.1 m1200Manly ferry, paddle steamer1916
Port Jackson1883Screw steamer used as Manly cargo vessel with passenger facilities. Could also be used as a tug.[28][32]108 tons
Balmain1883Paddle steamer. Built by B.S. Bridges of Balmain for the Balmain Steam Ferry Company. From 1901, run by the Balmain New Ferry Company. Replaced by the second series of Lady class ferries and broken up around 1910.[33]Sydney suburb117 tons36.5 mPaddle steamer1910
Victoria1883Paddle steamer built by Watty Ford of Berry's Bay. Typical of the shape of North Shore Steam Ferry Company's double-ended paddle fleet. Incorporated into Sydney Ferry Company's fleet in 1900. Transferred to Melbourne about 10 years later.[34]119 tons34.1 m4341910(?) to Melbourne
Warrane1883Vehicular ferry. Photo: Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences109 tons30.2 m14 vehicles, 144 passengersVehicular ferry1931
Halcyon188482 tons30.2 m2901933
Gannet188448 tons19.8 m2131930s
Cammeray1884Used as floating pontoon and wharf.[29]Cammeray is named after the Cammeraygal tribe197 tons39.3 m6751908
Neutral Bay, later Thelma1885Renamed Thelma in 1897.[26]A Sydney harbourside suburb50 tons21.0 m1920s
Bunya Bunya1885Typical of Sydney Harbour paddle steamer ferries, she was the largest and last of them. Sold in 1910 and used as a pontoon at Gladesville Bridge wharf. Sister to Waratah (II).[35][36]Araucaria bidwillii, the bunya pine202 tons64.6 m688Paddle steamer1914
Waratah (II)1885Paddle steamer. Later used as floating pontoon and wharf. Sister to Bunya Bunya.[29][36]Australian-endemic genus of large shrubs including the NSW State floral emblem.197 tons36.6 m695Paddle steamer1910
Lincoln1886Balmain paddle steamer117 tons36.5 m400
Leichhardt1886Balmain screw steamer68 tons23.1 m370
Lotus1886Cargo vessel 1918-193970 tons22.6 m2681918
Narrabeen (I)1886Paddle steamer built by Mort's Docks for Port Jackson Steam Ship Company. Smaller and of lower passenger capacity than Brighton, she was used on off peak services to Manly. With the introduction of the larger Bingarra class and larger screw ferries, in 1911 she was modified for use as a cargo ferry with derricks fitted at either end. Hulked about 1917.[17]Narrabeen239 tons48.8 mManly ferry1917
Swansea1887With Rose, provided the first regular Watson's Bay services[37]60 tons359
Me Mel1888Paddle steamer built for Balmain Steam Ferry Company. On 31 January 1914, sank in four minutes without loss of life after being hit at her wharf by steamer Mokau.174 tons38.1 m580paddle steamer
BeeServed the Watson's Bay run.[37] Unusually, had a canoe stern. Replaced by ex-Balmain ferry, Bald Rock, and sent to Brisbane.
Oceana1886Served the Watson's Bay run, wrecked on the bar of Manning River while en route to work for Manning River Ferry Company.[37][38]34 tons18.2 m2401903
Jenny LindServed the Watson's Bay run for the Watson Bay Regular Steam Ferry Company
Golden Rose1872Served the Watson's Bay run for the Watson Bay Regular Steam Ferry Company. Also served on early Mosman services in 1870s.[18]12 tons11.4 m1891
Zeus1878Served on early Mosman services in 1870s.[18] Wrecked 189216 tons, 1898: 35 tons16.0 m1892
SpeedwellServed on early Mosman services in 1870s.[18]
MatildaServed on early Mosman services in 1870s.[18]
MascotteServed the Watson's Bay run for the Watson Bay Steam Ferry Company
Elaine1882Served the Watson's Bay run for the Watson Bay Steam Ferry Company.18 tons15.4 m3101914(?)
Petrel1883Served the Watson's Bay run for the Watson Bay Steam Ferry Company26 tons, 1898: 35 tons18.1 m
Admiral1883One of several ferries in the early 1890s, used by the Manly Co-operative Steam Ferry Limited set up to compete, ultimately unsuccessfully, with the Port Jackson Steamship Company.121 tons31.1 m1896, to New Zealand
Psyche1884Served the Watson's Bay run for the Watson Bay Steam Ferry Company42 tons21.4 m
Marra Marra1884One of several ferries in the early 1890s, used by the Manly Co-operative Steam Ferry Limited set up to compete, ultimately unsuccessfully, with the Port Jackson Steamship Company.66 tons25.3 m1896, to New Zealand
VictorServed the Watson's Bay run for the Watson Bay Regular Steam Ferry Company
Bald RockWooden paddle steamer. Built in Balmain by G. Duncan for Balmain service.[35] 35 hp steam engine by Atlas Engineering Co. Renamed Vaucluse in September 1900. Later transferred to Watsons Bay service replacing Bee. Name reverted to Bald Rock in 1905. Sold to Melbourne 1907, broken up 1928.location in Balmain105 tons34.3 mPaddle steamer1907
Courier1887Served the Watson's Bay and Balmain runs. Contracted to the P & O Line, she was on call whenever one of their liners was in Sydney Harbour65 tons22.8 m300
Genista1886Built in Lavender Bay in 1886 by W. Dunn for H. Perdriau was a single-ended vessel used as a ferry, for cruising, and occasional tug work. In 1889, she was sold to Westernport Bay and Flinders Steam Ship Company to work on Westernport Bay. Broken up in 1933.[39]24.3 m2001889 (to Victoria)
Pheasant1887First vessel on Sydney Harbour with triple expansion steam engines. Engines were later used in the Karrabee (1913),[30] and are now part of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences collection.[40] Converted to lighter, 1914–1918138 tons33.5 m4601914(?)
