Hour of Power

Hour of Power is a weekly American Protestant television program formerly broadcast from the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, California, a cathedral that is now a Catholic church. The program is currently broadcast from Shepherd's Grove.

Hour of Power
GenreProtestant television
Presented by
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons49
No. of episodes2550 [1]
Production
Production location(s)Irvine, California
Running time60 minutes
Release
Original networkFirst-run syndication
Original releaseFebruary 1970 (1970-02) 
present
Chronology
Related showsBobby Schuller your hour of power (30 minute version)
External links
Website

The program was founded and first hosted by Robert H. Schuller.[2] It is currently hosted by Bobby Schuller,[3] who is Robert H. Schuller's grandson and the son of Robert A. Schuller, himself a former host. It was also once hosted by Sheila Schuller Coleman, a daughter of Robert H. Schuller.

The program is normally one hour long, but some networks broadcast an edited 30-minute program. It features a large congregation, mostly Christian music with a choir (with an orchestra as well as the Crystal Cathedral organ as of March 2012) and guests who speak about how God and their Christian faith have changed their lives for the better.

History

The program first aired in 1970 as a church service of the Garden Grove Community Church (Reformed Church in America). By the 1980s, it was the most-watched weekly religious program in living rooms across America.[4] It was originally hosted by the elder Schuller; the younger Schuller hosted it from 2006 to 2008.

On July 9, 2008, the presidency of the church was shifted from the Robert H. Schuller to his son-in-law Jim Coleman. On October 26, 2008, it was announced that Schuller had removed his son, Robert A. Schuller, as teaching pastor, but allowed him to remain as the Crystal Cathedral's senior pastor. Robert H. Schuller said that he wanted to take the ministry in a different direction and for the foreseeable future would use guest speakers for the weekly services rather than his son.[5] Well-known speakers who were used in the early stages of the new format included Lee Strobel, John C. Maxwell, and Bill Hybels. On November 29, 2008, the church announced that the younger Schuller had resigned.[6]

On October 18, 2010, the board of the Crystal Cathedral filed for bankruptcy in Santa Ana, California.[7][8]

On March 10, 2012, it was announced that Robert H. Schuller and his wife, Arvella, would be leaving the church. The following day their elder daughter, Sheila Schuller Coleman, announced at the morning service that she would also be leaving the church, therefore cutting all family ties with the Crystal Cathedral and Hour of Power, stating that "This is the last Sunday we will be worshiping in this building."[9] The ministry's successor, the Rev. Bill Bennett, said that the ministry would continue but using a more traditional service.[9] In June 2012, the Rev. Bobby Schuller, the son of Robert A. Schuller, started preaching on a voluntary basis. In February 2013, Bobby Schuller was named as pastor for the Hour of Power. The Crystal Cathedral congregation was renamed Shepherd's Grove in 2013. Financial considerations dictated a move to a smaller property soon after, as well as a decision to sell the Crystal Cathedral, to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange, CA, for 49 million dollars. The diocese plans to spend over 100 million dollars on structural repairs and alterations necessary to adapt the building for Catholic services. When completed, it is to be rededicated as "Christ Cathedral." Following the move from the Garden Grove Campus, services were held in the former Catholic Church in the fall of 2013. The congregation moved to Irvine Presbyterian Church in April 2018 after it was sold to real estate developers. Like the previous location of the Crystal Cathedral and former Catholic Church, it is quite mixed with a rooftop Windows.

Broadcasts

The program airs in the United States mainly using paid programming time on Freeform (TV channel), the Trinity Broadcasting Network/The Church Channel, Hillsong Channel, and recently Daystar (TV network). along with about 100 stations through individual contracts. The program also airs over the American Forces Network.

In Canada it is carried on VisionTV.

In Europe it is broadcast on CNBC Europe, VOX in Austria, Germany and Switzerland, on RTL in the Netherlands and Sky1 in Ireland and the United Kingdom.

In the Middle East it is carried on METV in Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria.

In Australia, it is seen on EXPO, Australian Christian Channel, Network Ten and SevenTWO; the program is also broadcast weekly on radio.

It is broadcast in New Zealand on the Prime network.

It is broadcast in Hong Kong on NOW TV Channel 564, TVB Pearl, and Hong Kong Open TV.

The Hour of Power telecast, filmed in the Crystal Cathedral's main sanctuary, at one point attracted 1.3 million viewers from 156 countries.[10] Under current Pastor Bobby Schuller, the program attracted 2.2 million viewers worldwide each week.

Finances

Beginning in the late 1990s, the ministry struggled financially after it borrowed money to build a visitors' center.

2008 revenues for the program were nearly $5 million lower than revenues for 2007. As of early 2009, the church planned to sell more than $65 million worth of its Orange County property to pay off debt:[6] 150 acres (0.61 km2) in San Juan Capistrano, California, and an office building in Garden Grove, California.[11] Due to their financial situation, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange purchased the Garden Grove campus.

References

Further reading

  • Ron Rokhy (30 June 2013). "Crystal Cathedral holds last service before relocating". NBC Southern California. NBCUniversal Media, LLC. Retrieved 2013-07-06. The Crystal Cathedral, which sold its campus to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange in 2011 due to financial troubles, held its final service on Sunday before swapping facilities with a nearby Catholic sanctuary.

This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.