List of Russian steam locomotive classes

This List of Russian steam locomotive classes includes those built both before and during the Soviet era. They are to the gauge of 5 ft (1,524 mm) unless otherwise stated. Some locomotives originally used in Poland during the period of the Russian Empire were built to 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge and later converted to 5 ft gauge. Class letters are shown in Cyrillic characters, followed by romanized characters in the next column. For more information, see Romanization of Russian. The main source for this list is Fleming and Price.[1]

Locomotive built before 1925

Class
(Cyrillic)
Class
(Romanized)
TypeManufacturerQuantityYears
built
NotesImage
Cherepanov locomotive. Yefim Alekseyevich and Miron Yefimovich Cherepanov 1833–1834 The first Russian-built steam locomotive. Track gauge was 5 ft 6 in (1,676 mm).[2]
Д D B1
1B
2′B
1856–1906 Class for various four-coupled locomotives
Т T C
1′C
1857-1915 Class for various six-coupled locomotives
Ъ " B2′
1′B1′
1′C1′
2′C
2′C1′
1′D1′
1864–1914 Class for various passenger tank locomotives
Ф F C′C′ n4t Avonside, Sharp, Stewart and Company, Yorkshire Engine Company, Kolomna 45 1872–1883 Fairlie locomotives
Ч Ch D Mal'cev, Kolomna, Briansk, Nevsky, Putilov, Kharkiv, Henschel & Sohn 1878–1911 Class for various eight-coupled locomotives
О O D n2v,
some also h2
Kolomna, Brjansk, Wotkinsk, Newski, Putilow, Sigl, StEG, Henschel, BMAG, Luhansk, Krasnoje Sormowo, Kharkiv 9129 1890–1928 osnownoi tip (basic type);
Variants with different valve gear and wheel diameters
П P 2′B n4v SACM, Belfort, South Eastern Railways' Odessa Works, Putilow, Kolomna 169 1891–1905 Four-cylinder tandem compound
Н N 1′C n2v,
some also h2, n2, and h2v
Alexandrow, Kolomna, Union, Brjansk, Luhansk, Krasnoje Sormowo, Newski, Putilow, Wotkinsk, Kharkiv 1082 1892–1914 [3] Variants with different valve gear and wheel diameters
А A 2′C n2v Kolomna, Hannover, Henschel, Krasnoje Sormowo, Luhansk, Kharkiv, Brjansk 533 1892–1907 Variants with different valve gear
ЕФ YeF 1′E n4v Baldwin 2 1895 Four-cylinder Vauclain compound
Х Kh 1′D n4v Baldwin 235 1895–1900 Four-cylinder Vauclain compound
В V 2′C n4v Baldwin 88 1895–1899 Four-cylinder Vauclain compound
Я Ya 1′C n2 Newski, Putilow 150 1896–1903
