King George Island (Tasmania)

King George Island is an island in south-eastern Australia. It is part of the Sloping Island Group, lying close to the south-eastern coast of Tasmania around the Tasman and Forestier Peninsulas. The island was once inhabited and farmed and contains the ruins of two buildings on its eastern side. A conservation covenant is in place on this island.[1]

King George Island
Aerial photograph of King George Island
King George Island
Location in Tasmania
Geography
LocationTasmania
Coordinates42°57′S 147°49′E
ArchipelagoSloping Island Group
Adjacent bodies of waterNorfolk Bay
Area0.198 km2 (0.076 sq mi)
Administration
Land districtPembroke
Additional information
Time zone
Discovered in 1798

Flora and fauna

Much of the island’s original vegetation has been destroyed by clearing and burning, though there are remnant stands of allocasuarinas and eucalypts. Rabbits are present as well as the metallic skink and White's skink.[1] Details of the fauna and flora of the island can be found in this article by Bush Heritage Australia from 2010.[2]

Nomenclature

King George Island has also been referred to as "Gull Island" on maps of Bass and Flinders' voyage in 1798-1799 around the Tasman peninsula.[3] It was still referred to Gull Island in 1836.[4]

History

Captain James Kelly applied to the government in 1841 for a lease for three acres of land on the island to operate a bay whaling station.[5]

On 15 June 1863 King George Island was put to public auction through a large sale of crown land, with offers over £54 considered.[6] On the 15 November 1884 the island was sold by the owner John Clark.[7] In 1914 a gentleman named Mr G. Long, from Dunalley, owned the island. He grew potatoes on the island.[8]

References

  1. Brothers, Nigel; Pemberton, David; Pryor, Helen; Halley, Vanessa (2001). Tasmania’s Offshore Islands: seabirds and other natural features. Hobart: Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery. p. 606. ISBN 0-7246-4816-X.
  2. "Protection of King George Island - Bush Heritage Australia". bushheritage.org.au.
  3. "Janet Somerville's Botanical History of Tasmania, 1642-1820". google.com.au.
  4. "A New and Comprehensive Gazetteer". google.com.au.
  5. Evans, Kathryn (1993). Shore-based whaling in Tasmania historical research project: Volume 2; site histories. Hobart: Parks & Wildlife Service. p. 67.
  6. "15 Jun 1863 - Advertising". nla.gov.au.
  7. "23 Oct 1884 - Advertising". nla.gov.au.
  8. "16 Jul 1914 - NEWS OF THE DAY. "THE TASMANIAN MAIL."". nla.gov.au.


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