Hyannis Harbor Hawks

The Hyannis Harbor Hawks, formerly the Hyannis Mets, are a collegiate summer baseball team based in Hyannis, Massachusetts. The team is a member of the Cape Cod Baseball League (CCBL) and plays in the league's Western Division. The Harbor Hawks play their home games at Judy Walden Scarafile Field at McKeon Park. The team is owned and operated by the non-profit Hyannis Athletic Association.

Hyannis Harbor Hawks
Information
LeagueCape Cod Baseball League (Western Division)
LocationHyannis, Massachusetts
BallparkJudy Walden Scarafile Field at McKeon Park
League championships1978, 1979, 1991
Former name(s)Hyannis Mets
MascotOzzie Osprey
ManagerGary Calhoun
General ManagerTino DiGiovanni
PresidentBrad Pfeifer
Websitewww.harborhawks.org

Hyannis most recently won the CCBL championship in 1991 when they defeated the Chatham A's two games to none to win the best of three championship series. The title was the third in team history, having won back-to-back league championships in 1978 and 1979. Hyannis joined the CCBL in 1976 as an expansion team, bringing the number of teams in the league at the time to eight.

History

The Pre-Modern Era

Early years

Baseball in the villages of Barnstable dates back to the early days of the sport on Cape Cod. The Barnstable Cummaquids were organized in 1867 and battled the "Yarmouth Mattakeesetts" on at least three occasions that year. After splitting their first two recorded contests, the seemingly evenly-matched teams met for a highly-anticipated third game, this time as an attraction at the Barnstable County Fair. The Cummaquids took the lopsided match, 30-13, and with their victory secured the prize of a "beautiful silver mounted carved black walnut bat costing $15."[1][2] The Barnstable team met up with a team from Yarmouth again in 1883 for a July 4 contest that had become an annual event.[3] An 1885 poster advertising another July 4 contest, this time between Barnstable and Sandwich, was uncovered by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York. Although no formal league had been established at this time, the poster became the source for the traditional dating of the Cape League's origin to 1885.[1]

The Hyannis town team had its share of stars during the early years of the twentieth century. In 1909, former major leaguer Fred Klobedanz pitched for Hyannis. Klobedanz had pitched several seasons with the National League Boston Beaneaters, posting a 26-7 record in 1897 and a 19-10 record in the team's 1898 pennant-winning season.[4][5] In 1917, Holy Cross star Ed Gill pitched a no-hit, no-run game for Hyannis where he did not allow a ball to be hit to the outfield.[6][7] Gill went on to play in the major leagues for the Washington Senators. Cape Cod native Joel "Joe" Sherman of Yarmouth pitched for Hyannis for many seasons. As a young man, he had played for the team from 1906 to 1913.[8] Then after a 14-year hiatus he returned to play again for Hyannis from 1927 to 1931.[9] In between, Sherman had a brief stint in the majors with Connie Mack's Philadelphia Athletics in 1915. Sherman's long career with Hyannis, predating even the formation of the league itself in 1923, accounts for his being referred to by some as the "father of the [Cape] league."[10][11]

The early Cape League era (1923-1939)

In 1923 the Cape Cod Baseball League was formed and originally included Falmouth, Chatham, and two Barnstable teams: Osterville and Hyannis. Hyannis played home games at Hallett's Field on Main Street in downtown Hyannis, and Osterville played at West Bay Field in Osterville. After the 1930 season, the two teams merged into a combined "Barnstable" team, with home games being split between the two ballparks.[12] Funding for town teams during this period was difficult to secure. Teams depended largely on the town itself to appropriate funds, and the impact of the Great Depression made this an especially difficult annual town decision. As a result, the Barnstable team was forced to withdraw from the Cape League for the 1938 season,[13] and the league itself folded after the 1939 season.

The town's teams had great success in the early Cape League, winning a combined seven league championships during the 17-year duration of the league. The Osterville team won the title in 1924 and 1925. Osterville and Hyannis agreed to share the title in 1926, as weather and the departure of college players for school prevented the scheduling of a decisive game.[14][15] Hyannis took the title in 1927, and Osterville was back on top in 1928. The combined Barnstable team was league champion in 1934 and 1937. The Barnstable teams of this era were replete with college stars and semi-pro players, many of whom went on to major league careers.

