Kawanishi E13K

The Kawanishi E13K, company designationAM-19, was a Japanese 1930s three-seat reconnaissance floatplane.

E13K
Role reconnaissance floatplane
Manufacturer Kawanishi Aircraft Company
First flight 28 September 1938
Primary user IJN Air Service

Design and development

In 1937 the Imperial Japanese Navy requested the Kawanishi Aircraft Company and Aichi to design a replacement for the Navy's E7K seaplanes. Kawanishi's design, given the short designation E13K and long designation Kawanishi Navy 12-Shi Three-seat Reconnaissance Seaplane, was an all-metal single-float seaplane armed with one Type 92 machine gun and either one bomb under the fuselage or 4 bombs under the wings.[1]

The first of two E13K prototypes flew on 28 September 1938. In October 1938, the aircraft was transferred to the fleet base for testing, and even though the E13K outperformed the Aichi E13A except in maximum speed, it was difficult to operate, so the Navy chose the E13A to be the replacement for the E7K.[1]

Operators

 Japan

Specifications

Data from Japanese Aircraft, 1910-1941[1]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 3
  • Length: 11.725 m (38 ft 6 in)
  • Wingspan: 14.49 m (47 ft 6 in)
  • Height: 4.453 m (14 ft 7 in)
  • Wing area: 34 m2 (370 sq ft)
  • Empty weight: 2,170 kg (4,784 lb)
  • Gross weight: 3,550 kg (7,826 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Mitsubishi MK8 Kinsei 3-Kai 14-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine, 680 kW (910 hp)
  • Propellers: 3-bladed variable pitch propeller

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 350 km/h (220 mph, 190 kn)
  • Cruise speed: 222 km/h (138 mph, 120 kn)
  • Alighting speed:107 km/h (66 mph; 58 kn)
  • Endurance: 16 hours
  • Service ceiling: 6,690 m (21,950 ft)
  • Time to altitude: 4,000 m (13,000 ft) in 9 minutes 14 seconds
  • Wing loading: 104.4 kg/m2 (21.4 lb/sq ft)
  • Power/mass: 5.2 kg/kW (8.6 lb/hp)

Armament

See also

Related lists

References

  1. Mikesh, Robert C.; Shorzoe Abe (1990). Japanese Aircraft, 1910-1941. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press. pp. 140–141. ISBN 1-55750-563-2.

Further reading

  • The Illustrated Encyclopaedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). London: Orbis Publications. 1982–1985.CS1 maint: date format (link)
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