Lachute

Lachute (French pronunciation: [laʃyt]) is a town in southwest Quebec, Canada, 62 km (39 mi) northwest of Montreal, on the Rivière du Nord, a tributary of the Ottawa River, and west of Mirabel International Airport. It is located on Autoroute 50, at the junctions of Quebec Provincial Highways Route 148, Route 158, and Secondary Highways 327 and 329.

Lachute
Location within Argenteuil RCM
Lachute
Location in central Quebec
Coordinates: 45°39′N 74°20′W[1]
Country Canada
Province Quebec
RegionLaurentides
RCMArgenteuil
Settled1753
ConstitutedApril 30, 1966
Government
  MayorCarl Peloquin
  Federal ridingArgenteuil—La Petite-Nation
  Prov. ridingArgenteuil
Area
  City112.80 km2 (43.55 sq mi)
  Land109.20 km2 (42.16 sq mi)
  Metro109.20 km2 (42.16 sq mi)
Population
 (2011)[3]
  City12,551
  Density114.9/km2 (298/sq mi)
  Metro12,551
  Metro density114.9/km2 (298/sq mi)
  Pop 2006–2011
6.1%
  Dwellings
5,991
Time zoneUTC−5 (EST)
  Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Postal code(s)
J8H
Area code(s)450 and 579
Highways
A-50

Route 148
Route 158
Route 327
Route 329
Websitewww.ville.lachute.qc.ca

Lachute is the seat of Argenteuil Regional County Municipality, and is served by the Lachute Airport. Its major industries include paper mills and lumber. The population is about 12,000 people.

History

Originally in the 17th century, "La Chute" identified a cataract or falls on the North River (Rivière du Nord) located about 24 km (15 mi) upstream from its confluence with the Ottawa River.[5] In 1753, Antoine Brunet became the first francophone to settle in Lachute temporarily. In 1796, Jedediah Lane, from Jericho, Vermont, bought several thousand acres of land on both sides of the North River, where Lachute is today. That same year, Hezekiah Clark and his family, also of Jericho, settled near the falls on the North River, followed by Loyalists fleeing the American Revolution. Two years later, the population of the Chute settlement (as it was then known by its English name) consisted of five families.[6]

The village grew quickly; by 1803, 30 families were scattered on both banks of the North River and by 1810, Lachute counted 83 families, including 211 children of school age. In 1804, a mill was built at the falls and the first general store opened in 1813. One year later, Sir John Johnson bought a large part of the Argenteuil Seigneury. He built a sawmill and gave land for the construction of churches, helping to attract new settlers to Argenteuil. In 1825, Thomas Barron became the first judge, then the first mayor of Lachute.[6] The Lachute post office was established in 1835.[5]

From 1870 to 1880, Lachute went through another period of expansion, including economic and social development; the railway linking Montreal and Ottawa was built through the centre of the small town. Industries were established: Félix Hamelin and Thomas Henry Ayers established a wool mill and Irishman James Crocket Wilson opened a paper mill.[6]

In 1885, the Town of Lachute was incorporated with a population around 1300 persons, and in the same year, Lachute high school was founded. In 1901, electricity was brought to the town.[6]

In 1966, Lachute and the Village of Ayersville merged, forming the Cité de Lachute. In 1971, during the construction of Montréal-Mirabel International Airport, a part of the Saint-Jérusalem Parish was added to Lachute. In 1981, Cité de Lachute became Ville de Lachute. In 2000, about 10 km2 of Mirabel's territory were annexed by Lachute. In 2002, the Service de police municipale de Lachute was transferred to the Sûreté du Québec.[6]

The Expo Lachute Fair is the oldest fair in Quebec and the second-oldest in all of Canada, running from 1825 to the present. In 1917, the Argenteuil Agricultural Society purchased land to hold the Expo Lachute Fair permanently in Lachute. In 1917, the construction of the grandstand and the track was completed, with new cattle and horse barns being constructed as time and money allowed. The Fall Fair was changed to a Spring Fair in 1925 so that it could be deemed strictly a livestock show. Lachute was not always host to the exhibition; from 1825 to 1826, inhabitants of the county of York met in the then-bustling business center of St. Andrews, to form a society called the County of York Agricultural Society, later changed to the Two Mountains Agricultural Society, and finally the Argenteuil Agricultural Society. Today, the Expo Lachute Fair is still going strong; an annual agriculture fair is held in July and the Fall Derby is in September. The fairgrounds are also used for several other local events throughout the year.[7]

Demographics

Population

Canada census – Lachute, Quebec community profile
2011 2006
Population: 12,551 (+6.1% from 2006) 11,832 (+1.8% from 2001)
Land area: 109.20 km2 (42.16 sq mi) 108.67 km2 (41.96 sq mi)
Population density: 114.9/km2 (298/sq mi) 108.9/km2 (282/sq mi)
Median age: 47.1 (M: 45.6, F: 48.4) 44.8 (M: 43.7, F: 45.9)
Total private dwellings: 5,991 5,449
Median household income: $40,516 $36,444
References: 2011[3] 2006[8] earlier[9]
Historical Census Data – Lachute, Quebec[10]
YearPop.±%
1880 650    
1925 3,000+361.5%
1941 5,310+77.0%
1957 8,848+66.6%
YearPop.±%
1991 11,730+32.6%
1996 11,493−2.0%
1996A 11,556+0.5%
2001 11,628+0.6%
YearPop.±%
2006 11,832+1.8%
2011 12,551+6.1%
(A) adjustment due to boundary change.