Hyannis boasted a "parade of sluggers"[16] that included Georgetown University football star Tony Plansky, who went on to play for the NFL's New York Giants. In 1999, Plansky was ranked by Sports Illustrated as the #25 all-time greatest sports figure from Massachusetts. He was inducted into the CCBL hall of fame in 2001.[17][18][19] Other Hyannis sluggers included NYU's Ken Strong, another collegiate football star who went on to a long NFL career and is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[16] Brockton, Massachusetts native and Boston College shortstop Freddie Moncewicz played for Hyannis between 1923 and 1927, winning the league title as player-manager in 1926 and 1927, then played for the Boston Red Sox in 1928, and returned to his post as Hyannis player-manager in 1929.[20][21][22] Newburyport, Massachusetts native Paddy Creeden joined Hyannis while still a student at Brockton High School in 1924.[23] He played for Hyannis again from 1926 to 1930, and was described as a "very smart ball player, especially fast on his feet and one of the league's leading base stealers."[24] After a brief stint with the Boston Red Sox early in 1931, Creeden returned to play with Barnstable for the remainder of that season.[12] In 1929, Hyannisport summer resident and ex-Boston mayor John F. "Honey Fitz" Fitzgerald performed his well-known rendition of Sweet Adeline at a benefit concert for the Hyannis baseball team.[25]

Osterville's 1924 team featured Shanty Hogan and Danny "Deacon" MacFayden, a Cape Cod native from Truro. The pair had been teammates at Somerville High School, and led Osterville to the 1924 Cape League title. Hogan went on to enjoy a 13-year major league career, much of it with the hometown Boston Braves.[26][27][28] MacFayden began his major league career in 1926 with the Boston Red Sox, and pitched for a total of 17 years in the major leagues, winning a World Series title with the New York Yankees in 1932. MacFayden was inducted into the CCBL hall of fame in 2012.[29] The 1929 Osterville team featured Lynn, Massachusetts native John "Blondy" Ryan,[30] who went on to play for the World Series-winning 1933 New York Giants, Vito Tamulis, who went on to play for the Yankees and Brooklyn Dodgers,[30] and former Dartmouth College football and ice hockey standout Myles Lane. Lane had just completed his rookie season in the National Hockey League, a defenseman for the 1929 Stanley Cup champion Boston Bruins, and would play for Osterville through 1931. He would go on to a career in law, becoming a New York Supreme Court justice.[31][32][28]

When the Hyannis and Osterville teams combined in 1931, the new team was led by player-manager Danny Silva, who had filled the same role for Osterville the previous season. Silva had played briefly for the Washington Senators in 1919, and after his playing days became a longtime umpire in the CCBL. In the early 1960s when a knowledgeable and universally respected figure was needed to unify the newly-reorganized Cape League, Silva was chosen and served as the first commissioner of the league's modern era, a position he held from 1962 to 1968. Silva was inducted into the CCBL hall of fame as part of its inaugural class of 2000.[33]

Quincy, Massachusetts native Ted Olson was a dominant pitcher for Barnstable in 1934 and 1935, and went on to play for the Boston Red Sox.[34][35] CCBL hall of famer Lennie Merullo also played for Barnstable in 1935,[33] and went on to play seven seasons with the Chicago Cubs. Barnstable's 1937 league title was won in exciting fashion as ace pitcher Norman Merrill tossed a no-hitter to beat Bourne, 5-0 on the final day of the season to clinch the league title. The win capped a stellar season for Merrill, who won 13 games for Barnstable while batting .394.[36] The powerful team had seven players who batted over .300, and also featured burly slugger John Spirida, who would go on to play pro football for the Washington Redskins in 1939.[37]

The Upper and Lower Cape League era (1946-1962)

The Cape League was revived after World War II, and was originally composed of 11 teams across Upper Cape and Lower Cape divisions. Barnstable's entry in the 1946 Lower Cape division was known as the Barnstable Townies and played at the Barnstable High School field in Hyannis. The team moved to the Upper Cape division in 1947 where they would compete against Barnstable's other newly-formed Cape League team from the village of Cotuit.