Birkenhead1888Balmain screw steamer.Sydney locality115 tons26.5 m440
Kangaroo (II)1891Wooden screw steamer built by David Drake Ltd. First double-ended ferry with triple-expansion engines. 60 hp triple expansion steam engines by Muir & Houston. Burnt out in 1900 and rebuilt 1901. Worked on North Sydney service before being transferred to Mosman service.[41] Sold for breaking up 1926.Australian native animal158 tons34.1 m632K class1926
Lady Mary1892First of a number of series of 'Lady' ferries. Part of the Balmain New Ferry Company fleet until that company's takeover by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1918.[42] Became a houseboat after her service as a ferry.[35]79 tons25.3 m393Lady class, first series1928
Lady Napier1892Part of the Balmain New Ferry Company fleet until that company's takeover by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1918.[42][43]89 tons29.9 m450Lady class, first series1920 laid up(?)
Lady Manning1893Part of the Balmain New Ferry Company fleet until that company's takeover by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1918.[42]97 tons33.2 m475Lady class, first series1928
Conqueror1893One of several ferries in the early 1890s, used by the Manly Co-operative Steam Ferry Limited set up to compete, ultimately unsuccessfully, with the Port Jackson Steamship Company. Later transferred to South Australia
Waringa Karaga1894Originally built in 1894 with open deck which was glassed-in about 1910, renamed Karaga in 1913, and taken over by US forces in 1943.[44]125 tons32.2m588K class1943
Barangaroo1896Vehicular paddle ferry. Sank off Terrigal Haven 1933Wife of Bennelong, a senior man of the Eora205 tons36.4 m26 vehicles, 86 passengersVehicular ferry1932
Manly (II)1896Wooden screw steamer. Built by Young, Son & Fletcher, Balmain NSW. Designed by renowned naval architect Walter Reeks, the first double-ended screw ferry on the Manly run.[45] 100 hp triple expansion steam engine. 14 knots. In July 1901, broke down as it passed Old Man's Hat and was pushed close to a bombora. Brighton towed Manly into North Harbour where she was safely beached. In 1922, set a record time of 22 minutes for trip to Manly which has not been beaten by conventional ferry (hydrofoils did the run in 15 minutes). Broken up in 1926229 tons44.8 m820Manly ferry1924
Wallaroo Kiamala1896Originally built with open upper deck, rebuilt and glassed-in with named changed to Kiamala in 1914. Taken over by US forces in 1943. Sister to Carabella.[36][46]Wallaroo, Australian native animal.122 tons32.4 m545K class1943
Lady Hampden1896Part of the Balmain New Ferry Company fleet until that company's takeover by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1918.[42] Requisitioned for naval use in 1942. Sunk as target.135 tons35.1 m636Lady class, first series1942
Carabella Karabella1897Sister to Wallaroo/Kiamala.[36] Rebuilt 1916. Used by the US forces in World War 2.[36][46]After a house built on North Shore in 1882-'Carrably'129 t, 1916: 151 t32 m595K class1943
Una1898Burnt 4 April 1927Australian Aboriginal word meaning 'fancy name'44 tons20.6 m1801927
Rose1898One of Joubert's Lane Cover ferries. Service speed of 10 knots. Designed well for river work with high wheelhouse to see over crowd and a good balance of open and closed areas. Burnt out on 4 April 1927 when Lane Cove service was near its end.[39]80 tons25.6 m1927
Bronzewing1899Wooden screw steamer. The largest of Sydney single-ended ferries, she had a shallow draft and could exceed 12 knots. The last traditional 'river type' boat built for the Parramatta service. Glazed-in all around, and other open ferries were updated to match. Built by R. YOung & Son, Balmain. 35 hp triple expansion steam engine by Ross & Duncan. 12 knots. Withdrawn from that service in 1931, used by Sydney Ferries Ltd until scrapping in 1931.[30][35]a bird149 tons33.5 m5001933
Kurraba1899Similar to Kirribilli (II)Sydney harbourside suburb195 tons40.9 m890K class1934
Kirribilli (II)1900Similar to Kurraba. Served various North Shore runs. Retired following opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge.[47]Australian Aboriginal name meaning 'good fishing spot', and name of a Sydney suburb198 tons39.7 m896K class1934
Kuring-gai (II)1901Designed by renowned naval architect, Walter Reeks. Iron framed, steel plated double-ended screw ferry, and the first of the familiar Manly ferry shape of the 20th century. Built at Mort's Dock and Engineering in Balmain.[45] 85 hp triple expansion steam engines by builder. 15 knots. Reboilered in 1922. Her capacity of 1,228 passengers became too small for the booming Manly route and was sold to Newcastle 1928, to be used as a ferry on the then Walsh Island (Kooragang). Also ran excursions to Raymond Terrace, Nelsons Bay and Broughton Island. Tied up and hulked in 1934. The wooden superstructure was demolished and in World War II, US forces used her in New Guinea as a storage barge. After WWII, the vessel was towed back to Newcastle, moored at Hexham and finally sank in the mud near Hexham Bridge, still visible.[48]Ethnonym referring to indigenous Australian peoples from between the Gamilaraay and Sydney497 tons51.8 m1,228Manly ferry1928
