List of Great Lakes shipwrecks on the National Register of Historic Places

This is a list of shipwrecks on the Great Lakes of North America that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The locations of National Register properties for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below, may be seen in an online map.[1] This list includes shipwrecks that are located in the waters of Lake Superior, Lake Huron, Lake Michigan, Lake Erie and Lake Ontario.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted December 6, 2019.

Lake Superior

[2] Name on the Register[3] Image Date listed[4] Location City or town Description
1 Algoma June 14, 1984
(#84001699)
Southeast shore of Mott Island[5]
48°06′41″N 88°31′55″W
Isle Royale National Park The Algoma was a passenger steamer built in 1883. In November 1885, it ran into a blinding snowstorm, veered off course, and ran aground near Isle Royale. As the storm continued to rage, the ship came apart, eventually killing 46 people. The wreck of the Algoma was the worst loss of life in the history of Lake Superior shipping.[6]
2 Amboy and George Spencer Shipwreck Sites April 14, 1994
(#94000341)
Lake Superior shore about a mile southwest of Sugar Loaf Cove[7]
47°28′41″N 90°59′59″W
Schroeder vicinity Remains of an 1884 wooden bulk freighter and its 1874 schooner-barge consort, associated with the nationally significant Great Lakes iron ore trade and the infamous 1905 Mataafa Storm that sank them.[7]
3 America June 14, 1984
(#84001708)
North Gap of Washington Harbor[5]
47°53′39″N 89°13′15″W
Isle Royale National Park The America served as a communications link for the communities of western Lake Superior in the early 20th century. Beginning in 1902, she ran three voyages per week among Duluth, Minnesota, Isle Royale, and Thunder Bay, Ontario, as well as numerous small communities in between. In June 1928, the America ran aground while leaving Washington Harbor, and efforts to salvage her were unsuccessful. The ship can be seen from the surface, with her bow in only two feet of water.[8]
4 Antelope (schooner-barge) Shipwreck June 22, 2018
(#100002610)
7.5 miles (12.1 km) SE of Michigan Island in L. Superior
46°49′08″N 90°27′14″W
La Pointe vicinity 187-foot wood-hulled steamship built in 1861 that initially hauled passengers. Later converted to a schooner. Sank in 1897 carrying 1,000 tons of coal while being towed from the Ashland ore docks toward Duluth.[9]
5 Benjamin Noble (Shipwreck) September 20, 2007
(#07000984)
Mid-Lake off Knife River
46°56′00″N 91°40′00″W
Knife River vicinity The SS Benjamin Noble was a steel hulled package freighter package freighter built in 1909, that went down with all hands in 1914, in mid-lake off Knife River, Minnesota. Her wreck was found half buried in 2004, in 365-feet of water.[10][11]
6 BIG BAY SLOOP shipwreck (sloop) January 14, 2009
(#08001327)
Off the coast of Madeline Island, east of Big Bay State Park[12][13]
46°48′31″N 90°38′44″W
La Pointe Remains of an unidentified small sloop, probably built around 1880, lying under 25 feet of water.[14]
7 Chester A. Congdon June 14, 1984
(#84001716)
Congdon Shoals on northeast end of Isle Royale[5]
48°11′36″N 88°30′52″W
Isle Royale National Park Originally named the Salt Lake City, when constructed in 1907, the bulk steel freighter sank near Isle Royale in Lake Superior in 1918. It was the first wreck in Lake Superior to be valued at over one million dollars.[15]
8 Cumberland June 14, 1984
(#84001732)
Near Rock of Ages Light[5]
47°51′28″N 89°19′39″W
Isle Royale National Park The Cumberland was a wooden-hulled side paddlewheeler built in 1871. In July 1877, she began taking on water after leaving Thunder Bay, and struck a reef near the Rock of Ages Light. The day was clear and dry, and passengers and crew were removed without difficulty. The wreckage of the Cumberland is intermingled with some portions of the hull of the Henry Chisholm, which sank later in 1898.[16]
9 Emperor June 14, 1984
(#84001748)
North side of Canoe Rocks, on the northeast end of Isle Royale[5]
48°12′02″N 88°29′30″W
Isle Royale National Park The Emperor was a freighter constructed in 1910, and at 525 feet in length, it was the largest Canadian-built freighter ever built at the time of her launching. In June 1947, the Emperor left Thunder Bay, laden with 10,429 tons of iron ore. Her course was miscalculated, and the ship ran aground at 4:15 in the morning on the north side of Canoe Rocks. The Emperor sank within 30 minutes, killing twelve crewmembers.[17]
10 George M. Cox June 14, 1984
(#84001749)
Near Rock of Ages Light[5]
47°51′28″N 89°19′23″W
Isle Royale National Park The Cox was launched in 1901 as the USS Puritan, a civilian transport ship. It was used by the US Navy in World War I, but returned to civilian service afterward. It sank in 1933 near the Rock of Ages Light off Isle Royale in Lake Superior.[18]
11 Glenlyon June 14, 1984
(#84001750)
Glenlyon Shoals off Menagerie Island in Siskiwit Bay[5]
47°57′08″N 88°44′53″W
Isle Royale National Park The Glenlyon was a freighter built in 1893. Over its career, it was owned by many companies, and hauled both package freight and bulk cargo, as well as, for a short time, passengers for both U.S. and Canada. The ship ran aground on November 1, 1924, while heading for shelter in Siskiwit Bay.[19]
12 Harriet B. (shipwreck) August 9, 2018
(#100002773)
Four miles off Two Harbors
46°58′00″N 91°42′00″W
Two Harbors vicinity Wooden barge that started life in 1895 as the wooden ferry Shenango No.2. Cut down to bulk freighter in 1918, and reduced to a barge in 1921. Sunk by the freighter Quincy A. Shaw in 1922. She lies in 656 feet of water, and is Minnesota's most intact shipwreck.[20][21]
13 Henry Chisholm June 14, 1984
