Kingston upon Thames (parish)

Kingston upon Thames was an ancient parish in the county of Surrey, England. By 1839 it contained these chapelries, curacies or ecclesiastical parishes which eventually became civil parishes in their own right:[1]

Daughter parish Creation of vestry Notes as to its vestry/BoroughNotes as to creation Local authority today
Claygate 1861 Board was Esher and the Dittons Urban District from 1895[2] From Thames Ditton[3] Elmbridge
East Molesey 1769 Local board from 1866 Elmbridge
Ham with Hatch* 1866 Local board from 1858 Richmond-upon-Thames
Hook* 1866 Local board from 1866[4] First church built 1838 made a Chapelry 1839.[5] Kingston upon Thames
Kew 1769[6] Absorbed by Borough of Richmond in 1892 Richmond-upon-Thames
Kingston upon Thames* 1484 Parish vestry powers mainly vested in identical-area Municipal Borough of Kingston-upon-Thames (abbrev. Kingston M.B.) Kingston upon Thames
New Malden 1894 Local board from 1866 Kingston upon Thames
Petersham 1769 Absorbed by Borough of Richmond in 1892 Attached to Kew until 1891[7] Richmond-upon-Thames
Richmond (previously Sheen) 1849[8] remained with those marked * in 1769 Became Borough of Richmond in 1890 Richmond-upon-Thames
Surbiton 1894 Improvement commissioners from 1855 Kingston upon Thames
Thames Ditton 1769 School Board from 1881. Board: Esher and the Dittons Urban District from 1895 [2] Elmbridge
Kingston upon Thames
History
  Abolished1894
  Succeeded byVarious (see text)
StatusCivil parish before which Parish (meaning combined civil and ecclesiastic functions, and pre-1066-incepted, known today as ancient parish)

It follows from the above list of chapelries and the hamlet of Hook, frequently listed in the medieval age that, well before the Conquest, the ancient parish was the Kingston hundred (of Surrey). There soon was a southern exception to this. By the 1086 snapshot of the Domesday Book, Long Ditton (which included exclave Tolworth east of Hook hamlet) had a fully-fledged church likely gaining its independence around that time as recorded throughout the high medieval age and onwards. Thus, in the grant of Kingston church and Long Ditton church to Merton Priory, soon after its foundation in 1117, Long Ditton does not appear as a chapelry of Kingston.[9]

The residual Church of England ecclesiastical parish essentially divides sixfold:

  • All Saints - whole riverside strip - 1 church[10]
  • St Peter, Norbiton - 2 churches[11]
  • St Luke - 1 church - between railway and the Kingston Academy/Wolsey park[12]
  • Kingston Hill, St Paul - 1 church[13]
  • Kingston upon Thames, St John the Evangelist - Penrhyn Road & The Grove southern area - 1 church[14]
  • Kingston Vale, St John the Baptist - 1 church[15]

References

  1. Youngs, Frederic (1979). Guide to the Local Administrative Units of England. I: Southern England. London: Royal Historical Society. ISBN 0-901050-67-9.
  2. http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/unit/10074083
  3. 'Parishes: Thames Ditton', in A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3, ed. H E Malden (London, 1911), pp. 462-467. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/surrey/vol3/pp462-467
  4. http://visionofbritain.org.uk/unit/10188209
  5. http://visionofbritain.org.uk/descriptions/759450
  6. Private Act, 9 Geo. III, cap. 65.
  7. Kew and Petersham Vicarage Acts 1891
  8. Local Act, 12 & 13 Vict. cap. 42.
  9. 'Parishes: Long Ditton', in A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3, ed. H E Malden (London, 1911), pp. 516-522. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/surrey/vol3/pp516-522
  10. Map of All Saints parish
  11. Map of St Peter's parish
  12. Map of St Luke's parish
  13. Map of St Paul's parish
  14. Map of St John the Evangelist's parish
  15. Map of St John the Baptist's parish

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