Kamilaroi1901Slow vessel due to experimental mounting of engines with pistons running horizontal. Broken up 1932an Australian Aboriginal tribe328 tons39.0 m28 vehicles, 174 passengers.[35]Vehicular ferry1932
Koree1902First North Shore ferry with enclosed promenade deck passenger house.An Australian Aboriginal name for Chowder Bay276 tons42.8 m1,058K class1934
Kailoa1902Built in 1902 as a tug, Greyhound II, converted into a ferry about 1908 to run the Clifton Gardens service for Sydney Ferries Ltd. Reconverted to tug in 1917.[49][50]1941
Kummulla1903168 tons36.3 m797K class1934
Lady Rawson1903Part of the Balmain New Ferry Company fleet until that company's takeover by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1918.[42] Differing to the other early Lady Class ferries, had open-air extended shelters for passengers on upper deck. Made redundant with the 1932 opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge.[51]172760Lady class, second series1934
Vaucluse (II)1905Wooden double-ended screw steamer. Built by Rock Davis, Blackwall, NSW. 70 hp steam engine by Chapman & Co. Ltd. 14 knots. Served the Watson Bay run. Part of the Watsons Bay and South Shore Ferry Company which was bought by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1920.[42] The first of the Walter Reeks double-ended single-screw designs and built by Rock Davis of Brisbane Waters. Able to achieve bursts of 15 knots, was the fastest ferry at the time being able to overtake Manly ferries on route to Watsons Bay. She carried a brass rooster on her jackmast to identify her as the fastest boat on the harbour.[41][52][53] Expensive to run.[49] On 4 October 1916 en route from Circular Quay, collided with Royal Australian Navy steam yacht, Franklin, and began to sink with 100 passengers aboard. Passing ferry, Kirawa, towed her to Garden Island where she was made fast.[54] With the Vaucluse run declining due to competition from trams and private car, the vessel was sold to Newcastle 1931 and its fate is unknown. The Vaucluse service was abandoned in 1933.[25][49]a suburb in Sydney's east121 tons42.5m7091931
Kulgoa1905Australian Aboriginal word meaning 'returning'338 tons42.7 m1,255K class1952
Binngarra,1905Steel screw steamer. Designed by Captain Christie and built by Morts Dock & Engineering. First of the Binngarra class Manly ferry that was the model for the Manly ferry throughout the 20th century. First Manly ferry with wheelhouses at the end of the top deck. The first of six near identical sister ships Bellubera and Barrenjoey (later North Head).[55] 103 hp triple expansion steam engine by builder. 14 knots. Ran 98,279 round trips to Manly. Converted to lighter 1933 and used in Port Stephens. Hull later used in New Guinea as a cargo hulk for United States Navy during World War II. Scuttled 1946Australian Aboriginal word meaning 'returning'442 tons57.9 m1372 (summer) / 858 (winter)Manly ferry, Binngarra type1933
Lady Northcote1905Part of the Balmain New Ferry Company fleet until that company's takeover by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1918.[42] First double-ended screw ferry in Sydney built for single-screw propulsion.[56] Converted to diesel power in the 1930s.[57] Similar to Lady Rawson but with raised wheelhouses. Along with Lady Rawson, was the largest of the series and sported two funnels. Sold and hulked 1941. Scuttled in Pittwater 1945Wife of Henry Northcote, 1st Baron Northcote128 tons35.3 m605Lady class, second series1941
Kareela1905Nicknamed 'The Box'.[41] Retired after Kosciusko returned service following conversion to diesel power.Australian Aboriginal word for 'south wind'106 tons34.4 m784K class1959
King Edward1905Served the Watson Bay area until 1934,[41] and set new standards for speed and comfort.[52] Part of the Watsons Bay and South Shore Ferry Company which was bought by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1920.[42] Sold in 1934 following the cessation of the Vaucluse service in 1933.98 tons31.1 m5401934
Lady Linda1906Part of the Balmain New Ferry Company fleet until that company's takeover by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1918.[42]13 tons13.1 m1934
Kai Kai1906To Navy 1942, sold for breaking up 1947Australian Aboriginal word for 'jewfish' or 'food'303 tons46.3 m1245K class1942
Kookooburra1907Represents Sydney Ferries Ltd's first attempt to design ferry specifically for Parramatta River service after it took over the service in 1901. Unusually for K class, it was originally fitted with a short funnel for service along the river and its low bridges. Passengers, however, were showered with soot and awning was placed on promenade deck.[58] Kaludah was a similar design. Following cessation of services past Gladesville Bridge in 1928, she was fitted with tall funnel.[59] In late 1940s, was sent to Newcastle to carry dockyard workers. Broken up in 1959.[60]Australian native bird180 tons42.7 m700K class1948-49(?)