Early on, the Townies were not a particularly strong team. The team was reportedly not well-managed, and favored veteran players over younger but more talented ones.[38] The team was rejuvenated under the new moniker Barnstable Barons, and found itself among the top teams in the league in 1951 and 1952, but in June of 1952 impulsively withdrew from the league after a disputed forfeit ruling.[39] The Barnstable team was reorganized in 1955 under the old nickname "Townies", but this iteration only lasted two seasons.[40] After another two seasons without a team in the league, Barnstable put forward a new team for the 1959 season, dubbed the Barnstable Red Sox.[41]

The Modern Era (1963-present)

The Cape League was reorganized in 1963 and became officially sanctioned by the NCAA as a collegiate league. This marked the beginning of the league's "modern era". The Barnstable Red Sox had played in the Cape League from 1959 to 1962, but were not part of the newly-reorganized league in 1963. However, after the league's Bourne Canalmen dropped out of the league following the 1972 season, the number of teams in the league was reduced to an uneven seven, and an opportunity was perceived by then state senator and CCBL hall of famer John "Jack" Aylmer.[29] A Barnstable native and member of the 1952 Barnstable Barons, Aylmer became the driving force of a movement to bring an expansion team to Hyannis. In 1976 the new team began play in the CCBL as the Hyannis Mets, so named in the hope that the team might enlist financial assistance from the New York Mets, which was not forthcoming.[42][43]

1976: The Mets' inaugural season

In its inaugural season, the new Hyannis franchise played its home games at Barnstable High School,[44] and was skippered by Ben Hays, who had previously managed in the league with Chatham. The Mets finished the regular season in fourth place in the eight-team league and posted a winning record, enough to qualify them for the playoffs where they were subsequently ousted by Chatham. The 1976 team included future major leaguers Ross Baumgarten and CCBL hall of famer Nat "Buck" Showalter,[45] who launched the Mets' season by going 4 for 4 with a home run and 6 RBI in the team's opening day 17-5 victory over Falmouth.[46] Showalter went on to bat a whopping .434 for the season and was named the 1976 CCBL MVP.

Back-to-back championships to close the 1970s

In only their third year in the league, the Mets finished the 1978 season with a 31-11 record, the best in the league. Managed by CCBL hall of famer Bob Schaefer, who had played and managed in the league with Sagamore and Bourne,[47] the team was powered by three CCBL hall of fame players: pitcher Dennis Long,[48] Holy Cross standout Ron Perry, Jr.,[49] and slugging catcher Bill Schroeder, who belted 15 home runs for the Mets and was named the league's MVP and outstanding pro prospect.[50] The Mets faced Orleans in the semifinal playoffs, and took Game 1 at home. The Mets jumped out early in Game 2 at Eldredge Park on first-inning long balls by Schroeder and Jim Watkins. Watkins blasted another one in the eighth, and drove in six RBIs in the Mets' 10-7 series-clinching win. Hyannis moved on to meet Harwich in the best-of-five championship series. In Game 1 at home, the Mets found themselves down 6-1 early, but exploded behind two homers from Bob Teegarden, storming back for a 15-6 win. Teegarden launched another one in Game 2, and Pete Filson pitched a gem in the Mets' 6-1 win. The Mariners refused to roll over, however, taking Game 3 at Hyannis, 5-2. In Game 4, Jeff Twitty allowed two Mariner runs in the first, but settled down and didn't allow another run, going the distance in a 4-2 Hyannis victory that earned the Mets their first CCBL crown.[51][52]

Schaefer's squad would repeat the feat in 1979 with an even more impressive 33-win regular season, and a second championship victory over Harwich. 1979 was the team's first season of play in the newly-reconstructed McKeon Park.[53][54] The team returned CCBL hall of famers Long and Perry, and featured yet another CCBL hall of famer in outfielder Ross Jones.[55] Long posted an impressive 8-1 record for the Mets. League MVP Perry batted .401 for the regular season, but lost the batting title to Jones, who batted .413 and was named the league's outstanding pro prospect. In the semi-final playoffs against Chatham, Hyannis sent Long to the mound for Game 1 at home, coming away with a 6-2 win.[56] Game 2 at Veterans Field was closely contested until the Mets pushed across four runs in the ninth to take the series with an 8-4 victory. Facing Harwich in the title series for a second consecutive season, the Mets dropped a slugfest in Game 1, 12-10. Game 2 was a 12-2 Hyannis rout of the Mariners. Games 3 and 4 were played as a home-and-home doubleheader. The Mets took the afternoon front end at home, 12-6. In the nightcap at Whitehouse Field, Hyannis jumped out to a 5-0 lead in the top of the first, but when the Mariners scored two of their own in the bottom of the opening frame, the Mets brought in all-star reliever Ed Olwine for some long relief. Olwine had tossed two and two-thirds innings of relief in the Game 3 afternoon tilt, and proceeded to finish out Game 4, throwing an additional eight and one-third masterful innings in the Mets' 7-3 championship-clinching win.[57][58][59]

Skipper Bob Schaefer would leave after the 1979 season, but his combined regular season record of 64-18-1 with two league championships in just two seasons is among the most impressive managerial resumes in CCBL history.