Language

Canada Census Mother Tongue – Lachute, Quebec[10]
Census Total
French
English
French & English
Other
Year Responses Count Trend Pop % Count Trend Pop % Count Trend Pop % Count Trend Pop %
2011
12,305
10,705 6.2% 87.00% 1,310 7.3% 10.65% 130 23.1% 1.05% 160 5.9% 1.30%
2006
11,525
10,040 4.3% 87.11% 1,215 10.0% 10.54% 100 13.0% 0.87% 170 29.4% 1.48%
2001
11,195
9,610 3.1% 85.84% 1,350 23.1% 12.06% 115 21.7% 1.03% 120 17.2% 1.07%
1996
11,300
9,310 n/a 82.39% 1,755 n/a 15.53% 90 n/a 0.80% 145 n/a 1.28%

Climate

Climate data for Lachute (1981-2010)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 10.5
(50.9)
12.5
(54.5)
20.5
(68.9)
31
(88)
32.2
(90.0)
35
(95)
34.4
(93.9)
35.5
(95.9)
32.5
(90.5)
27.2
(81.0)
20
(68)
13.5
(56.3)
35.5
(95.9)
Average high °C (°F) −6.1
(21.0)
−3.5
(25.7)
2.3
(36.1)
11.3
(52.3)
18.8
(65.8)
23.8
(74.8)
26
(79)
24.9
(76.8)
20.0
(68.0)
12.4
(54.3)
4.9
(40.8)
−2.5
(27.5)
11.0
(51.8)
Daily mean °C (°F) −10.7
(12.7)
−8.6
(16.5)
−2.6
(27.3)
6.0
(42.8)
12.9
(55.2)
18.0
(64.4)
20.4
(68.7)
19.3
(66.7)
14.7
(58.5)
7.7
(45.9)
1.3
(34.3)
−6.5
(20.3)
6.0
(42.8)
Average low °C (°F) −15.4
(4.3)
−13.6
(7.5)
−7.5
(18.5)
0.7
(33.3)
6.9
(44.4)
12.2
(54.0)
14.7
(58.5)
13.7
(56.7)
9.2
(48.6)
3.1
(37.6)
−2.4
(27.7)
−10.4
(13.3)
0.9
(33.6)
Record low °C (°F) −37
(−35)
−35
(−31)
−30.5
(−22.9)
−15
(5)
−6.7
(19.9)
−1.5
(29.3)
3.5
(38.3)
0
(32)
−5
(23)
−8.9
(16.0)
−20.6
(−5.1)
−34.5
(−30.1)
−37
(−35)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 91.2
(3.59)
69.7
(2.74)
72.9
(2.87)
87.5
(3.44)
96.4
(3.80)
115.0
(4.53)
100.2
(3.94)
103.6
(4.08)
107.6
(4.24)
110.1
(4.33)
106.3
(4.19)
90.1
(3.55)
1,150.5
(45.30)
Source: Environment Canada[11]

Education

The Commission scolaire de la Rivière-du-Nord operates French-language public schools.

  • École l'Oasis
  • École Saint-Alexandre
  • École Saint-Julien
  • École polyvalente Lavigne

Sir Wilfrid Laurier School Board operates English-language public schools:

Notable Lachutois

Media

See also

References

  1. Reference number 114406 of the Commission de toponymie du Québec (in French)
  2. Geographic code 76020 in the official Répertoire des municipalités (in French)
  3. "2011 Community Profiles". 2011 Canadian Census. Statistics Canada. July 5, 2013. Retrieved 2014-03-03.
  4. Lachute (Census agglomeration), Quebec, 2011 Census profile. The census agglomeration consists of only Lachute itself. This was unchanged from the 2006 census.
  5. "Lachute (Ville)" (in French). Commission de toponymie du Québec. Retrieved 2009-02-17.
  6. "Lachute, d'hier à aujourd'hui" (in French). La ville de Lachute. Retrieved 2009-02-17.
  7. http://expolachutefair.com
  8. "2006 Community Profiles". 2006 Canadian Census. Statistics Canada. March 30, 2011. Retrieved 2014-03-03.
  9. "2001 Community Profiles". 2001 Canadian Census. Statistics Canada. February 17, 2012.
  10. Statistics Canada: 1996, 2001, 2006, 2011 census
  11. Environment Canada. Retrieved 31 December 2010.
  12. "LAURENTIAN ELEMENTARY ZONE." Sir Wilfrid Laurier School Board. Retrieved on September 16, 2017.
  13. "LAURENTIAN REGIONAL HS ZONE." Sir Wilfrid Laurier School Board. Retrieved on September 4, 2017.
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