Harry Sniderman

Harry Sniderman was a sports figure in Toronto, Canada, who was later known as an promoter, organizer and businessman.[1][2][3][4]

Harry Sniderman

In 1936 the Olympics were held in Berlin, the capital of Nazi Germany, so Sniderman and several other athletes who objected to attending an event in Nazi Germany attended an alternate Olympics in Barcelona.[5]

Sniderman was survived by his wife, Molly, who died in 2009.[6]

References

  1. Richard Menkis, Harold Troper (2015). "More than Just Games: Canada and the 1936 Olympics". University of Toronto Press. ISBN 9781442626904. Archived from the original on 2018-10-16. Retrieved 2018-10-15.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  2. Jack Lipinsky (2011). "Imposing Their Will: An Organizational History of Jewish Toronto, 1933-1948". McGill-Queen's Press. ISBN 9780773538450. Archived from the original on 2018-10-16. Retrieved 2018-10-15.
  3. Bruce Kidd (2017). "'Critical Support' for Sport". Routledge. ISBN 9781351570497. Archived from the original on 2018-10-16. Retrieved 2018-10-15.
  4. Ralph C. Wilcox, David L. Andrews, Robert Pitter, Richard L. Irwin, eds. (2003). "Sporting Dystopias: The Making and Meanings of Urban Sport Cultures". SUNY Press. ISBN 9780791456705. Archived from the original on 2018-10-16. Retrieved 2018-10-15.CS1 maint: uses editors parameter (link)
  5. Tom Hawthorn (2016-07-26). "The Canadian Boxers Who Thumbed Their Noses at Nazis: Eighty years ago, athletes spurned Hitler by gathering in Barcelona for the 'People's Olympics.'". The Tyee. Archived from the original on 2018-10-16. Retrieved 2018-10-15.
  6. "Molly Sniderman: Obituary". The Toronto Star. 2009-11-05. Archived from the original on 2018-10-16. Retrieved 2018-10-15.


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