Ц Ts 1′D n2v Henschel, Hanomag, Brjansk, Fives-Lille, Société Franco-Belge, SACM-Mühlhausen, Kharkiv 214 1896–1904
Ж Zh 2′C n2v Henschel, Kolomna, Newski, Kharkiv 210 1896–1909
Р R 1′D n4v Brjansk, Putilow, SACM-Mühlhausen, Krasnoje Sormowo, Kolomna 477 1899–1911 Four-cylinder tandem compound
Ѳ Fita C′C n4v h4v Brjansk, Putilow, Kolomna 463 1899–1924 Mallet locomotives
Г G 2′C n2 Brjansk, Kharkiv 124 1901–1903
Ш Sh 1′D n2v Brjansk, Kharkiv 161 1901–1907
З Z 2′C h2 Kolomna 24 1902–1906
І I (1′B)B n4v Kolomna 112 1903–1905 [4] Mallet locomotives
У U 2′C n4v Putilow 56 1906–1910
Щ Shch 1′D n2v, h2 and h2v Kharkiv, Brjansk, Luhansk, Newski, Putilow, Krasnoje Sormowo, Kolomna 2028 1906–1924 Variants with different wheel diameter
Б B 2′C h2 Brjansk, Luhansk 252 1907–1914
К K 2′C h2 Kolomna, Putilow, Moskau-Kasaner railway workshops 145 1907–1912
Ѵ Izhitsa D h2 Kolomna, Brjansk 56 1908–1918
И I 1′D h2 Kolomna 19 1909–1910
С S 1′C1 h2 Krasnoje Sormowo, Luhansk, Kharkiv, Newski 678 1910–1919
Ы Y D n2v, h2v and h2 Kolomna, Wotkinsk 372 1910–1920
КУ KU 2′C h2 Kolomna 39 1911–1914 K usilenny (larger K)
УУ UU 2′C h4v Putilow 6 1912 U usilenny (larger U)
Э E E h2 Luhansk, Krasnoje Sormowo, Kharkiv, Kolomna, Brjansk, Newski 1528 1912–1925
ѴС
originally ЧВПс
YS
originally ChVPs
D h2 Krasnoje Sormowo 27 1914–1915 as Standard gauge for the Warsaw–Vienna line.
СВ SV 1′C1′ h2 Kolomna 15 1914–1915 Built to standard gauge for Warsaw-Vienna line in 1915. Later converted to 5 ft gauge for Moscow-Kursk line.[5]
Л
from
1947:
ЛП
L
from
1947:>br>LP
2′C1′ h4 Putilow 66 1914–1926
ЕС YeS 1′E h2 ALCO 106 1915–1916 [6] S for Schenectady
ЕФ YeF 1′E h2 Baldwin 242 1915 F for Philadelphia;
250 shipped, 8 lost at sea
ЕК YeK 1′E h2 CLC 50 1915–1916 K for Kingston
ЕЛ YeL 1′E h2 ALCO, Baldwin al least 554 1916–1919 L for chief engineer A. I. Lipez
ЭШ ESh E h2 NoHAB 500 1920–1924 Two with Uniflow steam engine designated ЭМШ (EMSh)
ЭГ EG E h2 AEG, Borsig, Hanomag, SMF, Henschel, Hohenzollern, Humboldt, Jung, Karlsruhe, Krauss, Krupp, LHW, O&K, Rheinmetall, BMAG, Vulcan, Wolf, Maffei, Esslingen 700 1921–1923 1 rebuilt to condensing locomotive in 1933 and designated ЭГК (EGK)
ХМ KhM 1′D
Ф F 1′E État Belge type 36
Ь ' B
B1
1B
C
C1′
C2′
D
1′E1′
to 1957 Class for various goods tank locomotives