The 1980s

The Mets would make the playoffs five times in the 1980s, reaching the championship series twice, but coming up short both times. The 1980 Mets boasted league batting champ Brick Smith, who hit at a .391 clip. With a club that included future major league player and Boston Red Sox manager John Farrell, the 1982 Mets reached the title series but were swept by Chatham.[60]

In 1987, Hyannis was led by a pair of CCBL hall of famers in pitcher Pat Hope[61] and future major league all-star Robin Ventura.[19] Hope set a league record with 11 victories, and hurled a perfect game against Wareham, while Ventura batted .370 and was the league's outstanding pro prospect. The 1987 team also included slugger Albert "Joey" Belle, who would go on to hit 381 major league home runs. The 1989 Mets were skippered by CCBL hall of famer Ed Lyons,[33] and featured league outstanding pro prospect and future Philadelphia Phillies all-star pitcher Tyler Green, but the club was again swept in the title series, this time by Y-D.[62]

The 1990s and another title

Hyannis would once again claim the Cape League title in 1991, with a team that included future major leaguers Rich Aurilia and Boston Red Sox captain Jason Varitek. In the playoff semi-finals against Wareham, Varitek caught a no-hitter tossed by the Mets' Richard King. The Mets matched up against Chatham in the championship series. In Game 1 at McKeon Park, Southern Illinois University hurler Mike Van Gilder tossed 8 1/3 stellar innings for Hyannis, and University of Miami pinch-hitter Juan Llanes poked an RBI single with two outs in the ninth to give the Mets the walkoff win. Don Wengert was strong on the mound for the Mets in Game 2 at Chatham, and Hyannis got two-run blasts from Greg Shockey in the first and Matt Luke in the sixth to win 5-2 and complete the series sweep and claim a third CCBL crown.[63] Chad McConnell took home playoff MVP honors.

In 1993, Varitek returned to Hyannis from the 1991 title team and was named league MVP, winning the 1993 batting crown with a .371 average, and catching another no-hitter for Hyannis, this one thrown by future St. Louis Cardinals all-star Matt Morris. Varitek was inducted into the CCBL hall of fame in 2002.[64][45]

After an all-star 1994 season for the Mets in which he tied the league record for doubles in a season (19), Indiana State University standout Dan Olson returned for another all-star campaign in Hyannis in 1995. He would own the night at the '95 mid-summer CCBL classic, claiming the all-star home run derby crown, then going 3-for-4 and taking home MVP honors in the West division's 4-0 all-star shutout victory.[65][66]

The 2000s and the birth of the Harbor Hawks

Hyannis qualified for the postseason three times and reached the CCBL championship series once in the 2000s, being swept in 2000 by Brewster.[67][68] The 2000 season saw internationally-acclaimed recording star and Martha's Vineyard resident Carly Simon on hand at McKeon Park to toss out the first pitch and take in a few innings of the Mets' July 11 game with Brewster.[69][70]

From 2002 through 2005, the Mets played an annual regular season home game at Tom Nevers Field in Nantucket, in what was billed as the "Nantucket Pennant" game. Falmouth won the 2002 Nantucket game, but the Mets avenged the loss by defeating the Commodores in the 2003 island rematch. Hyannis defeated Y-D, 9-7 in the 2004 event, but lost to Harwich, 9-3 in 2005.[71][72][73] Also from 2002 to 2005, the Mets played an annual regular season home game at Fenton Field in Sandwich, Massachusetts, an event honoring the part Sandwich played in the early history of baseball on Cape Cod. Over the four-year span, the event saw the Mets play host to each of their four West division CCBL rivals.[74][75]