Burra-bra1908Second of the Binngarra class Manly ferry. Almost identical sister ship to Binngarra (1905), Bellubera (1910), Balgowlah (1912), Barrenjoey (1913 – later North Head, and Baragoola Sold to Navy in 1942. Broken up c. 1950.[61][62]An Australian Aboriginal name for The Spit.[63] 458 tons59.4 m1437 (summer) / 916 (winter)Manly ferry, Binngarra type1942
Lady Carrington1908Part of the Balmain New Ferry Company fleet until that company's takeover by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1918.[42] Sold for breaking up 1934.146 tons39.6 m701Lady class, second series1934
Killara (II)1909Vehicular ferry, sold for service on Westernport Bay in 1933 following the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. Sold to Melbourne authorities 1944. Later broken up in Tasmania. Similar to Kedumba.[60][64]309 tons40.049 passengers, 33 vehiclesVehicular ferry1933
Kaludah, formerly Kuranda1909Of similar design to Kookooburra to pass under low bridges on Parramatta River service.[58] Caught fire at her moorings in 1911, drifted downstream, brought under tow alight by fire boat Pelvius, burnt herself to the water line and sank in Tarban Creek...the shortest lived of the Sydney ferries. Engines went to the Kamiri.[1][55]137 tons35.1 mK class1911
Kanimbla Kurra-Ba1910Similar to Kosciusko. Gave up her original name, Kanimbla, in 1935 to a bigger ship, and became Kurra-Ba.[65]Australian Aboriginal word for 'Big fight'156 tons35.4 m791K class1946(?)
Bellubera1910Third of the Binngarra class Manly ferry. Almost identical sister ship to Binngarra (1905), Burra-bra (1908), Balgowlah (1912), Barrenjoey (1913 – later North Head, and Baragoola. 1936, first Australian ship to be converted to diesel-electric engines with Harland and Woolf engines. Fire destroyed her superstructure while tied up overnight with the death of 1 crewman. Rebuilt in 1937. 1954 updated with English Electric units. Retired 1973, scuttled off Long Reef 1980.[61]Thought to be an Australian Aboriginal word for "pretty lady" or "beautiful woman".[66]499 tons (1936: 505 tons)64.0 m1,490 (summer)/962 (winter). (1936: 1,318)Manly ferry, Binngarra type1973
Kirrule1910Identical sister to Kiandra & Kubu. Along with her sisters, they were given greater power than earlier vessels of the same size so that longer runs to Mosman were quicker. All three vessels survived the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, but Kirrule and Kiandra were laid up immediately following State Government takeover of Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1951. Kubu was laid up following Kanangra's return to service following conversion to diesel.[67]Australian Aboriginal word for 'aroused'258 tons42.7 m1100K class1951
Lady Chelmsford1910Built by Brisbane Waters shipbuilder Rock Davis. Similar to Lady Edeline, Lady Denman, Lady Scott, and Lady Ferguson. Part of the Balmain New Ferry Company fleet until that company's takeover by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1918.[42] In 1933, became first Sydney Ferries Ltd vessel to be converted to diesel. Gardner diesel, two strike five-cylinder providing 190 hp (141 kW) and 10.3 knots. Sent to Adelaide in 1971 and rebuilt as show boat. In 1985 moved to Melbourne where she sank in 2008 and was broken up in 2011.[68]Wife of Governor of NSW, Frederic Thesiger, 1st Viscount ChelmsfordLady class, third series1971
Kiandra1911Identical sister to Kirrule & Kubu. Laid up immediately following State Government takeover of Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1951a corruption of Aboriginal 'Gianderra' for 'sharp stones for knives' and town in NSW258 tons42.7 m1,101K class1951
Greycliffe1911Served the Watson's Bay run. Part of the Watsons Bay and South Shore Ferry Company which was bought by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1920.[42] In 1927, sunk in collision with liner Tahiti with the loss of 40 lives.133 tons38.1 m1927
Kosciusko1911Similar to Kanimbla. Converted to diesel in 1959, allowing coal-fired Kareela to be retired. Towed to Hobart following collapse of bridge. Burnt out in Hobart 1982. End of hull including propeller and rudder displayed outside hotel in Hobart.[69][70]Australian mountain named after Polish military leader Tadeusz Kościuszko165 tons35.4 m792K class1975
Balgowlah1912Fourth of the Binngarra class Manly ferry. Steel double-ended screw steamer. Sister ship to Bellubera (1910), Barrenjoey (1913 – later North Head and similar to Binngarra (1905), Burra-bra (1908), and Baragoola (1922). Built by Mort's Dock & Engineering. 122 hp triple expansion steam engine by builder. 16 knots. Hulked 1953[61]Name of Sydney suburb499 tons64.0 m1517 (summer) / 982 (winter)Manly ferry, Binngarra type1953
Kanangra1912Sister ship to Kirawa who were the only steel-hull K Class vessels. The last of the inner-harbour ferries to be converted to diesel re-entering service in 1959. Retired 1985. Now part of Sydney Heritage Fleet and under restoration. One of the longest serving Sydney ferries and the last of the large early twentieth century Sydney ferries.Australian Aboriginal word for 'beautiful view'295 tons50 m1000K class1985
Kirawa1912Sister ship to Kanangra who were the only steel-hull K Class vessels. Retired in 1953 due to faulty boiler tubes.[71]Australian Aboriginal word for 'looking for them'-50 m1000K class1953