(#84001752)
Near Rock of Ages Light[5]
47°51′28″N 89°19′41″W
Isle Royale National Park The Henry Chisholm was a wooden freighter built in 1880, and was the largest wooden "steam barge" ever built in Cleveland, approaching the practical size limit for a wooden vessel of its type. In October 1898, the Chisholm left Duluth, Minnesota, towing the 220-foot schooner John Martin. A storm blew up and the Martin was cast off. After the gale lessened, the Chisholm spent the next few days searching for the Martin, and struck a reef near the Rock of Ages Light while attempting to enter Washington Harbor. Portions of the Chisholm's hull are intermingled with the wreckage of the SS Cumberland, which had sunk earlier in 1877.[22]
14 Hesper Shipwreck Site April 14, 1994
(#94000343)
Along the west breakwall in Silver Bay Harbor.[23]
47°16′17″N 91°16′18″W
Silver Bay vicinity Well-preserved wreck of a bulk freight steamship, associated with the Great Lakes iron-ore and grain trades. Launched in 1890 and sunk in a 1905 spring storm.[24]
15 Kamloops June 14, 1984
(#84001769)
Kamloops Point[5]
48°05′06″N 88°45′53″W
Isle Royale National Park The SS Kamloops was a lake freighter that was part of the fleet of Canada Steamship Lines from its launching in 1924 until it sank with all hands off Isle Royale in Lake Superior on or about 7 December 1927.[25]
16 LUCERNE (Shipwreck) December 18, 1991
(#91001775)
Off northeast shore of Long Island[23]
46°43′23″N 90°46′02″W
La Pointe 195 foot three-masted schooner built in 1873. On her last voyage in November 1886, dropped coal in Washburn, loaded 1256 tons of Gogebic iron ore at Ashland, and left for Cleveland. She sank in a snowstorm, with all crew lost.[26][27]
17 Madeira (Schooner-Barge) Shipwreck July 23, 1992
(#92000843)
Near the base of Gold Rock[23]
47°12′22″N 91°21′29″W
Beaver Bay vicinity Only known remains of a schooner-barge, a little-known ship type with sails to aid its tow vessel. Launched in 1900 and wrecked during the infamous Mataafa Storm of 1905, prompting construction of the Split Rock Lighthouse nearby.[28]
18 MARQUETTE (shipwreck) February 13, 2008
(#08000027)
5 miles (8.0 km) east of Michigan Island, Lake Superior
46°50′02″N 90°25′47″W
La Pointe 235 foot wooden bulk freighter built in 1881 in Cleveland. On Oct 15, 1903, heading east with iron ore in fair weather, she sprang a leak and sank. The crew escaped.[29]
19 Mayflower (shipwreck) August 28, 2012
(#12000560)
2.25 miles south of Lester River in Lake Superior
46°48′12″N 92°00′40″W
Lester Park vicinity Wreck of an 1887 scow schooner lost in 1891, an important example of a fairly common but little documented type of Great Lakes merchant vessel.[30]
20 Monarch June 14, 1984
(#84001779)
Palisade area on the north side of Blake Point[5]
48°11′20″N 88°26′03″W
Isle Royale National Park The Monarch was a passenger-package freighter built in 1890. In December 1906, the departed Thunder Bay for Sarnia in a blinding snowstorm. For some reason, the ship headed off its planned course, and that night it rammed at full speed into the palisade area on the north side of Blake Point on Isle Roayale. Miraculously, all but one of the crew and passengers were able to make it to shore.[31]
21 MOONLIGHT shipwreck October 1, 2008
(#08000979)
7 miles (11 km) east of Michigan Island
46°49′56″N 90°22′42″W
La Pointe vicinity Graceful sailing schooner built in 1874 by Wolf & Davidson in Milwaukee. Her topmasts were removed in 1889 when she was converted to a barge. Sank in a storm in September 1903 while being towed with a load of iron ore out of Ashland.[32]
22 Niagara Shipwreck Site April 14, 1994
(#94000344)
500 feet (150 m) south of Knife Island[23]
46°56′45″N 91°46′16″W
Knife River vicinity Rare, early remnants of a class of large tugboats built for timber rafting on the Great Lakes. Launched in 1872 and sank in 1904 after running aground.[33]
23 NOQUEBAY (Schooner-Barge) Shipwreck Site June 4, 1992
(#92000593)
Off Stockton Island, in Julian Bay
46°55′45″N 90°32′39″W
La Pointe 205 foot schooner-barge built in 1872 in Trenton, Michigan. On October 6, 1905 it was loaded with 600,000 board feet of hemlock lumber and being towed toward Bay City, Michigan when she caught fire and eventually sank.[34]
24 Onoko (Bulk Freight Steamer) Shipwreck July 23, 1992
(#92000845)
6 miles south Knife River
46°50′46″N 91°46′38″W
Knife River vicinity 1882 iron-hulled steamship, prototype of the large Great Lakes bulk freighters that became critical to the steel industry. Sprang a leak and sank in 1915.[35]
25 OTTAWA (Tug) Shipwreck Site June 8, 1992
(#92000594)
Northern edge of Red Cliff Bay
46°53′08″N 90°45′39″W
Russell 151 foot tugboat built in Chicago in 1881 that first towed rafts of logs across Lake Michigan. In November 1909, after helping free a grounded steamship, she mysteriously caught fire in the night, burned and sank.[36]
26 PRETORIA (schooner-barge) Shipwreck Site August 17, 1994
(#94000835)
One mile northeast of Outer Island.[23]
47°05′22″N 90°23′40″W
Bayfield Huge 338 foot schooner-barge built in 1900 in West Bay City, Michigan. On Sept. 1, 1905 she left Superior with a load of iron ore, towed by a steamer heading for Chicago. They were caught by the same storm that sank the Sevona, and the Pretoria sank with 5 crew lost.[37]
27 R.G. Stewart (shipwreck) December 27, 1991
(#91001850)
Off the southeast shore of Michigan Island
46°52′24″N 90°28′30″W
La Pointe 100 foot wooden passenger steamer built in 1878 in Buffalo.[38] On June 4, 1899 she ran off course in a fog and ran aground on Michigan Island, then caught fire. One crewman died.[39]
28 Robert Wallace (bulk carrier) shipwreck site October 14, 2009
(#09000828)
7 miles south of Knife River.[40] Part of the Minnesota's Lake Superior Shipwrecks MPS.