The Mets' 2003 team featured CCBL hall of famer Sam Fuld, a speedy center fielder and future major leaguer who batted .361 for the Mets.[76][77] Charlie Furbush of South Portland, Maine twirled for Hyannis in 2005 and 2006. He was named the league's Outstanding New England Player in 2006, posting a 1.83 ERA in 54 innings, tossing a no-hitter against Bourne, and being named the West division all-star game starter.[78] Hyannis boasted the league's top batsman in 2006 in Matt Mangini, who led the league with a .310 average, and was West division starting third baseman in the all-star game.[79] University of Hawaii hurler Matt Daly provided the highlight of the 2007 season with a no-hitter against Wareham.[80] Mets Slugger Chris Dominguez crushed three home runs in a single game in 2008, the first CCBL player to accomplish the feat since baseball hall of famer Frank Thomas did it for Orleans twenty years earlier.[81]

In late 2008, Major League Baseball announced that it would enforce its trademarks, and required those CCBL teams who shared a nickname with an MLB team to either change their nicknames or buy their uniforms and merchandise only through MLB-licensed vendors.[82] In 2009, two CCBL teams, Orleans and Chatham proceeded to change their nicknames. In 2010, Hyannis followed suit and became the Hyannis Harbor Hawks, the name an homage to the ospreys, or "fish hawks" who routinely nest atop the light stanchions at McKeon Park.[83]

The 2010s

The Harbor Hawks were skippered throughout the 2010s by Judson University coach Chad Gassman, who took the Hyannis post in 2009 after serving as pitching coach the prior season. Under Gassman, Hyannis qualified for postseason play six times in the 2010s. The 2012 Harbor Hawks team featured the league's outstanding pitcher and outstanding pro prospect, Sean Manaea.[84] Manaea went on to play in the major leagues for the Oakland A's, throwing a no-hitter against the Boston Red Sox in 2018.

In 2015, Gassman's club finished in first place atop the West division and was led by a trio of top moundsmen. Aaron Civale posted an 0.36 ERA with five saves in 25 innings, Dakota Hudson hurled 42.2 innings with a 1.68 ERA and 41 strikeouts,[85] and Devin Smeltzer, the West division all-star co-MVP,[86] threw a nine-inning no-hitter against Harwich in which he missed a perfect game by a single walk.[87] In the playoffs, the Hawks defeated Cotuit in the first-round series, then shut down Bourne in the West finals to reach the league championship series, where the Harbor Hawks were defeated two games to one by Y-D.[88]

The 2018 Harbor Hawks featured league MVP and batting champion Matthew Barefoot, who finished the season with a .379 mark.[89][90] After the 2019 season, Gassman, the longest-tenured manager in team history, announced he would not be returning after 11 seasons with Hyannis.[91]

CCBL Hall of Fame inductees

The CCBL Hall of Fame and Museum is a history museum and hall of fame honoring past players, coaches, and others who have made outstanding contributions to the CCBL.[92] Below are the inductees who spent all or part of their time in the Cape League with Hyannis.

Year Inducted Ref. Name Position
2000 [33] Danny SilvaPlayer/Manager
Lennie MerulloPlayer
Ed LyonsManager
2001 [19] Tony PlanskyPlayer
Robin VenturaPlayer
2002 [45] Buck ShowalterPlayer
Jason VaritekPlayer
2003[49]Ron Perry Jr.Player
2004[61]Pat HopePlayer
2006[55]Ross JonesPlayer
2007[47]Bob SchaeferManager
2009[50]Bill SchroederPlayer
2012 [29] John "Jack" AylmerPlayer/Executive
Danny “Deacon” MacFaydenPlayer
2014[77]Sam FuldPlayer
2017[48]Dennis LongPlayer