Kubu1912Identical sister to Kiandra & Kirrule. The last coal-fired steam ferry on Port Jackson. Removed from service following Kanangra's return to service after conversion to diesel. Broken up in 1960.Australian Aboriginal word for 'oak tree'258 tons42.7 m1072K class1959
Kamiri1912Sister to Kameruka. Retired in 1951 upon state government takeover of Sydney Ferries Ltd.[72]Name of Aboriginal Australian tribe144 tons34.1 m594K class1951
Lady Denman1912Built by J Dent of Jervis Bay. Similar to Lady Edeline, Lady Chelmsford, Lady Scott, and Lady Ferguson. Part of the Balmain New Ferry Company fleet until that company's takeover by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1918.[42] Converted to diesel power in the 1930s.[57] Now part of museum on NSW South Coast.Gertrude Denman, wife of fifth Governor-General of Australia96 tons33.5 m500Lady class, third series
Barrenjoey, later North Head1913Fifth of the Binngarra class Manly ferry. Almost identical sister ship to Binngarra (1905), Burra-bra (1908), Bellubera (1910), Balgowlah (1912), and Baragoola (1922).[61] Converted to diesel electric in 1951, and renamed North Head – significantly modified in appearance with two short funnels, enclosed top deck and new hull shape.[73]Barrenjoey is a headland in northern Sydney and Aboriginal word for wallaby. North Head a headland at entrance to Sydney Harbour500 tons, 1954: 466 tons64.0 m1509, 1951: 1278Manly ferry, Binngarra type1985
Kameruka1913Sister to Kamiri. Built for Parramatta River run. Relatively high speed ferry, and thus used on Taronga Zoo and river runs.[65] Burnt out in 1918 and rebuilt. 1938 boiler crowns collapsed and was not returned to work until 1945. In 1954 was converted to diesel and given a more modern looking makeover.[72] One of the longest-lived Sydney Harbour ferries.Australian Aboriginal word meaning 'wait til I come'144 tons34.1 m594K class1984(?)
Lady Edeline1913Built by J Watson of Annandale. Similar to Lady Denman, Lady Chelmsford, Lady Scott, and Lady Ferguson. Part of the Balmain New Ferry Company fleet until that company's takeover by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1918.[42] Converted to diesel power in the 1936.[57] Re-engined 1963.[74] Laid up 1984, sank near Mortlake Punt 1988.[75]96 tons33.7 m544Lady class, third series1984
Karrabee1913Sister to Karingal. Original steam engines were sourced from Pheasant (1887), Sydney's first triple-expansion steam ferry.[14] These engines are now part of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences collection.[40] 1936 converted from steam to diesel-electric power, the first of the fleet converted. Used in 1966, along with Karingal, on a weekend and holiday service to Watsons Bay, however, the service ceased due to lack of passengers. 1984 sank at Circular Quay after competing in the annual Great Ferry Race. Raised two days later and laid up. 1986 sold and relocated to Gosford as floating restaurant. Sank at wharf in 2003 and broken up in 2005.Australian Aboriginal word for 'Cockatoo'107 tons32.8 m653K class1984
Karingal1913Sister to Karrabee. Her original steam engines came from Alathea when she was converted to a lighter.[31] Converted to diesel in 1937.[60] Re-engined 1961. Used in 1966, along with Karrabee, on a weekend and holiday service to Watsons Bay, however, the service ceased due to lack of passengers. Sank in Bass Strait en route to new owners in Melbourne in 1980s.Australian Aboriginal word meaning 'happy home'107 tons31.7 m608K class1984(?)
Woollahra1913Built for Watsons Bay-Manly service and uniquely had high wheelhouses and bulwarks to run across Sydney Heads, but the service was short lived. Part of the Watsons Bay and South Shore Ferry Company which was bought by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1920.[42][76] Used on other services after Vaucluse service was abandoned in 1933 due to competition from trams and private cars. Sold 1941.Australian Aboriginal word meaning 'camp', 'meeting ground' or a 'sitting down place' and the name of a Sydney suburb152 tons38.1 m1941
Kuramia1914Used by Royal Australian Navy in World War 2.[42] Hulk sunk as target of Sydney, 10 October 1953.335 tons47.7 m1357K class
Kedumba1914Vehicular ferry, similar to Killara (II). Redundant with the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, she sank sank of Narooma in January 1933 whilst being towed to Victoria.[42][64]Australian Aboriginal word for 'falling water'294 tons40.1 mVehicular ferry
Lady Scott, later John Cadman1914Built by J Dent of Jervis Bay. Similar to Lady Edeline, Lady Chelmsford, Lady Denman, and Lady Ferguson. Part of the Balmain New Ferry Company fleet until that company's takeover by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1918.[42] Converted to diesel power in the 1930s with a six-cylinder 190 hp Gardner diesel.[57][77] With hull in need of maintenance, she was sold in 1969 and used as cruise ferry. While tied up at Rodd Island, she caught fire and burnt to the waterline on 6 November 1972. With her hull still sound, superstructure was rebuilt with new appearance as John Cadman cruising restaurant.[43]95 tons33.5 m486Lady class, third series1969
Lady Ferguson1914Similar to Lady Edeline, Lady Chelmsford, Lady Scott, and Lady Denman. Part of the Balmain New Ferry Company fleet until that company's takeover by Sydney Ferries Ltd in 1918.[42] Converted to diesel power in the 1930s.[57] Re-engined 1956. Acting as a relief ferry since 1963, she was to set aside for disposal in 1974. Towed to Hobart in March 1975 as relief vessel after bridge collapse but could not be used due to poor condition. Broken up 1977.[43][74]Lady Helen Hermione, wife of Ronald Munro Ferguson, 1st Viscount Novar96 tons33.5 m490Lady class, third series1975
