Liberal Party of Australia (Tasmanian Division)

The Liberal Party of Australia (Tasmanian Division), commonly known as the Tasmanian Liberals, is the state division of the Liberal Party of Australia in Tasmania.[3] The party currently governs in Tasmania. The party is part of the federal Liberal Party of Australia which governs nationally in Coalition with the National Party of Australia.

Parliamentary Party Leader
Incumbent
Premier of Tasmania Will Hodgman

since 15 March 2014
Inaugural holderNeil Campbell

Liberal Party of Australia
(Tasmanian Division)
AbbreviationLP [1]
LeaderWill Hodgman
PresidentRod Scurrah
Deputy LeaderJeremy Rockliff
Senior Vice PresidentPeter McKay
TreasurerGeoff Page
Young Liberal PresidentBen Singline
Women's Council PresidentRochelle Piesse
Founded13 February 1945 (1945-02-13)[2]
HeadquartersSuite 4C, Level 3, 33 Salamanca Place, Hobart TAS 7000
Youth wingYoung Liberals
Women's wingLiberal Women's Council
IdeologyLiberal conservatism
Classical liberalism
Political positionCentre-right
National affiliationLiberal Party of Australia
Colors     Blue
SloganBuilding Your Future
House of Reps (Tas. seats)
2 / 5
Senate (Tas. seats)
4 / 12
House of Assembly
13 / 25
Legislative Council
2 / 15
Website
tas.liberal.org.au

History

In 1904, Elliott Lewis established the National League, which changed its name to the Progressive League in 1907. While Lewis became Premier of the state in 1909 under this banner, the League itself shortly disappeared.[4][5] Its successor was the Tasmanian Liberal League, founded later that year in collaboration with the Tasmanian Farmers and Stockowners Association.[6] In 1917, the League affiliated with the Australian Liberal Union.

Following the removal of Billy Hughes from the leadership of the Labor Party, the League merged again to become the Tasmanian National Federation. It shared government with the Labor Party from 1912 to 1923, and then from 1928 to 1934.[7] Despite the establishment of the United Australia Party by Joseph Lyons, the party continued using the name National until 1941 when it changed its name to the 'United Australia and National Organisation'.[8] In 1945 the party came under the umbrella of the new Liberal Party of Australia.

The Tasmanian Division of the party was formed at a meeting in Hobart on 13 February 1945. The first state candidates stood at the 1946 election, most of whom were ex-servicemen. The organisation recruited them by arguing that in the services they had been fighting for freedom, and it was now their duty 'to finish the job'. The party first formed a government in Tasmania 1969.[9]

In 1982, Robin Gray was elected on a platform of commitment to building the Gordon-below-Franklin hydro-electric power scheme. Continual blockades from the Labor Federal Government lead to the Premier threatening to secede from the Commonwealth if any further intervention was taken.[10] Despite the lack of success in the Tasmanian Dam Case, the Gray government won the 1986 state election and held onto power until 1989.[11]

The party was elected at the 1992 state election with Ray Groom as leader, however at the subsequent 1996 election following a promise not to form minority government Groom resigned.[12] Tony Rundle was quick to replace Groom as Liberal leader and reached an informal agreement with the Tasmanian Greens to secure support.

At the 2014 state election, Will Hodgman secured a majority of seats following a 16-year incumbent Labor government led by Lara Giddings. The party was re-elected at the 2018 state election.

Organisation

Each division of the Liberal Party is autonomous, with a unique organisational structure and their own constitutions.[13]

Premiers

Five parliamentary Liberal leaders have served as Premier of Tasmania: Angus Bethune (1969–1972), Robin Gray (1982–1989), Ray Groom (1992–1996), Tony Rundle (1996–1998) and Will Hodgman (2014–present).

Deputy Premiers

Six parliamentary Liberal deputy leaders have served as Deputy Premier of Tasmania: Max Bingham (1982–1984), Geoff Pearsall (1984–1988), Ray Groom (1988–1989), John Beswick (1992–1996), Sue Napier (1996–1998) and Jeremy Rockliff (2014–).

List of parliamentary leaders

State election results

Election Seats won ± Total votes % Position Leader
1946
12 / 30
44,158 34.25% Opposition Neil Campbell
1948
12 / 30
0 54,010 37.84% Opposition Neil Campbell
1950
14 / 30
2 69,429 47.57% Opposition Rex Townley
1955
15 / 30
1 70,959 45.35% Opposition Rex Townley
1956
15 / 30
0 69,477 43.61% Opposition Tim Jackson
1959
16 / 35
1 66,005 41.05% Opposition Tim Jackson
1964
16 / 35
0 67,971 38.49% Opposition Angus Bethune
1969
17 / 35
1 83,261 43.98% Minority Government Angus Bethune
1972
14 / 35
3 76,073 38.37% Opposition Angus Bethune
1976
17 / 35
3 104,613 44.5% Opposition Max Bingham
1979
15 / 35
2 98,845 41.3% Opposition Max Bingham
1982
18 / 35
3 121,346 48.5% Majority Government Robin Gray
1986
18 / 35
0 138,836 54.2% Majority Government Robin Gray
1989
17 / 35
1 128,143 46.9% Opposition Robin Gray
1992
19 / 35
2 154,337 54.1% Majority Government Ray Groom
1996
16 / 35
3 121,391 41.2% Minority Government Ray Groom
1998
10 / 25
6 112,146 38.1% Opposition Tony Rundle
2002
7 / 25
3 81,185 27.4% Opposition Bob Cheek
2006
7 / 25
0 98,511 31.8% Opposition Rene Hidding
2010
10 / 25
3 124,933 39.0% Opposition Will Hodgman
2014
15 / 25
5 167,051 51.2% Majority Government Will Hodgman
2018
13 / 25
2 168,303 50.3% Majority Government Will Hodgman

References

  1. "Political party name abbreviations & codes, demographic ratings and seat status". Australian Electoral Commission. 18 January 2016.
  2. "Our History". 12 June 2013.
  3. "Current register of political parties". Australian Electoral Commission. Retrieved 19 November 2016.
  4. "Lewis, Sir Neil Elliott (1858-1935)". The Australian National University. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  5. "The Liberal Party and It's Twentieth Century Precursors". The University of Tasmania. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  6. McRae, J (1961). The Tasmanian Farmers, Stockowners & Orchardists Association.
  7. Bennett, S; Bennett, B (1980). Biographical register of the Tasmanian parliament, 1851–1960. Canberra.
  8. White, K (2000). Joseph Lyons. Melbourne.
  9. Weller, P (1971). The organization of early non-Labor parties in Tasmania.
  10. Pink, Kerry (2001). Through Hells Gates: A History of Strahan and Macquarie Harbour. ISBN 0-646-36665-3.
  11. Ward, Airlie: Minority Government, Stateline Tasmania (Australian Broadcasting Corporation), 10 March 2006.
  12. "The Parliament of Tasmania from 1856". Parliament of Tasmania. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  13. Tasmanian Liberals. "About". Tasmanian Liberals. Retrieved 4 February 2019.

Further reading

  • Lucadou-Wells R (1994) 50 year history of the Liberal Party (Tasmanian Division), Hobart, Tasmania.
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