46°50′50″N 91°43′44″W
Palmers Largely untouched wreck of an 1882 iron-reinforced wooden steam barge sunk in 1902, with significant research potential on the formative design and shipboard life of the first lake freighters.[41][42]
29 Samuel P. Ely Shipwreck June 18, 1992
(#92000694)
Along Two Harbors' west breakwall[23]
47°00′42″N 91°40′40″W
Two Harbors vicinity Lake Superior's best remnant of the large ore schooners introduced around 1870, and a key part of local nautical lore for wrecking against the Two Harbors breakwater followed by the dramatic rescue of all hands in an 1896 storm.[43]
30 SEVONA (Bulk Carrier) Shipwreck Site April 9, 1993
(#93000229)
North of Sand Island
47°00′24″N 90°54′32″W
Bayfield 372 foot steel steamer, built 1890 in Bay City, Michigan. Caught by a nor-easter on Sept 2, 1905, running from West Superior for Erie with 6000 tons of iron ore. Tried to shelter in Apostle Islands but ran aground on shoals north of Sand Island. Seven died - 16 escaped in lifeboats.[44]
31 Thomas Wilson (Whaleback Freighter) Shipwreck July 23, 1992
(#92000844)
7/8 of a mile outside the Duluth Harbor entrance.[23]
46°47′00″N 92°04′10″W
Duluth vicinity 1892 freight steamer sunk in a collision just outside Duluth Harbor in 1902, prompting operational reforms. Wreck is one of the best surviving examples of whaleback design.[45]
32 T.H. Camp (shipwreck) September 15, 2004
(#04001001)
Between Madeline Island and Basswood Island
46°49′00″N 90°45′00″W
La Pointe Steam-powered tugboat built in 1876. Served as a "purchase boat," collecting catch from remote fish camps as far away as Isle Royale or Canada. Sank in 1900.[46]
33 THOMAS FRIANT shipwreck (gill net tug) November 18, 2019
(#100004627)
13 miles (21 km) southeast of Two Harbors, Minnesota
46°52′00″N 91°29′00″W
Port Wing vicinity Built in 1884 by Duncan Robertson in Grand Haven, the 96-foot wooden steam screw initially operated as a ferry on the Grand River before moving out to Lake Michigan. In 1908 she burned to the waterline in Sault Ste. Marie. Rebuilt as a fish tug in 1911. Sank off Two Harbors in January 1924, damaged by ice. She currently lies in 305-feet of water.[47][48]
34 USS Essex Shipwreck Site April 14, 1994
(#94000342)
Lake Superior
46°42′46″N 92°01′43″W
Duluth Remains of a U.S Navy steam sloop active 1876–1903, scrapped and burned to the waterline in 1931. Only surviving remnants of a vessel by influential shipbuilder Donald McKay.[49]

Lake Huron

[2] Name on the Register Image Date listed[4] Location City or town Description
1 CHOCTAW (shipwreck) December 10, 2018
(#100003214)
Lake Huron, approximately five miles east of Presque Isle Light
45°32′02″N 83°30′33″W
Presque Isle The Choctaw was a semi-whaleback ship (one of three built) that sank on Lake Huron in 1915 following a collision with the Canadian package freighter Wahcondah. After several unsuccessful searches, she was discovered in 2017, along with the wooden steamer Ohio. She currently lies in almost 300 feet of water.[50]
2 F.T. Barney Shipwreck August 19, 1991
(#91001016)
Lake Huron[51]
45°29′09″N 83°50′33″W
Rogers City The F.T. Barney was a schooner built in 1856. It sank in 1868 in a collision with another schooner; the wreck lay undiscovered until 1987. It is in 160 feet of water, and is one of the most complete of a schooner of its era.[52]
3 Grecian Shipwreck Site February 8, 2018
(#100001835)
L. Huron
44°58′07″N 83°12′03″W
Alpena The Grecian was built in 1891 by the Globe Iron Works in Cleveland, Ohio. She was one of the first propeller-driven steel lakers that hauled iron and coal on the Great Lakes. She sank in 1906 after striking a rock.[53]
4 Joseph S. Fay Shipwreck Site February 8, 2018
(#100001838)
Off of Forty Mile Point Lighthouse in L. Huron
45°29′19″N 83°54′36″W
Rogers City vicinity Wooden lake freighter built in 1871 ran aground in 1905 near the 40 Mile Point Light Station. Some of her lower hull remains in the water, while 150-feet of her starboard side is on the beach.[54]
5 KYLE SPANGLER (schooner) Shipwreck Site August 22, 2016
(#14001098)
Lake Huron, 4 miles (6.4 km) northeast of Presque Isle[55]
45°23′01″N 83°26′07″W
Presque Isle Township The Kyle Spangler was a wooden schooner built in 1856. She sank in 1860 after a collision with another schooner; the wreck is remarkably undamaged.[56]
6 NORMAN (shipwreck) November 22, 2016
(#16000819)
Lake Huron, 10.35 miles (16.66 km) east-southeast of Presque Isle Museum
45°18′42″N 83°16′44″W
Presque Isle Township The Norman was built in 1890 by the Globe Iron Works in Cleveland, Ohio. She was one of the first propeller-driven steel lakers that hauled iron and coal on the Great Lakes. On May 30, 1895, the Norman and the steamer Jack collided in the fog. She currently lies in 210 feet of water. Her wreck sits near the wreck of the wooden freighter Florida.[57][58]
7 Pewabic (propeller) Shipwreck Site August 22, 2016
(#14001096)
Lake Huron[59]
44°57′53″N 83°06′14″W
Alpena Township The SS Pewabic was a package freighter that served ports on the Upper Great Lakes. She was launched in October 1863, fitted out in the spring of 1864, and was in active service until she sank off Thunder Bay Island in Lake Huron on August 9, 1865, due to collision with her sister vessel.[60]
8 SPORT (tug) Shipwreck Site October 29, 1992
(#92001503)
Three miles off the coast of Lexington[61]
43°16′00″N 82°27′54″W
Lexington The first steel tug on the Great Lakes, and the first vessel made of Bessemer steel in North America. Built in 1873 and sank in 1920.[62]

Lake Michigan

[2] Name on the Register Image Date listed[4] Location City or town Description
1 ADVANCE shipwreck (Barge) June 10, 2019
(#100004024)
0.1 miles (0.16 km) E of Sand Bay Peninsula, Sand Bay, in Lake Michigan
44°51′48″N 87°29′49″W
Nasewaupee vicinity 139-foot 2-masted wooden schooner-barge built in 1871 by Alvin A. Turner in Trenton, Michigan. Hauled lumber from Peshtigo to Chicago, then in 1898 started hauling stone. In 1921, while off-loading 7,000 tons of coal from a stranded steamer, she was caught by the wind and sank.[63][64]
2 Alaska Shipwreck (Scow Schooner) January 17, 2017
(#100000518)
4.2 miles (6.8 km) NE of Two Rivers, in Lake Michigan
44°10′08″N 87°28′12″W
Two Rivers 90-foot wooden scow-schooner built by Smith Neville, Sr. in Sheboygan in 1869. Mainly hauled lumber on Lake Michigan. Pushed ashore by a gale March 23, 1879, while carrying wheat to Ahnapee her remains now lie in 5 feet of water.[65]
3 AMERICA Shipwreck (Canaller) July 3, 2013
(#13000467)
Four miles offshore in Lake Michigan
44°21′01″N 87°24′56″W
Carlton 137-foot three-masted canaller (schooner built specifically to squeeze through the Welland Canal), built in 1873. She hauled grain and lumber east as far as New York state, and brought back coal. Sank in 1880 after hitting a scow full of stones.[66]
4 APPOMATTOX (shipwreck) January 20, 2005
(#04001547)
Off Atwater Beach
Boundary increase (listed September 15, 2011): 150 yrds. off Atwater Beach

43°05′37″N 87°51′58″W
Shorewood 330-foot wooden steam freighter, built in 1896 by James Davidson. One of the largest wooden ships ever built, she mostly carried iron ore east on the Great Lakes and returned with coal. Ran aground in a fog bank in November 1905.[67] Part of the Great Lakes Shipwreck Sites of Wisconsin MPS; boundary enlarged November 16, 2015.