Kurnell, formerly Romantic1916Built for Cockatoo Island Dockyard run, 1924 sold to Sydney Ferries Ltd, 1925 to Newcastle, 1939 to Hegarty's ferries. Broken up 1974.[42]K class1942
Kooroongaba1921Vehicular ferry. Following opening of Sydney Harbour Bridge in 1932, used on the Hunter River between Newcastle and Stockton. Sank en route to Philippines 1972.[42]Australian Aboriginal word for 'pelican'313 tons41.8 m45 vehicles, 220 passengersVehicular ferry1932
Baragoola1922Steel screw steamer (later diesel). Sixth and final of the Binngarra class Manly ferry. Built by Morts Dock & Engineering. Almost identical sister ship to Binngarra (1905), Burra-bra (1908), Bellubera (1910), Balgowlah (1912), and Barrenjoey (1913 – later North Head).[61] 112 hp triple expansion steam engines by builder. 15 knots. Converted to diesel electric in 1961 - 4 x 7 cyclinder diesel generators, 2000 bhp driving 2 x electric engines: British Thompson-Houston Co.Ltd/English Electric Co.Ltd. 16 knots.Australian Aboriginal word for "Flood tide"[78]498 tons60.7 m1523Manly ferry, Binngarra type1983
Kuttabul1922Along with her sister, Koompartoo, she was the last of the K-class ferries and was one of the two biggest ferries owned by Sydney Ferries. With the largest passenger capacity of any Sydney ferry, both vessels built for the short heavy lift run from Circular Quay to Milsons Point. Originally certified for 1,505 passengers, they later carried up to 2,500 passengers, and regularly 2,000. Removed from service following opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. Due to their large size and relatively young age, other uses were found for them including cruises and to view harbour sailing events. Taken over by the Royal Australian Navy as an accommodation ship and moored on eastern shore of Garden Island. On 31 May 1942, sunk by Japanese torpedo with the loss of nineteen naval ratings (see Attack on Sydney Harbour). Naval base at Garden Island carries the name HMAS KuttabulAustralian Aboriginal word for 'wonderful'447 tons55.7 m2089K class1932
Koompartoo1922Along with sister Kuttabul, was one of the two biggest ferries owned by Sydney Ferries and the largest passenger capacity. Both vessels built for the short heavy lift run from Circular Quay to Milsons Point. Hull went to Tasmania 1966.Australian Aboriginal word meaning 'a fresh start'447 tons55.7 m2089K class1932(?)
Koondooloo1924Originally built as a vehicular punt, in 1937, following redundancy with the opening of the harbour bridge, she was converted to be Sydney's first specially built showboat. In September 1942, she was converted to Army repair craft S181 Koondooloo adding workshops and gun sponsons.[33] Later, reconverted to a vehicular ferry. Wrecked at Trial Bay in 1972 while under tow.[42]Australian Aboriginal word for 'emu'350 tons58.5 m56 vehicles, 292 passengersVehicular ferry
Kalang, later Sydney Queen1926Steel steam screw vehicular ferry. Sister to Kara Kara and similar to Koondooloo and the biggest car ferries to operate in Sydney. Built by J Chrichton & Co Ltd (Saltney, England. 148 hp triple expansion steam engine by Plenty & Sons Ltd. 13 knots. Made redundant with opening of Sydney Harbour Bridge. Used as cargo vessel 1932-1938. Converted to a three-deck showboat 1938. In October 1942, converted to AEME floating workshop (repair ship) Kalang AB97. Steamed up Australian east coast and across to Samarai. Operated as repair ship in Rabaul and Torokina.[79] Converted back to show boat in 1947/48. Not included in the 1951 government takeover of Sydney Ferries and continued to operate as a showboard. Rising costs and decreasing business and sold and laid in 1958. Renamed Sydney Queen in 1960 by new owners and painted white. Laid up in 1963 Wrecked at Trial Bay in 1972 while under tow to Manilla for use as a ferry/showboat.[42]Australian Aboriginal word meaning 'beautiful'35057.0 m50 vehicles, 250 passengers. 2,153 passengers as showboatVehicular ferry
Kara Kara1926Vehicular ferryAustralian Aboriginal word for the moon35057.0 mVehicular ferry
Curl Curl1928Along with Dee Why, one of two identical sister ships built for the Manly run. When introduced, the largest ferries on Sydney Harbour. Capable of 20 knots, possibly the fastest displacement hull ferry on Sydney Harbour. Laid up 1960, scuttled 1969.[80]A suburb in Sydney's northern beaches.790 tons67.1 m1574 (summer) / 1235 (winter)Manly ferry, Dee Why type1960
Dee Why1928Along with Curl Curl, one of two identical sister ships built for the Manly run. When introduced, the largest ferries on Sydney Harbour. Laid up 1968, scuttled 1976.[80]A suburb in Sydney's northern beaches.790 tons67.1 m1574 (summer) / 1235 (winter)Manly ferry, Dee Why type1968
South Steyne1938The largest and last steam ferry to operate on Sydney Harbour.[81] Built for the Manly run, she served until 1974. Damaged by fire 1974 while laid up, restored in the 1980s, used as a floating restaurant, and remains in existence.The southern promenade of Manly Beach1203 tons66.1 m1781Manly ferry1974
Rodney Regalia1938Capsized on 13 February 1938 due to overloading of the top deck with the loss of 19 lives. Refloated and renamed Regalia.