Locomotives built after 1925

Class
(Cyrillic)
Class
(Romanized)
TypeManufacturerQuantityYears
built
NotesImage
СУ SU 1′C1′ h2 Brjansk, Krasnoje Sormowo, Kolomna, Luhansk, Charkow 2270 1925–1941 36 with higher axleload designated СУТ (SUT);
210 with draught fan designated СУМ (SUM)
Krasnoje Sormowo 411 1947–1951 2 with mechanical stokers designated СУР (SUR)
М M 2′D h3 Luhansk, Putilow 100 1926–1930 Rebuilt from 1932 as 2-cylinder designated МР (MR)
ЭУ EU E h2 Kolomna, Luhansk, Krasnoje Sormowo, Brjansk, Charkow 2535 1926–1931
Та Ta 1′E2′ h2 ALCO 5 1931 Experimental locomotives
Тб Tb 1′E1′ h2 Baldwin 5 1931 Experimental locomotives
ФД20 FD20 1′E1′ h2 Voroshilovgrad 2927 1931–1940 [7] FD after Felix Dzerzhinsky;
2 Condensing locomotives designated ФДК (FDK)
ИС20
from 1962: ФДП20
IS20
from 1962: FDP20
1'D2' h2 Kolomna, Voroshilovgrad 638 1932–1941 IS after Joseph Stalin
ЭМ EM E h2 Voroshilovgrad, Krasnoje Sormowo, Brjansk, Charkow 2325 1932–1935 18 converted to Condensing locomotives and designated ЭМК (EMK) between 1937 and 1940
Я Ya 2′D1′+1′D2′ h2 Beyer, Peacock & Co. 1 1932 [8] Experimental Garratt locomotive – the biggest Garratt locomotive ever built.
ЭР ER E h2 Murom workshops (1) (1933) [9] Rebuilt from ЭМ (EM)
Voroshilovgrad, Brjansk 305 1934–1936
Kolomna 22 1943–1944
Reșița, MÁVAG, Malaxa, ČKD, Cegielski, Škoda 2716 1946–1955
АА20 AA20 2′G2′ h2 Voroshilovgrad 1 1934 Experimental locomotive;
AA after Andrey Andreyevich Andreyev
СО17 SO17 1′E h2 Charkow, Brjansk, Ulan-Ude, Krasnojarsk, Voroshilovgrad 2523 1934–1951 SO after Grigory (Sergo) Ordzhonikidze;
2 condensing locomotives designated СОК (SOK)
9P C t Kolomna, Novocherkassk, Murom workshops 2688 1935–1957
м 9P C t Murom workshops 500 1955–1957
CO19
also СОК
SO19
also SOK
1′E h2 Charkow, Brjansk, Ulan-Ude, Voroshilovgrad 1436 1936–1942 Condensing locomotives
В5 V5 B′2′ h2 Kolomna 1 1937 Experimental locomotive with high pressure boiler
2-3-2К 2-3-2K 2′C2′ h2 Kolomna 2 1937–1938 Experimental locomotives
2-3-2В 2-3-2V 2′C2′ h2 Voroshilovgrad 1 1938 Experimental locomotive
СО18
also СОВ
SO18
also SOV
1′E h2 Charkow, Brjansk, Voroshilovgrad 489 1939–1946
ФД21 FD21 1′E1′ h2 Voroshilovgrad, Ulan-Ude 286 1940–1942 as ФД20 (FD20), with 21 t axleload
ИС21
from 1962:
ФДП21
IS21
from 1962:
FDP21
1′D2′ h2 Voroshilovgrad 11 1941–1942 as ИС20 (IS20), but with 21 t axleload
TE 1'E h2 Various ~2700 1942-1945 Captured Deutsche Reichsbahn Kriegsloks. Some standard gauge, used in the Baltic and border republics. 100 transferred to Hungarian State Railways in 1963.
ФДР18 FDR18 1′E2′ h2 Ulan-Ude (85) (1943–1944) Converted from ФД (FD); 18 t axleload;
ШA ShA 1′D h2 ALCO, Baldwin 194 1943 USATC S160 Class;
200 shipped, 6 lost at sea
ЕА YeA 1′E h2 ALCO, Baldwin 1622 1944–1946
ЕМ YeM 1′E h2 Baldwin 425 1944–1947 13 with feedwater heater ЕМВ (EMV)
Л
originally
П
L
originally
P
1′E h2 Kolomna, Voroshilovgrad, Brjansk 4199 1945–1955
23
also УУ
23
also UU
1′E2′ h2 Ulan-Ude 1 1949 Experimental locomotive
ОР23 OR23 1′E2′ h4 Voroshilovgrad 1 1949 Experimental locomotive
П34 P34 (1′C)C1′ h4 Kolomna 1 1949 Experimental Mallet locomotive
П36 P36 2′D2′ h2 Kolomna 251 1950–1956
ЛК LK 1′E h2 Voroschilovgrad 1 1951 Experimental locomotive
ЛВ
originally
ОР18
LV
originally
OR18
1′E1′ h2 Voroschilovgrad 522 1952–1956
ОР21 OR21 1′E1′ h2 Voroschilovgrad 3 1953–1954 Experimental locomotives
П38 P38 (1′D)D2′ h4 Kolomna 4 1954–1955 Experimental Mallet locomotive

Captured locomotives

Class
(Cyrillic)
Class
(Romanized)
TypeManufacturerQuantityYears
built
NotesImage

Locomotive builders

Reference[10]

See also

References

  • Le Fleming, H. M. & Price, J.H. (1960). Russian Steam Locomotives,. London: John Marshbank Ltd.
  1. Le Fleming, H.M. and Price, J.H. Russian Steam Locomotives, John Marshbank Ltd, London, 1960
  2. Fleming & Price 1960, p. 23. These are the figures quoted in the reference, although 1670 mm is actually 5 ft 5¾ in.
  3. Fleming & Price 1960, p. 27
  4. Fleming & Price 1960, p. 29
  5. Fleming and Price p 32
  6. Fleming and Price pp 41-42
  7. Fleming & Price 1960, pp. 53–55
  8. Fleming & Price 1960, p. 53
  9. Fleming & Price 1960, pp. 48–49
  10. Fleming and Price pp 105-107
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.