5 Arctic (tug) Shipwreck June 22, 2018
(#100002612)
1.5 miles (2.4 km) NE of the Manitowoc Breakwater Light, in Lake Michigan
44°06′51″N 87°37′52″W
Manitowoc vicinity 76.5 foot harbor tug, built in 1881 by Rand and Burger of Manitowoc with a wooden hull and a steam-screw drive. Escorted Goodrich steamers and other vessels around Manitowoc, Milwaukee and Chicago harbors for 49 years. Then stripped and abandoned in 1930.[68][69]
6 Atlanta (steam screw) Shipwreck November 6, 2017
(#100001785)
1.02 mi. NNE. of Amsterdam Park boat launch in L. Michigan
43°34′15″N 87°46′58″W
Cedar Grove vicinity 200-foot screw steamer built in 1891 by the Cleveland Dry Dock Company for Goodrich Transport. Served as a packet boat, transporting passengers and freight around Lake Michigan. Caught fire March 18, 1906 heading from Sheboygan to Milwaukee, and abandoned, with one man lost.[70][71]
7 AUSTRALASIA (wooden bulk carrier) Shipwreck July 3, 2013
(#13000466)
820 feet southeast of Whitefish Dunes State Park in Lake Michigan
44°55′20″N 87°11′13″W
Sevastopol 285-foot bulk carrier built in 1884 in Bay City, the largest wooden ship ever built at that time. She hauled salt, wheat, etc from Duluth to Buffalo to Cleveland. On Oct 10, 1896, heading for Milwaukee carrying 2,200 tons of coal, she caught fire off Baileys Harbor and the crew scuttled her in shallow water.[72][73]
8 Bullhead Point Historical and Archeological District March 26, 2003
(#03000167)
N. Duluth Ave.
44°50′37″N 87°23′43″W
Sturgeon Bay Remains of three ships visible in shallow water from shore. All hauled limestone for the Sturgeon Bay Stone Company at the ends of their lives and were burned in 1931. They are the 212-foot steamer Empire State built in 1862, the 134-foot centerboard schooner Oak Leaf, and the 168-foot schooner-barge Ida Corning.[74]
9 Byron (schooner) Shipwreck May 20, 2009
(#09000368)
Off Oostburg in Lake Michigan
43°36′17″N 87°41′17″W
Oostburg 36-foot wooden schooner - probably the Byron, which was built around 1849 for William Burmeister and hauled lumber and merchandise around Lake Michigan. It sank in 1867 carrying merchandise for two stores in Manitowoc, after colliding with a larger ship.[75][76]
10 Christina Nilsson (shipwreck) July 17, 2003
(#03000668)
Baileys Harbor
45°03′23″N 87°05′52″W
Baileys Harbor 139-foot schooner built by Hanson & Scove in Manitowoc in 1871 and named for a Swedish diva. In October 1884, hauling 575 tons of pig iron to Chicago, she was driven by a gale onto a reef and wrecked.[77]
11 Claflin Point Site January 18, 2000
(#99001660)
Off the coast of Claflin Point
44°50′46″N 87°33′00″W
Gardner Wreck of a 170-foot wooden vessel next to remains of a crib-and-stone pier in Little Sturgeon Bay, lost under murky circumstances around 1898. It is believed to be the remains of the Puritan, a once-fast steamship reduced after burning to a barge for hauling limestone. A.k.a. Claflin Point.[78]
12 CONTINENTAL shipwreck (bulk carrier) January 14, 2009
(#08001330)
One mile north of Rawley Point[23]
44°13′50″N 87°30′31″W
Two Rivers This 244-foot wood-hulled steam screw bulk carrier was built 1882 in Cleveland. She hauled iron and coal until December of 1904, when in a snowstorm she ran onto a sandbar off Rawley Point, while trying to reach dry dock in Manitowoc for the winter.[79]
13 DANIEL LYONS (Shipwreck) October 3, 2007
(#07001048)
E of Stoney Cr. outlet, 4 mi (6.4 km). offshore
44°40′21″N 87°17′43″W
Lake Michigan Three-masted schooner built in 1873. Sank in 1878 after being hit by another schooner, on a run from Chicago to New York.[80]
14 EMBA Shipwreck (Self-Unloading Barge) July 3, 2013
(#13000468)
5 miles East of North Point in Lake Michigan
43°03′54″N 87°44′59″W
Lake Michigan 181-foot schooner-barge built in 1890 by Frank Wheeler Company of West Bay City. Hauled bulk coal, grain and lumber around Lake Michigan as a tow-barge. Converted to a self-unloader in 1923 to haul coal, and renamed for Employes' Mutual Benefit Association. Scuttled in 1933, considered obsolete.[81][82]
15 FLEETWING (shipwreck) July 11, 2001
(#01000734)
Garrett Bay[23]
45°17′15″N 87°02′59″W
Liberty Grove 132-foot two-masted schooner built in 1867 in Manitowoc by Henry Burger. Carried grain, coal and lumber from Chicago to Buffalo. On Sept 26, 1888, heading from Menominee toward Chicago in a gale, she tried to pass through Death's Door, but ran off course and grounded.[83]
16 Floretta (canaller) Shipwreck October 20, 2014
(#14000877)
11 mi. SE. of Manitowoc
43°57′14″N 87°32′12″W
Centerville Built in 1867 and sized to carry a maximum load through the Welland Canal locks, the Floretta carried grain and ore up and down the Great Lakes. She sank in a storm in 1885 and lies wrecked under 180 feet of water.[84][85]
17 FRANCIS HINTON (steamer) December 16, 1996
(#96001457)
Off the coast of Manitowoc, Wisconsin
44°06′40″N 87°37′53″W
Manitowoc 152-foot wooden steambarge built in Manitowoc by Danish immigrants Hanson and Scove in 1889. She was broken up in November 1909, hauling lumber from Manistique to Chicago.[86]
18 FRANK O'CONNOR (bulk carrier) July 1, 1994
(#94000656)
2 miles (3.2 km) off Cana Island[23]
45°06′52″N 87°00′44″W