Kooleen1956New style, fully enclosed ferry. Originally intended to be the first of a series, she was immediately unpopular with passengers and no more were built.67 tons22.7 m2781985
Manly (III)1964Japanese built. The first hydrofoil service on Sydney Harbour31 tons20.7 m72Hydrofoil
Fairlight (II)1966Hydrofoil on Manly service65 tons29.0 m140Hydrofoil1984
Lady Cutler1968First of new generation of double-ended ferries. Followed two years later by the similar Lady Woodward and Lady Mckell.Helen Cutler, wife of Roden Cutler, Governor of NSW404 tons36.2 m570Lady-class ferry1991
Lady Woodward1970Identical sister to Lady Mckell and near identical sister to Lady Cutlerwife of Eric Woodward Governor of NSW339 tons36.2 m570Lady-class ferry
Lady Mckell1970Identical sister to Lady Woodward and near identical sister to Lady Cutler339 tons36.2 m570Lady-class ferry
Dee Why (II)1970Hydrofoil on Manly service65 tons29.0 m140Hydrofoil1985
Curl Curl (II)1973Hydrofoil on Manly service65 tons29.0 m140Hydrofoil
Lady Wakehurst1974Sister to Lady Northcott. Sent to Hobart to assist following 1975 Bridge collapse. Returned 1977. Used on Manly run in 1970s and 1980s until new Freshwater class ferries commissioned.wife of John Loder, 2nd Baron Wakehurst, former Governor of NSW366 tons38.9 m820Lady-class ferry
Lady Northcott1974(?)Sister to Lady Wakehurstwife of John Northcott former Governor of NSW366 tons38.9 m820Lady-class ferry2018(?)
Palm Beach1975Hydrofoil on Manly service65 tons29.0 m140Hydrofoil
Lady Street1979Sister to Lady Herron350 tons35.3 m554Lady-class ferry2002(?)
Lady Herron1979Sister to Lady Streetwife of Leslie Herron, Lieutenant Governor General of NSW350 tons35.3 m554Lady-class ferry2018(?)
Freshwater1982First of new class of Manly ferry.Freshwater Beach1150 tons70.4 m1100Freshwater classin service
Queenscliff1983Second of Freshwater class Manly ferry.Queenscliff Beach1140 tons70.4 m1150Freshwater classin service
Narrabeen (II)1984Third of Freshwater class Manly ferry.Narrabeen Beach1150 tons70.4 m1100Freshwater classin service
Sirius1984HMS Sirius, flagship of the 1787 First Fleet.105 tons25.4 m393First Fleetin service
Manly (IV)1984105 tons31.2 m235Hydrofoil1991
Sydney1985105 tons31.2 m235Hydrofoil1991
Supply1985HMS Supply, part of the 1787 First Fleet.105 tons25.4 m393First Fleetin service
Alexander1985105 tons25.4 m393First Fleetin service
Borrowdale1985Borrowdale, part of the 1787 First Fleet.105 tons25.4 m393First Fleetin service
Charlotte1985Charlotte, part of the 1787 First Fleet.105 tons25.4 m393First Fleetin service
Fishburn1985Fishburn, part of the 1787 First Fleet.105 tons25.4 m403First Fleetin service
Friendship1986Friendship, part of the 1787 First Fleet.105 tons25.4 m403First Fleetin service
Golden Grove1986Golden Grove, part of the 1787 First Fleet.105 tons25.4 m403First Fleetin service
Scarborough1986Scarborough, part of the 1787 First Fleet.105 tons25.4 m403First Fleetin service
Collaroy1988Fourth and final of Freshwater class ferry. First of its class to have open ends on upper deck. Preceding three Freshwater class ferries subsequently have the open upper deck retro-fitted.Collaroy Beach1140 tons70.4 m1150Freshwater classin service
Betty Cuthbert1992Athlete Betty Cuthbert41 tons36.8 m230RiverCatin service
Dawn Fraser1992Swimmer Dawn Fraser41 tons36.8 m230RiverCatin service
Evonne Goolagong1992Evonne Goolagong41 tons36.8 m230RiverCatin service
Marlene Mathews1992Marlene Matthews41 tons36.8 m230RiverCatin service
Marjorie Jackson1992Marjorie Jackson41 tons36.8 m230RiverCatin service
Nicole Livingstone1992Nicole Livingstone41 tons36.8 m230RiverCatin service
Shane Gould1992Shane Gould41 tons36.8 m230RiverCatin service
Anne Sargeant1998netballer Anne Sargeant35 tons29.6 m150HarbourCatin service
Pam Burridge1998surfer Anne Sargeant35 tons29.6 m150HarbourCatin service
Louise Sauvage2001Paralympian Louise Sauvage48 tons37.8 m250SuperCatin service
Mary MacKillop2001Australia's first declared saint Mary MacKillop48 tons37.8 m250SuperCatin service
Susie O’Neill2001swimmer Susie O'Neill48 tons37.8 m250SuperCatin service
SuperCat 42001-48 tons37.8 m250SuperCatin service
Fred Hollows2017Renowned ophthalmologist Fred Hollows40 tons36.4 m400Emerald classin service
Victor Chang2017Renowned cardiac surgeon Victor Chang40 tons36.4 m400Emerald classin service
Pemulwuy2017Aboriginal leader Pemulwuy40 tons36.4 m400Emerald classin service
Bungaree2017Fred Hollows40 tons36.4 m400Emerald classin service
May Gibbs2017Children's author May Gibbs40 tons36.4 m400Emerald classin service
Catherine Hamlin2017Obstetrician and gynaecologist Catherine Hamlin40 tons36.4 m400Emerald classin service
Me-Mel (II)2019Gadigal word meaning "eye" and name for Goat Island12 m43MiniCatin service

Notes

  1. Gunter (1978), p. 11
  2. Prescott (1984), p 11
  3. Andrews, Graeme (1982). A Pictorial History of Ferries: Sydney and Surrounding Waterways. Sydney: AH & AW Reed Pty Ltd. ISBN 0589503863.