Notable alumni

Yearly results

Results by Season, 1923-1930 (Hyannis)
Year Won Lost Regular Season Finish Postseason* Manager Ref
1923572nd League (T)Wally Snell[93][94]
192412122nd LeagueDonald Dike[95]
1925Donald Dike[96]
192624171st League (T)Won championship (co-champs)Freddie Moncewicz[97][15]
192725101st LeagueWon championshipFreddie Moncewicz[98][99]
192822212nd LeagueArthur Norton[100][101]
192922223rd LeagueFreddie Moncewicz[102]
193018265th LeagueFreddie Moncewicz[103][104]
Results by Season, 1923-1930 (Osterville)
Year Won Lost Regular Season Finish Postseason* Manager Ref
1923572nd League (T)Arthur "Dutch" Ayer[94][105]
19241951st LeagueWon championshipArthur "Dutch" Ayer[106][107]
19251st LeagueWon championshipJoe Murphy[108][109]
192624171st League (T)Won championship (co-champs)John "Dot" Whelan[110][111]
19278255th LeagueArthur "Dutch" Ayer[112][98]
192828141st LeagueWon championshipEddie McGrath[113]
192919255th LeagueEddie McGrath[114]
193012327th LeagueDanny Silva[115]
Results by Season, 1931-1939 (Barnstable)
Year Won Lost Regular Season Finish Postseason* Manager Ref
193120285th LeagueDanny Silva[116]
19328265th LeagueDanny Silva[117]
193324222nd League (A)
4th League (B)
Pete Herman[118][119]
[120]
193430181st LeagueWon championshipPete Herman[121]
193529191st League (A)
3rd League (B)
Lost championship (Falmouth)Pete Herman[122][123]
[124]
193618294th League (A)
4th League (B)
Pete Herman
George Colbert
[125][126]
193729171st LeagueWon championshipPete Herman[36]
1938 Did not play
193919364th League (A)
3rd League (B)
Dave Concannon
George Colbert
[127]

* During the CCBL's 1923-1939 era, post-season playoffs were a rarity. In most years, the regular season pennant winner was simply crowned as the league champion.
However, there were four years in which the league split its regular season and crowned separate champions for the first (A) and second (B) halves. In two of those
seasons (1936 and 1939), a single team won both halves and was declared overall champion. In the other two split seasons (1933 and 1935), a post-season
playoff series was contested between the two half-season champions to determine the overall champion.

Results by Season, 1946-1962 (Barnstable)
Year Won Lost Regular Season Finish Postseason Manager Ref
1946Lost semi-finals (Harwich)Percy Brown[128]
1947Charlie Duchesney[129]
1948
1949
1950
1951George Nickerson[130]
1952*
1953 Did not play
1954 Did not play
1955Steve Howes
Jake Marcelino
Ray Ellis
[131][132]
[133]
1956Ray Ellis[134]
1957 Did not play
1958 Did not play
1959Charles Hitchcock
George Karras
[135][136]
1960George Karras[137]
1961Lost round 1 (Cotuit)Art Morgan[138][139]
1962
* Withdrew from league mid-season.
Results by Season, 1976-present
Year Won Lost Tied Regular Season Finish Postseason Manager
1976212014th LeagueLost semi-finals (Chatham)Ben Hays
1977152147th LeagueBen Hays
1978311101st LeagueWon semi-finals (Orleans)
Won championship (Harwich)
Bob Schaefer
197933711st LeagueWon semi-finals (Chatham)
Won championship (Harwich)
Bob Schaefer
1980182316th LeagueRich Magner
1981202205th LeagueRich Magner
1982221913rd LeagueWon semi-finals (Cotuit)
Lost championship (Chatham)
Rich Magner
1983201744th LeagueLost semi-finals (Cotuit)Rich Magner
1984162517th LeagueRich Magner
1985172416th LeagueRich Magner
1986172417th LeagueFrank Cacciatore
1987251603rd LeagueLost semi-finals (Y-D)Dave Holliday
1988261702nd West DivisionLost semi-finals (Wareham)Wayne Graham
1989242002nd West DivisionWon semi-finals (Bourne)
Lost championship (Y-D)
Ed Lyons
1990202313rd West DivisionBrad Kelley
1991261622nd West DivisionWon semi-finals (Wareham)
Won championship (Chatham)
Brad Kelley
1992172605th West DivisionGlenn Tufts
1993251902nd West DivisionLost semi-finals (Wareham)Steve Mrowka
1994212113rd West DivisionSteve Mrowka
1995222013rd West DivisionSteve Mrowka
1996202404th West DivisionSteve Mrowka
1997192325th West DivisionSteve Mrowka
1998192233rd West DivisionSteve Mrowka
1999182424th West DivisionTom O'Connell
2000212122nd West DivisionWon semi-finals (Wareham)
Lost championship (Brewster)
Tom O'Connell
2001172705th West DivisionMike Juhl
2002152635th West DivisionKeith Stohr
2003211942nd West DivisionLost semi-finals (Bourne)Keith Stohr
2004212212nd West DivisionLost semi-finals (Falmouth)Greg King
200573615th West DivisionGreg King
2006162434th West DivisionGreg King
2007202133rd West DivisionGreg King
2008222204th West DivisionRick Robinson
2009162615th West DivisionChad Gassman
2010143005th West DivisionChad Gassman
2011291504th West DivisionLost round 1 (Falmouth)Chad Gassman
2012172705th West DivisionChad Gassman
2013251902nd West DivisionLost round 1 (Cotuit)Chad Gassman
2014192413rd West DivisionLost round 1 (Falmouth)Chad Gassman
2015241911st West DivisionWon round 1 (Cotuit)
Won semi-finals (Bourne)
Lost championship (Y-D)
Chad Gassman
2016172704th West DivisionLost round 1 (Falmouth)Chad Gassman
2017162535th West DivisionChad Gassman
2018241732nd West DivisionLost round 1 (Falmouth)Chad Gassman
201993235th West DivisionChad Gassman