North Bay 301-foot wooden bulk carrier built in 1892 by James Davidson's shipyard in Bay City. On Sept 29, 1919, heading from Buffalo to Milwaukee hauling 3000 tons of coal, she caught fire and sank off Cana Island.[87]
19 GALLINIPPER Shipwreck (Schooner) December 28, 2010
(#10001091)
9.5 miles northeast of Hika Park in Lake Michigan
43°54′58″N 87°43′15″W
Centerville This early 95-foot wooden schooner was built in 1832 in Ohio for Michael Dousman. She traded goods from out East for furs from Wisconsin, carried passengers, and had various mishaps. Finally sank in a gale in 1851, and now sits largely intact under 210 feet of water.[88]
20 Grace A. Channon (canaller) Shipwreck December 4, 2017
(#100001874)
12.75 miles (20.52 km) NE of the Bender Park boat launch in L. Michigan
42°55′46″N 87°36′07″W
Oak Creek Largely intact 141-foot wooden 3-masted schooner designed to fit maximum cargo through the Welland Canal, built in 1873 by Ellenwood & Co. of East Saginaw, and named for the daughter of an owner. Mostly hauled grain east and coal west on the Great Lakes. In August 1877, she was struck by the propeller-driven steam barge Favorite and quickly sank.[89][90][91]
21 GRAPE SHOT (schooner) Shipwreck August 19, 2016
(#16000564)
0.2 miles (0.32 km) NW of USCCG Station on Plum Island
45°19′28″N 86°58′02″W
Washington 130-foot wooden centerboard schooner built in 1855 by B.B. Jones in Buffalo. Hauled lumber, wheat and coal on the upper Great Lakes until November 1867, when a gale drove her aground near Plum Island.[92]
22 GREEN BAY shipwreck (sloop) November 18, 2009
(#09000952)
In Green Bay, four miles off Sturgeon Bay
44°54′53″N 87°27′21″W
Sevastopol Remains of an unidentified commercial freighting sloop from circa 1840 to 1860 - the only wreck of this type in Wisconsin waters.[93]
23 HANOVER (schooner) Shipwreck October 5, 2015
(#15000710)
1.75 mi. NW. of Fish Cr.
45°08′48″N 87°16′13″W
Gibraltar The Hanover was a 109-foot 2-masted schooner constructed in New York in 1853. It hauled bulk cargo (primarily grain) up and down the Great Lakes until 1863, when a gale drove it aground off the Strawberry Islands, where it was stripped and abandoned.[94][95]
24 HENNEPIN Self-unloading Steamship (Shipwreck) February 1, 2008
(#07001489)
Lake Michigan[96]
42°27′39″N 86°31′47″W
South Haven The Hennepin was a wooden bulk carrier that sank in 1927. Originally named George H. Dyer; she caught fire in 1901. The fire damaged most of her upped deck and machinery, and therefore she was rebuilt with a conveyor belt and she became a self unloading bulk carrier.
25 Hetty Taylor (shipwreck) June 1, 2005
(#05000535)
Lake Michigan, 7 mi. SE of Sheboygan R.
43°41′00″N 87°39′17″W
Sheboygan 84-foot two-masted schooner built in 1874 by Allen, McClelland and Co. of Milwaukee. Hauled wood products and merchandise around Lake Michigan until August 1880, when she sank in a squall.[97]
26 Home (schooner) December 28, 2010
(#10001092)
10 miles southeast of Manitowoc[23]
43°56′50″N 87°33′17″W
Centerville Small lakeshoring schooner built in Portland, Ohio in 1843. Initially hauled grain and merchandise on Lake Erie; later lumber on Lake Michigan. Sank in 1858 after a collision with another schooner.[98]
27 I.A. JOHNSON Shipwreck (Scow Schooner) June 10, 2019
(#100004028)
8 miles north of Sheboygan
43°53′32″N 87°39′06″W
Mosel vicinity 83.80-foot 2-masted scow-schooner built in Dover Bay, Ohio, in 1867 by master carpenter J.A. Johnson. She was used to carry mixed goods until 1890 when she sankin a collision with another schooner.[99]
28 IRIS (Shipwreck) July 19, 2006
(#06000638)
Adjacent of Rock Island Ferry Dock, Jackson Harbor
45°24′03″N 86°51′12″W
Washington Island 74-foot scow schooner built in 1866 at Port Huron. Abandoned in 1913 after grounding in Jackson Harbor.[100]
29 Island City (schooner) Shipwreck November 10, 2011
(#11000810)
9 miles southeast of Port Washington in Lake Michigan
43°14′18″N 87°50′43″W
Mequon vicinity 81-foot lakeshoring schooner built by Peter Perry on Harsens Island, Michigan in 1859. Sank in a storm in April 1894, on her way from Ludington to Milwaukee, with two men lost.[101][102]
30 Jacksonport Wharf Archeological District February 28, 2012
(#12000053)
Near Lakeside Park off Cty. Rd. V
44°58′43″N 87°11′00″W
Jacksonport Remains of three old piers started in 1848 for loading shingles and poles into schooners headed for Milwaukee and Chicago. Remains of three schooners lie nearby: the Perry Hannah was wrecked by the Alpena Blow of 1880, the Cecilia wrecked by a storm in 1885, and possibly the Annie Dall, wrecked by a storm in 1898.[103] Additional documentation and boundary increase July 27, 2015 (#15000478)
31 J.M. Allmendinger (Steambarge) Shipwreck October 11, 2018
(#100003012)
2.5 mi. SSE of Concordia U. in Lake Michigan
43°13′05″N 87°53′39″W
Mequon 104 foot wood-hulled steam-screw barge built in 1883 by Albert Burgoyne at Benton Harbor. Hauled mostly lumber until November of 1895, when she ran aground during a gale and broke up.[104]
32 JOYS (Shipwreck) November 21, 2007
(#07001218)
500 ft. W of Sunset Park
44°51′04″N 87°23′21″W
Sturgeon Bay 131-foot wooden steam barge built in 1884 by the Milwaukee Shipyard Company. Hauled lumber, iron and stone. Caught fire in the Sturgeon Bay ship canal in 1898, burned and sank.[105][106]
33 Kate Kelly (Shipwreck) November 21, 2007
(#07001219)