  4. Andrews (1982), page 11
  5. Prescott (1984), p. 58
  6. Andrews (1975), p 115
  7. Gunter (1978), p. 12
  8. Gunter (1978), p. 28
  9. Andrews (1982), pp 11-12
  10. Gunter (1978), p 17
  11. Prescott (1984), p. 60
  12. Andrews (1975), p. 115
  13. Andrews (1982), p.12
  14. Gunter (1978), p. 14
  15. Prescott (1984), p. 66
  16. Gunter (1978), p. 71
  17. Andrews (1982), p. 51
  18. Gunter (1978), p. 23
  19. Precott (1984), p. 86
  20. Prescott (1984), p. 62
  21. Andrews (1982), p. 53
  22. Prescott (1984), p. 64
  23. Andrews (1982), p. 36
  24. Gunter (1978), p. 16
  25. Prescott (1984), p. 84
  26. Prescott (1984), p. 77
  27. Andrews (1982), p. 50
  28. Gunter (1978), pp 79-80
  29. Gunter (1978), p. 76
  30. Gunter (1978), p. 13
  31. Andrews (1975), p. 19
  32. Andrews (1982), p. 52
  33. Andrews (1982), p. 66
  34. Andrews (1982), p. 38
  35. Gunter (1978), p.72
  36. Prescott (1984), p. 85
  37. Gunter (1978), p. 33
  38. Prescott (1984), p 78
  39. Andrews (1982), p. 37
  40. Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences
  41. Andrews (1975), p. 30
  42. Gunter (1978), p 78
  43. Andrews (1982), p. 93
  44. Andrews, Graeme (1975). The Ferries of Sydney. A.H. & A.W. Reed Pty Ltd. p. 29. ISBN 0589071726.
  45. Gunter (1978), p 21
  46. Andrews, Graeme (1975). The Ferries of Sydney. A.H. & A.W. Reed Pty Ltd. p. 28. ISBN 0589071726.
  47. Andrews (1982), p. 40
  48. The Herald
  49. Andrews (1982), p. 94
  50. Prescott (1984), pp. 36, 67
  51. Andrews (1982), p. 100
  52. Gunter (1978), p. 34
  53. Prescott (1984), p. 35
  54. Gunter (1978), p. 36
  55. Gunter (1978), p. 73
  56. Prescott (1984), p. 74
  57. Prescott (1984), p. 30
  58. Prescott (1984), pp. 15-16
  59. Andrews (1982), p. 29
  60. Gunter (1978), p. 77
  61. Gunter (1978), p. 22
  62. Prescott (1984), p. 61
  63. Andrews (1982), p. 45
  64. Prescott (1984), p. 70
  65. Andrews (1982), p. 96
  66. Morcombe, John (26 May 2019). "The Bellubera Had It's Fair Share of Controversies During Its Time". The Manly Daily. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  67. Andrews (1982), p. 104
  68. "Vale Lady Chelmsford". Dockland News. Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  69. Andrews (1982), p. 97
  70. Prescott (1984), p. 71
  71. Andrews (1982), p. 98
  72. Prescott (1984), p. 37
  73. Gunter (1978), p. 57
  74. Prescott (1984), p. 73
  75. smh.com.au
  76. Andrews, Graeme (1975). The Ferries of Sydney. A.H. & A.W. Reed Pty Ltd. p. 31. ISBN 0589071726.
  77. Gunter (1978), p. 62
  78. savethebaragoola.com
  79. Andrews (1982), p. 65
  80. Prescott (1984), p. 63
  81. Gunter (1978), p. 74

References

  • Andrews, Graeme (1975). The Ferries of Sydney. A.H. & A.W. Reed Pty Ltd. ISBN 0589071726.
  • Andrews, Graeme (1982). A Pictorial History of Ferries: Sydney and Surrounding Waterways. Sydney: AH & AW Reed Pty Ltd. ISBN 0589503863.
  • Gunter, John (1978). Across the harbour : the story of Sydney's ferries. Rigby. ISBN 0727007157.
  • Prescott, AM (1984). Sydney Ferry Fleet. Magill South Australia: Ronald H Parsons. ISBN 0909418306.
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