League Award Winners

The Pat Sorenti
MVP Award
Year Player
1976Nat Showalter
1978Bill Schroeder
1979Ron Perry Jr.
1993Jason Varitek
2018Matthew Barefoot
The Robert A. McNeece
Outstanding Pro Prospect Award
Year Player
1978Bill Schroeder
1979Ross Jones
1987Robin Ventura
1989Tyler Green
2012Sean Manaea
2013Jeff Hoffman
The BFC Whitehouse
Outstanding Pitcher Award
Year Player
1987Pat Hope
2012Sean Manaea
The Russ Ford
Outstanding Relief Pitcher Award
Year Player
2008Russell Brewer
2013Eric Eck
2016Garrett Cave
2018Dylan Thomas


The Daniel J. Silva
Sportsmanship Award
Year Player
1980Brick Smith*
1983Jim Howard
1988Will Vespe
1999Curtis Sapp
2003Richard Mercado
2004Chris Robinson
2007Shea Robin
The Manny Robello
10th Player Award
Year Player
1987Tom Aldrich
1997Alex Santos
The John J. Claffey Outstanding
New England Player Award
Year Player
2006Charlie Furbush
2015Aaron Civale
The Thurman Munson Award
for Batting Champion
Year Player
1976Nat Showalter (.434)
1979Ross Jones (.407)
1980Brick Smith (.391)
1993Jason Varitek (.371)
2006Matt Mangini (.310)
2010John Ruettiger (.369)
2018Matthew Barefoot (.379)


All-Star Game MVP Award
Year Player
1979Ross Jones
1991Doug Hecker
1995Dan Olson
2000Brian Stavisky
2003Sam Fuld
2008Ben Paulsen
2014Ryan Perez
2015Devin Smeltzer*
2016Zach Rutherford
All-Star Home Run Hitting
Contest Champion
Year Player
1991Chad McConnell
1995Dan Olson
2013Skyler Ewing
2016Kameron Esthay
The Star of Stars
Playoff MVP Award
Year Player
1991Chad McConnell

(*) - Indicates co-recipient
() - Since 1991, an All-Star Game MVP has been named for each of the league's two divisions.

Managerial History

Manager Seasons Total Seasons Championship Seasons
Ben Hays1976 - 19772
Bob Schaefer1978 - 197921978, 1979
Rich Magner1980 - 19856
Frank Cacciatore19861
Dave Holliday19871
Wayne Graham19881
Ed Lyons19891
Brad Kelley1990 - 199121991
Glenn Tufts19921
Steve Mrowka1993 - 19986
Tom O'Connell1999 - 20002
Mike Juhl20011
Keith Stohr2002 - 20032
Greg King2004 - 20074
Rick Robinson20081
Chad Gassman2009 - 201911

See also

  • Hyannis Harbor Hawks players

References

  1. James H. Ellis. "Cape Cod League a Talent Showcase". sabr.org. Retrieved August 16, 2019.
  2. Morris, Peter. Cummaquid Base Ball Club of Barnstable in Baseball Founders: The Clubs, Players and Cities of the Northeast that Established the Game, Peter Morris, et al, eds. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2013. pp.316-17. ISBN 978-0-7864-7430-1.
  3. "Play Ball!". barnstablepatriot.com. Retrieved August 16, 2019.
  4. "4th of July at Hyannis". Hyannis Patriot. Hyannis, MA. July 5, 1909. p. 2.
  5. "Base Ball at Hyannis". Hyannis Patriot. Hyannis, MA. July 19, 1909.
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  7. "SEASON GLEANINGS". Falmouth Enterprise. Falmouth, MA. September 9, 1938. p. 5.
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