L. Michigan, 2 mi. E of Wind Pt.
42°46′48″N 87°43′31″W
Wind Point 126-foot wooden-hulled 2-masted schooner built in 1867. Carried grain, coal and iron around the Great Lakes. Sank in a storm in 1895 carrying a load of hemlock railroad ties to Chicago. She lies in 54-feet of water.[107]
34 LADY ELGIN Shipwreck November 5, 1999
(#94000362)
Off Highwood, Illinois
42°11′00″N 87°39′00″W
Chicago vicinity 252-foot wooden paddle steamer rammed and sunk by the schooner Augusta on September 8, 1860 off Highwood, Illinois. Around 300 lives were lost. Today, she lies in 60 feet (18 m) of water.[108][109]
35 LAKELAND (steam screw) Shipwreck July 7, 2015
(#15000403)
6 mi. E. of Sturgeon Bay Canal
44°47′34″N 87°11′32″W
Sturgeon Bay In 1886, the Cambria was built as a bulk freighter and was an early user of steel hull plates and a triple-expansion steam engine. In 1910 it was remodeled into a passenger steamer, and in 1920 into a car carrier. In December 1924, hauling a load of automobiles from Chicago, some of her steel plates buckled in heavy seas, and she eventually went down in 205 feet of water.[110]
36 LaSalle Shipwreck (schooner) May 1, 2017
(#100000949)
1.27 mi. S. of Rawley Pt. Lighthouse in L. Michigan
44°11′31″N 87°30′35″W
Two Rivers 139-foot three-masted schooner built in 1874 by Parsons & Humble of Tonawanda, built to hold maximum grain yet fit through the locks of the Welland Canal. On October 25, 1875, heading with a load of wheat from Chicago for Buffalo, she was damaged in a gale, caught in quicksand, and wrecked.[111]
37 LIGHT VESSEL No.57 (Shipwreck) December 23, 1991
(#91001823)
600 feet south of South Shore Park's northern tip right along the shore
43°00′06″N 87°53′08″W
Milwaukee Lightship built in 1891 and sank in 1924. The only remaining lightship in Wisconsin waters.[112]
38 Lookout (schooner) Shipwreck June 5, 2017
(#100001051)
Lake Michigan, 4.35 miles (7.00 km) northeast of Two Rivers
44°11′42″N 87°30′36″W
Two Rivers 127-foot wooden schooner built in 1855 by George Hardison of Buffalo, NY. Sailed the Great Lakes for many years, with cargoes including grain, coal and lumber. Grounded off Rawley Point April 29, 1897, heading from Chicago to Masonville, Michigan in a northeast gale.[113]
39 LOUISIANA (Shipwreck) March 19, 1992
(#92000104)
Southeast side of Washington Harbor[23]
45°23′59″N 86°55′22″W
Washington Island 267-foot bulk steamer built in 1887 in Marine City, Michigan. Driven aground at Death's Door in a snowstorm Nov. 2, 1913, while heading for Escanaba to pick up a load of iron ore.[114]
40 LUMBERMAN shipwreck (schooner) January 14, 2009
(#08001331)
10 miles (16 km) north of Wind Point[23]
42°52′10″N 87°45′25″W
Oak Creek 126-foot 3-masted wooden-hulled schooner, built in 1862 to carry forest products around Lake Michigan. Capsized in a storm in 1893.
41 Major Anderson (barkentine) Shipwreck October 15, 2014
(#14000866)
Lake Michigan near mouth of Molash Cr.
44°10′57″N 87°30′40″W
Two Rivers 154-foot wooden barkentine schooner built in 1861 in Cleveland. Sank in a gale in 1871 while carrying a load of coal from Erie to Chicago.[115]
42 MATERIAL SERVICE (shipwreck) March 25, 2014
(#14000074)
Lake Michigan, northeast of Calumet Harbor[116]
41°44′33″N 87°30′23″W
North Township Unique self-unloading service barge built in 1929 in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin by the Leathem D. Smith Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company. She sank in 1936 storm with the loss of 15 lives.[117]
43 MERIDIAN (schooner) Shipwreck Site March 21, 1996
(#96000294)
Sister Island Shoals[23]
45°12′01″N 87°10′10″W
Sister Bay 120-foot schooner built in 1848 at Black River, Ohio. Hauled timber around the Great Lakes for 25 years until October of 1873, when she was driven by a fall storm onto the Sister Islands shoal in Green Bay and wrecked.[118]
44 MILWAUKEE (steam screw) Shipwreck July 27, 2015
(#15000479)
3 mi. E. of Fox Point
43°08′11″N 87°49′56″W
Fox Point A Milwaukee was a steel hulled train ferry built in 1902 by the American Shipbuilding Company of Cleveland, Ohio as the Manistique-Marquette & Northern No.1. She hauled cars of freight until 1929, when she sank with all hands in a storm. Her wreck sits in 120 feet (37 m) of water.[119]
45 MONTGOMERY shipwreck (schooner) September 13, 2019
(#100004377)
O.45 miles east of Whistling Straights Golf Course
43°51′07″N 87°43′10″W
Mosel 136-foot wooden schooner built in 1853 by J. Oades of Clayton, NY and rigged as a barkentine named Northern Light. In 1866 a second centerboard was added and she was rerigged as a 3-masted schooner. In November 1890, hauling 700 tons of coal, a gale drove her onto rocks where she broke up.[120][121]
46 MUSKEGON Shipwreck Site April 26, 1989
(#89000290)
Off the coast of Michigan City
41°43′00″N 86°56′00″W
Michigan City A passenger and package freight vessel that burned down at Muskegon, Michigan while she was unloading a cargo of sand.[122]
47 NIAGARA (steamer) December 16, 1996
(#96001456)
one mile off shore
43°29′19″N 87°46′30″W
Belgium The wreck of the Niagara, a 225-foot side-wheeled steamboat built in 1846 in Buffalo. Caught fire and sank in 1856, taking the lives of 60 of its 300 passengers.[123]
48 NORTHERNER Shipwreck (Schooner) December 10, 2010
(#10001005)
5 miles southeast of Port Washington Harbor in Lake Michigan
43°18′53″N 87°49′27″W
Grafton 81-foot lakeshoring schooner, built in 1850 by John Oades of Clayton, NY. In 1868 she was damaged while loading wood, started leaking badly, and sank off Port Ulao while being towed to Milwaukee for repair.[124][125]
49 OCEAN WAVE (Shipwreck) July 19, 2006
(#06000639)
2 mi. off Whitefish Point
44°53′07″N 87°09′08″W
Lake Michigan Wooden scow schooner built 1860 at Harrison's Island, Michigan. Sank in a storm September 23, 1869, hauling limestone.[126]
