Lansdale Catholic High School

Lansdale Catholic High School is a secondary school that is part of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia. It is located in Lansdale, Pennsylvania, United States.

Lansdale Catholic High School
Address
700 Lansdale Avenue

, ,
19446

United States
Coordinates40°14′30″N 75°16′7″W
Information
TypePrivate, coeducational
MottoFides Scientia
(Faith, Knowledge)
Religious affiliation(s)Roman Catholic
Established1949
FounderMonsignor Schade
PresidentJames Casey
PrincipalRita McGovern
ChaplainFr. John Nordeman
Grades9-12
Enrollment700 (2018)
Average class size30
Color(s)Green and gold         
SloganA Learning Community Teaching Values for Life
Athletics conferencePhiladelphia Catholic League
MascotThe Crusader (vinny lee)
Team nameCrusaders
AccreditationMiddle States Association of Colleges and Schools [1]
PublicationThe Catalyst (literary magazine)
NewspaperThe Crusader
YearbookTrail
Tuition$7,300
Websitewww.lansdalecatholic.com

History

The school opened in September 1949 as Little Flower Catholic High School, after its patron saint, Therese of Lisieux. The first year had only a freshman class in a very small building on the grounds of St. Stanislaus Church in Lansdale. That building is still functioning on the property of St. Stanislaus, and today is called Little Flower Hall. Each succeeding year, another class/year was added and in 1953, commencement exercises were held for the first graduating class of 33 students.

Probably the main, if not the only, driving force to bring about the establishment of the school was Monsignor Joseph Schade, who was the Pastor of St. Stanislaus at that time. He was aided in his efforts by the willingness of the Sisters of St. Francis of Assisi of Philadelphia who initially staffed the school, with Sister Theresa Clare being the first principal (and one of the teachers).

In September 1960, the present facility opened at 7th Street and Lansdale Avenue on a property that consisted of approximately 79 acres (32 ha) of land, and the first class graduated from there in 1961. Although the sports teams had long been referred to as Lansdale Catholic, it was with the opening of the new facility that the name of the school was "officially" changed to Lansdale Catholic High School.

The school continued as a "parish" high school until the mid-1980s when control of the school was taken over by the Archdiocese.

In 1988, there was the dedication of a major addition to the school. It was made possible primarily through the support of the Business Leaders Organized for Catholic Schools.

In more recent years, other improvements were added including another on-site parking facility, baseball field, window replacements, air-conditioning in the gymnasium, reconditioning of the football and lacrosse fields. Over the Summer of 2012, the gymnasium was completely refurbished with new floors and bleachers.

On January 28, 2008, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced that the school would move following the 2012 graduation pending funding. A new school, Lansdale Catholic Regional High School, in Hilltown Township, Bucks County, was to be built to replace the school in Lansdale. The name of the new school was voted by the students, parents and alumni. That project was cancelled because of financial reasons.

Honors

  • 2016 and 2017 PIAA District XII Class AA Boys Volleyball Champions
  • 2017 PIAA District XII Class AA Boys Lacrosse Champions
  • 2010 ICLE (International Center for Leadership in Education) Model School
  • 2008 Girls' ice hockey champions
  • 2007 PIAA District 1 Class AA football champions
  • 2007 Pioneer Athletic Conference (PAC) football champions
  • 2004 Landale Catholic football team won the PIAA class AA state football championship.[2]
  • 1993 men's cross country team won the PIAA class AA state championship, the first state championship in school history
  • 1991 PIAA District I girls' basketball champions
  • 1990 PIAA District I Class AA soccer champions
  • 1987-1990 PAC-10 League cross country champions
  • 1981 Bicentennial League men's basketball champions
  • 1981 Bicentennial League men's track and field champions

In the media

  • Jim Lynam started his coaching career coaching the boys' basketball team for the 1964 season.[4]
  • In 1973, Bishop Michael Joseph Bransfield was a member of the faculty.
  • In 1998, the Lansdale Catholic football team won an ESPN ESPY Awards for "Outrageous Play of the Year", with a "Cal-Stanford" play in a game against Upper Perkiomen.[5]
  • In 2005 and 2006, the Lansdale Catholic girls' ice hockey team won the championship title. They won second place in 2003, 2004 and 2007. They have reached the championship round since they were deemed a team.
  • In 2008, Lansdale Catholic left the Pioneer Athletic Conference, and joined the Philadelphia Catholic League.

Notable alumni

  • Larry Glueck, Class of 1959[6] - professional American football player and coach
  • Tom Fazio, Class of 1962[7] - golf course designer
  • Peggy March, Class of 1966[8] - youngest female artist to have a number one single in the United States; she released "I Will Follow Him" in 1963, at the age of 15. (Born Margaret A. Battavio)
  • Timothy C. Senior, Class of 1977[9] - currently Roman Catholic auxiliary bishop of Philadelphia, wrote LCHS alma mater

Sources and references

  1. MSA-CSS. "MSA-Commission on Secondary Schools". Archived from the original on March 25, 2009. Retrieved May 26, 2009.
  2. "PIAA Class AA Football Past Champions". easternpafootball.com. Retrieved October 8, 2006.
  3. "FIRST Awards". For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology. Retrieved October 8, 2006.
  4. Sielski, Mike. "Lynam holds court again". Calkins Media, Inc. Retrieved November 9, 2006.
  5. "The 2003 ESPY Awards". Retrieved November 19, 2008.
  6. "Glueck clicked on the football field". Retrieved May 17, 2019.
  7. "Tom Fazio Biography". Retrieved April 15, 2010.
  8. "Peggy March (Official Website)". Retrieved November 17, 2006.
  9. "Monsignor Timothy C. Senior Named Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia". Retrieved June 8, 2009.
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