John Butler, 6th Earl of Ormond

John Butler, 6th Earl of Ormond (died 14 December 1476) was considered one of the first gentlemen of the age in which he lived. He was an ambassador to the most important courts of Europe.

John Butler, 6th Earl of Ormond
Born1422
Kilkenny, Ireland
Died14 December 1476
Palestine
Spouse(s)Reynalda O'Brien (mistress)
Issue
Sir James Ormond (illegitimate)
John Ormond (illegitimate)
Edward Ormond (illegitimate)
FatherJames Butler, 4th Earl of Ormond
MotherJoan de Beauchamp

Family

John Butler, 6th Earl of Ormond was the second son of James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormond, by his first wife, Joan de Beauchamp (d. 3 or 5 August 1430). He had an elder brother, James Butler, 5th Earl of Ormond, and a younger brother, Thomas Butler, 7th Earl of Ormond, as well as two sisters, Elizabeth Butler, who married John Talbot, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury, and Anne Butler (d. 4 January 1435), who was contracted to marry Thomas FitzGerald, 7th Earl of Desmond, although the marriage appears not to have taken place. [1]

Career

War of the Roses

A supporter of the Lancastrian cause, he was present at the Battle of Towton in 1461 where his elder brother was killed. He succeeded his brother to the title, but was forced to go on the run after this heavy defeat. Taking shelter in either Cumbria or Scotland he then crossed over to Ireland where there was still considerable support for his cause in Tipperary and Kilkenny. After raising a force amongst them he was confronted by the pro-Yorkist head of the Dublin government, Thomas Fitzgerald, Earl of Desmond. The two clashed at the Battle of Piltown in 1462, which ended in a decisive Yorkist victory. Ormond's army suffered over a thousand casualties.

He was subsequently restored to the earldom by Edward IV after having been attainted for his part in the Towton. Edward IV is reported to have said that "if good breeding and liberal qualities were lost in the world, they might be all found in the Earl of Ormond". He was a complete master of the languages of Europe, and was sent as ambassador to its principal courts.

Marriage and children

Ellis says that 'according to family tradition, Ormond died unmarried in the Holy Land, on pilgrimage, before 15 June 1477, possibly on 14 December 1476'.[2] By his mistress Reynalda O'Brien, daughter of Turlogh "The Brown" O'Brien, King of Thomond, he had three illegitimate sons:[3]

  • Sir James Ormond (1462-1497).[4][2][3]
  • John Ormond (1462-October 5, 1503),[3] who married the heiress Joan Chaworth (d.1507), by whom he had three daughters.[5]
  • Edward Ormond, (b.1450)[3]

He was succeeded by his younger brother, Thomas Butler, 7th Earl of Ormond.[2]

See also

Notes

References

  • Ellis, Steven G. (2004). "Ormond, Sir James (d. 1497)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/20841.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  • Ellis, Steven G. (2004). "Butler, John, sixth earl of Ormond (d. 1476/7)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/4195.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  • Richardson, Douglas (2011). Everingham, Kimball G. (ed.). Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. I (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. p. 382. ISBN 1449966373.
Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by
James Butler
Earl of Ormond
1461–1478
Succeeded by
Thomas Butler



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