50 Pathfinder (schooner) Shipwreck October 5, 2015
(#15000712)
2.6 mi. N. of Rawley Point Light Station
44°14′44″N 87°30′41″W
Two Creeks 190-foot three-masted wooden schooner with an unusual keelson, built in Detroit in 1869. In November of 1886, carrying a load of iron ore from Marquette, a squall drove her ashore, where she now sits under 12 to 15 feet of water in quicksand, largely intact.[127]
51 Pilot Island NW Site March 19, 1992
(#92000103)
Off the coast of Pilot Island
45°17′05″N 86°55′03″W
Washington Wrecks of three wooden ships commingled on the reef SW of the island: the 115-foot scow-schooner Forest built in 1857 and wrecked by a storm in October of 1891, the 147-foot schooner A.P. Nichols built in 1861 and wrecked by a storm in October of 1892, and the 138-foot canaller-schooner J.E. Gilmore, built in 1867 and wrecked by another storm only 11 days after the Nichols.[128]
52 R.J. HACKETT (steamer) May 21, 1992
(#92000464)
Whaleback Shoal in Green Bay, 9.5 miles (15.3 km) southeast of the Cedar River in Menominee County, Michigan
45°21′28″N 87°10′55″W
Green Bay The R.J. Hackett was a steamer built in 1869 by shipbuilder Elihu M. Peck. When first launched, the ship's wide cross-section and long midships hold was an unconventional design, but the design's relative advantages in moving cargo through the inland lakes spawned many imitators. The Hackett is recognized as the very first Great Lakes freighter, a vessel type that has dominated Great Lakes shipping for over 100 years. In 1905, the Hackett caught fire and sank on Whaleback Shoal in Green Bay, 9.5 miles (15.3 km) southeast of the Cedar River. The wreck slipped slightly off the reef, and currently sits in 10 -14 feet of water.
53 Rosinco July 18, 2001
(#01000737)
12 miles (19 km) east of Kenosha
42°37′30″N 87°38′14″W
Lake Michigan Originally called the Georgiana III, the Rosinco was built in 1916 by well-known shipbuilders Harlan and Hollingsworth of Wilmington, Delaware. She sank in 1925 after striking some floating timbers. Today she lies intact in 195 feet (59 m) of water.[129]
54 ROUSE SIMMONS (Shipwreck) March 21, 2007
(#07000197)
6 mi (9.7 km). off Point Beach
44°16′45″N 87°24′52″W
Lake Michigan The Christmas Tree Ship. 124-foot 3-masted double-centerboard lumber schooner built in 1868. Later in her career she was used to haul Christmas trees from Thompson, Michigan to Chicago, and sank in November 1912, with all hands lost.[130][131]
55 S.C. Baldwin Shipwreck (barge) August 22, 2016
(#16000565)
2.3 miles (3.7 km) SSE of Rawley Point Light in Lake Michigan
44°11′35″N 87°27′12″W
Two Rivers 160-foot wooden steam barge built in 1871 to carry iron ore from Escanaba to Milwaukee and Chicago. Later carried lumber and coal until it sank in Green Bay in 1903. Raised and repurposed for hauling limestone out of Sturgeon Bay until she sank in August of 1908, losing one man.[132]
56 SELAH CHAMBERLAIN (bulk carrier) Shipwreck January 7, 2019
(#100003288)
2 miles NE of Sheboygan Pt. in Lake Michigan
43°46′12″N 87°39′24″W
Sheboygan The Selah Chamberlain was a 212-foot wooden bulk carrier built in 1873, in Cleveland by the Quayle & Murphy shipyard. She hauled bulk cargoes such as iron ore, coal and grain between Duluth and Buffalo. She sank in 1886, with the loss of five lives, after a collision with the John Pridgeon Jr. Her wreck lies in 90 feet (27 m) of water.[133]
57 SENATOR (steam screw) Shipwreck April 12, 2016
(#15000738)
16 miles off Port Washington
43°19′32″N 87°37′04″W
Port Washington vicinity 410-foot steam screw built in 1896 by the Detroit Dry Dock Company. In October 1929, heading from Milwaukee to Detroit carrying 241 (or 268?) Nash autos, she collided with the Marquette in a heavy fog and sank quickly, with 7 men lost.[134][135]
58 Silver Lake (scow-schooner) Shipwreck March 27, 2013
(#13000128)
7 miles (11 km) northeast of Sheboygan in Lake Michigan
43°48′21″N 87°34′42″W
Mosel vicinity 98.5 foot scow-schooner with double centerboard, built by M.L. Johnson in Little Point Sable, Michigan, in 1889. Hauled cargo around Lake Michigan until May, 1900, when she was run down by the car ferry Pere Marquette in a heavy fog.[136]
59 SUCCESS (scow schooner) Shipwreck October 5, 2015
(#15000711)
.13 mi. SW. of Whitefish Dunes State Park
44°54′59″N 87°12′10″W
Sevastopol 151-ton 2-masted scow schooner built in 1875 in Manitowoc. Hauled lumber on Lake Michigan until November 1896, when she was pushed aground by a storm while loading in Whitefish Bay. Still quite intact, with wire rigging, deadeyes, bilge pump and centerboard present.[137][138]
60 TENNIE AND LAURA (Shipwreck) April 11, 2008
(#08000288)
9 miles off shore from Port Washington
43°15′39″N 87°43′38″W
Port Washington 73-foot scow-schooner built by Gunder Jorgenson in Manitowoc in 1876. In 1903, running from Muskegon to Milwaukee under Captain John Sather with a load of lumber, she sank in a storm ten miles from her destination, with one crewman lost.[139]
61 Tubal Cain (barque) Shipwreck December 4, 2017
(#100001873)
1.33 miles (2.14 km) NE of Two Rivers harbor entrance in L. Michigan
44°09′22″N 87°32′32″W
Two Rivers vicinity 137-foot wooden canal barque built in 1866 by J.M. Jones of Detroit, built to carry grain between Chicago and New York via the Welland Canal. On Nov 26, 1867, heading out from Milwaukee carrying 18,000 bushels of wheat, she ran ashore just off Two Rivers, and settled into quicksand.[140]
62 Walter B. Allen (canaller) Shipwreck November 10, 2011
(#11000811)
7 miles northeast of Sheboygan in Lake Michigan
43°53′05″N 87°41′01″W
Mosel 2-masted schooner-rigged canaller, built in 1866 in Ogdensburg, NY, sized to just fit through the Welland Canal locks. Hauled grain east from Chicago to Buffalo or Oswego and coal west. Sank while being towed through a storm in 1880 and now sits under 175 feet of water, very intact.[141]
63 WISCONSIN shipwreck (iron steamer) October 7, 2009
(#09000820)
6.5 miles (10.5 km) south-southeast of Kenosha[23]
42°31′58″N 87°42′31″W
Kenosha Early iron hulled passenger and package freight vessel built in 1881 by the Detroit Dry Dock Company of Wyandotte, Michigan. She was nearly destroyed by a fire in 1907. She sank in 1929 with the loss of 9 lives after her cargo shifted.[142]

Lake Erie

[2] Name on the Register[3] Image Date listed[4] Location City or town Description
1 Anthony Wayne Shipwreck January 2, 2018
(#100001932)
About 8 miles off Vermilion.
41°31′00″N 82°23′00″W
Vermilion vicinity A 156-foot sidewheel steamer that was built in 1837 by Samuel L. Hubbel of Perrysburg, Ohio. She sank in 1850 about eight miles north of Vermilion, Ohio after her boilers exploded. She is the second oldest shipwreck in Ohio waters (after the recently discovered schooner Lake Serpent),[143] and the oldest known wreck of a steamship in the Great Lakes.[144]
2 Dunkirk Schooner Site May 1, 2009
(#09000285)
About 20 miles off Dunkirk, New York
42°33′00″N 79°36′00″W
Dunkirk Remains of an early, unidentified Great Lakes schooner resting in 170 feet (52 m) of water.[145]

Lake Ontario

[2] Name on the Register Image Date listed[4] Location City or town Description
1 St. Peter, (Shipwreck) March 22, 2004
(#04000226)
Near Pultneyville
43°18′42″N 77°07′52″W
Pultneyville 135.7-foot schooner built in 1873 and sank in 1898. She lies in 110-feet of water.[146]

References

  1. The latitude and longitude information provided in this table was derived originally from the National Register Information System, which has been found to be fairly accurate for about 99% of listings. Some locations in this table may have been corrected to current GPS standards.
  2. Numbers represent an ordering by significant words. Various colorings, defined here, differentiate National Historic Landmarks and historic districts from other NRHP buildings, structures, sites or objects.
  3. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. April 24, 2008.
  4. The eight-digit number below each date is the number assigned to each location in the National Register Information System database, which can be viewed by clicking the number.
  5. The ten shipwrecks off Isle Royale are listed as "address restricted." However, the Isle Royale National Park Diving makes it clear that the wrecks are open to diving, and the location information is listed at the "Scuba Diving Page". Isle Royale National Park. Retrieved December 12, 2010.. Geo-coordinates are from "The Wrecks of Isle Royale". Black Dog Diving. Archived from the original on July 14, 2011. Retrieved December 12, 2010., a dive company suggested by the National Park.
  6. "Algoma". Superior Trips. Retrieved September 27, 2019.
  7. "George Spencer". Lake Superior Shipwrecks. Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved 2016-05-15.
  8. "America". Superior Trips. Retrieved September 27, 2019.
  9. "Antelope (1861)". Wisconsin Shipwrecks. Wisconsin Sea Grant, Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2019-01-12.
  10. "Benjamin Noble (shipwreck)". Minnesota National Register Properties Database. Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-09-19.
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  12. " "BIG BAY SLOOP shipwreck (sloop)". Digital Asset Management System, National Park Service. Retrieved September 5, 2017.
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  16. "Cumberland". Superior Trips. Retrieved September 27, 2019.
  17. "Emperor". Superior Trips. Retrieved September 27, 2019.
  18. "George M. Cox". Superior Trips. Retrieved September 27, 2019.
  19. "Glenlyon". Superior Trips. Retrieved September 27, 2019.
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  21. "Weekly List 20180810". National Park Service. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
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  23. Location given in Kohl, Cris (2001). The Great Lakes Diving Guide. West Chicago, Ill.: Seawolf Communications, Inc. NRIS lists site as "address restricted".
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  44. "Sevona (1890)". Wisconsin's Great Lakes Shipwrecks. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved February 13, 2018.
  45. "Thomas Wilson". Lake Superior Shipwrecks. Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-08-28.
  46. "T. H. Camp (shipwreck)". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2013-02-08.
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  53. "Grecian". Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary. Retrieved September 27, 2019.
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  61. Location derived from Sanilac Shores Underwater Preserve, Michigan Underwater Preserve Council, 2011. Accessed 18 November 2015. The NRIS lists the site as "Address Restricted"
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  65. "Alaska (1869)". Wisconsin Shipwrecks. Wisconsin Sea Grant, Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2017-05-17.
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  77. "Christina Nilsson". Wisconsin's Great Lakes Shipwrecks. Wisconsin Historical Society & University of Wisconsin Sea Grant. Retrieved 2013-11-23.
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  80. "Daniel Lyons Shipwreck". National Register or State Register. Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-08-20.
  81. "E.M.B.A. (Employees' Mutual Benefit Association) (1890)". Wisconsin Shipwrecks. Wisconsin Sea Grant, Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2018-09-29.
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  84. "Floretta Shipwreck (Canaller)". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2015-12-27.
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